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What Kind Of Cheese Is Good For Diabetics?

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Dairy And Diabetes

Dairy And Diabetes

All of us, whether we have diabetes or not, need some dairy products (or non-dairy alternatives like soya products) such as milk, cheese and yogurt every day. These all contain proteins and vitamins and are an important source of calcium, which help to keep your bones and teeth strong. Some dairy foods, however, can be high in fat and saturated fat, so choose lower-fat alternatives where you can. Adults and older children who consume too much fat may find they gain weight and too much saturated fat can cause your cholesterol levels to rise, which increases your risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Unfortunately, diabetes increases your risk of having CVD, so it pays to opt for the lower-fat options to help manage your risk. How much per day? Aim for 3 portions. What's a portion? One portion equals: 190ml (⅓ pint ) milk a small pot of yogurt 2 tbsp cottage cheese a matchbox-sized portion of cheese (30g) How to make healthy dairy choices Milk Switching to lower-fat milk, such as semi-skimmed milk (green top) from whole milk (blue top), which contains the most fat, is a good start. To make even more of a difference, try 1 per cent fat milk (orange top) or even better skimmed milk (red top). Lower-fat milks have all the goodness of whole milk, including calcium, all you lose is the fat. This table shows the savings you could make. The figures are for 100ml but bear in mind a pint is 568ml, which many of us consume each day on cereal and in cups of tea and coffee. It shows how the savings can really add up. Milk Kcal /100ml Fat /100ml Saturated fat /100ml Carbohydrate /100ml Of which sugars /100ml Salt /100ml Whole 64 3.6 2.3 4.7 4.7 0.1 Semi-skimmed 50 1.8 1.1 4.8 4.8 0.1 1% fat 43 1 0.7 4.9 4.9 0.1 Skimmed 35 0.1 < 0.1 5 5 0.1 To help you see if your favourite milk or c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Recipes

Diabetic Recipes

Diabetic-friendly cakes, cookies, and more low-sugar desserts, plus dinner ideas. See more than 520 recipes for diabetics, tested and reviewed by home cooks. Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Risks Of Cheese For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Cheese For People With Diabetes

Can people with diabetes eat cheese? The answer in many cases is yes. This delicious, calcium-rich food contains many nutritional properties that make it a healthy part of a balanced diet. Of course, there are some precautions to keep in mind. Read on to find out what people with diabetes need to know about eating cheese. Cheese can help maintain healthy glucose levels People with diabetes must consider the glycemic content of various foods. This is based on how quickly the body is able to digest the carbohydrates in those foods. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods based on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods are given a higher value the more rapid the rise in blood sugar. Most cheeses contain little to no carbohydrates and thus rate very low on the GI scale. Some cheeses, however, have more than others. For example, cheddar cheese contains just 0.4 grams of carbohydrates per 1 ounce, while Swiss cheese contains 1.5 grams of carbohydrates per 1 ounce. So it’s important to check the nutritional label on various cheeses. Cheese is protein-rich Cheese is generally high in protein, which is great to help balance out the blood sugar spikes that occur when eating carbohydrates alone. When eaten together, they take longer to burn off. Protein also helps people feel full longer, thus reducing cravings for other unhealthy foods. The amount of protein varies depending on the type of cheese. For example, 1 ounce of parmesan contains 10 grams of protein, while cheddar contains 7 grams of protein. Cottage cheese has less than 3 grams per 1 ounce. Cheese may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes At least one study has shown that cheese may lower a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the first place. The 2012 study found th Continue reading >>

Cheese 'beats Diabetes': Just Two Slices A Day Could Reduce Risk Of Developing The Disease, Study Claims

Cheese 'beats Diabetes': Just Two Slices A Day Could Reduce Risk Of Developing The Disease, Study Claims

Researchers said fermentation of cheese could trigger some kind of reaction that protects against diabetes But charity warns link may be 'too simplistic' If you are trying to slim down, you may have crossed cheese off the menu. But scientists have discovered it may actually help prevent diabetes – an illness often triggered by being overweight. They claim that eating just two slices of cheese a day cuts the risk of type 2 diabetes by 12 per cent. The findings go against current health guidelines, which advise cutting back on dairy products and other high-fat foods to help prevent the illness. Around 2.5million Britons have diabetes. Of these, 90 per cent suffer from type 2, which is often caused by being very overweight. But experts fear another million have the condition, which can cause heart attacks, strokes, blindness and nerve problems, without yet having been diagnosed. British and Dutch researchers looked at the diets of 16,800 healthy adults and 12,400 patients with type 2 diabetes from eight European countries, including the UK. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that those who ate at least 55g of cheese a day – around two slices – were 12 per cent less likely to develop type 2 diabetes. The risk fell by the same amount for those who ate 55g of yoghurt a day. For years NHS guidelines have advised against eating too much dairy, cake or red meat as they are high in saturated fat. This is thought to increase cholesterol and raise the risk of diabetes. But the researchers – including academics from the Medical Research Council, Cambridge – say not all saturated fats are as harmful as others, and some may even be beneficial. One theory is that the so-called ‘probiotic’ bacteria in cheese and yoghurt lower choleste Continue reading >>

Best Food Suitable For A Diabetic Type 2 Person

Best Food Suitable For A Diabetic Type 2 Person

Food plans for diabetics vary, depending on allowed individual sugar and carbohydrate content. In general, however, all persons with diabetes should eat, or avoid, the same foods. Avoid Foods Containing Sugar and Most Artificial Sweeteners This includes so-called “sugar-free” foods enhanced with artificial sweeteners. The Most Sugary Foods to Avoid Sweets and Chocolates, Including “Sugar-Free” Types These are not good foods for the diabetic, as they contain sugar and artificial sweeteners. Diabetics may eat Continental dark chocolate, with 70% or more cocoa solids, once a week. Foods Containing Significant Proportions of Ingredients Ending in -ose or -ol These ingredients are usually sugars. One notable exception is cellulose, which is a form of dietary fiber. Grains and Foods Made from Grain Products These include corn, rice, pasta, breads, cakes, tarts, breakfast cereals, and biscuits. Starchy vegetables Particularly avoid parsnips and potatoes. Limit carrots, beans (except runner beans), peas, and other starches. Be careful with packets of mixed vegetables. Limit Certain Dairy Products Limit milk to small quantities. Also limit cottage cheese, and sweetened or low-fat yogurts. Limit Commercially Packaged Foods These processed foods include frozen dinners, especially those marked “lean” or “light”, and snack foods or fast foods. Fruit Juices Choose fresh fruit instead, because it is lower in carbohydrates. For the fruit juice flavor, add a touch of fruit juice to water. Healthy Food for Diabetics This list of diabetic foods contains the best foods for diabetics to eat. All foods listed here are especially for Diabetes Type 2. All Meat Just when you were wondering, “What food can diabetics eat?” you find meat to be tasty answer. Bacon, pork, lamb, b Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Whole Milk For those with diabetes, a diet high in saturated fat can worsen insulin resistance. Keep whole milk out of the fridge, and pick up 1% (low-fat) or skim (non-fat) milk instead. Also, try your best to avoid other whole-milk dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, regular cheese and cream cheese; instead, choose their reduced-fat counterparts whenever possible Previous Next More Photos Bacon White Bread Continue reading >>

Is Celery Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is Celery Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

As diabetes is a complicated disease, diabetic patients have to be wary about what should they eat and what should they not eat. Devising an adequate meal plan is the most important way in which you can manage diabetes in an effective manner. As such, you have to be well-versed with what a food contains and what it does not contain in order to ensure that it does not affect your health in an adverse manner, particularly if you are a diabetic. In this article, we shall study and analyze more about eating celery and how celery might affect the meal plan of a person who happens to suffer from diabetes. So, come and join in for the article Is Celery Good or Bad for Diabetics? Guideline for Including Celery in Your Diet To begin with, let us first see the various essential nutrients and vitamins present in this green, leafy vegetable: Essential nutrients present in celery include folate, manganese, iron, magnesium, phosphorous, calcium, etc. It is a rich source of vitamins such as vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, riboflavin, as well as vitamin B6. It has very fewer calories, saturated fat, and cholesterol The vegetable may be high in its total sodium content when compared to the other vegetables Let us now delve into the advantages and disadvantages of including celery in the diet of a diabetic patient. Benefits of Including Celery in a Diabetic Diet The following are the advantages of including celery in your diet if you are someone who suffers from a condition like diabetes: Celery is a rich source of several antioxidants. These, along with several above-mentioned nutrients that the plant is known for, reduces the inflammation caused in the patients due to diabetes. This is particularly due to the presence of apigenin that is found in the green, leafy vegetable. The prese Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat?

What Should I Eat?

DIABETES and NUTRITION The food that we eat is digested and provides our body with a variety of nutrients and energy measured in kilojoules. Carbohydrate foods are broken down into glucose which is the main source of energy for our bodies. Proteins are broken down into amino acids which are needed for growth and repair of the body. Fats are broken down into triglycerides which are used for energy and a variety of functions within the body for example hormone production and for keeping cell membranes healthy.Following the digestion of food, glucose (from carbohydrates) is absorbed from the small intestine into the blood stream. In response to the increased blood glucose levels, the pancreas releases insulin into the blood stream to assist with transporting the glucose into the cell. This causes the blood glucose levels drop to normal levels again, and so the process repeats itself after each meal.The rise in your blood glucose levels is determined by the amount of glucose entering the blood stream. This depends on the rate of digestion of the food and amount of food eaten, as well as the rate of clearance from the blood into the body’s cells, via insulin.In people with diabetes the amount of insulin released is inadequate and clearance of glucose into the cells is significantly delayed. The THREE basic nutrition components that affect your blood glucose levels on a daily basis are: The timing of your meals and snacks. The quantity of foods and drinks you consume daily The types of foods and drinks you consume daily. The timing of your meals and snacks. The current generation of insulin and other diabetes medications, give people with diabetes flexibility with regard to the timing of meals and snacks. However, it is still recommended that you eat three regular meals per Continue reading >>

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Probiotics And Diabetes: What Amazing New Research Reveals

Diabetes is a dietary and digestive disorder. Clearly, it’s about elevated blood sugar levels. But hey, it’s also more than that. The food we eat feeds the bacteria in our gut. Eat too many carbs/processed foods and you feed the wrong bacteria. Often, diabetics get the disease by doing exactly that. Too much sugar simply translates into the overgrowth of bad bacteria (like yeast). So, it comes as no surprise that probiotics (good gut bacteria) and diabetes are closely linked. Direct Impact Of Probiotics On Diabetes Probiotics play a huge role in digestion. Many of us are ignorant about the importance and benefits of probiotics. Probiotics, or good gut bacteria, should ideally comprise at least 80% of the total gut bacteria. If you are diabetic, adding probiotics, as either food or supplements, can change things dramatically. Of course, you also need to eat the right diet to feed the right bacteria after that. Some of the best probiotics for diabetics modify disturbances in their metabolisms positively. There is strong scientific evidence supporting the fact that consuming probiotics helps decrease the serum cholesterol level and improves insulin sensitivity. RELATED: Meditation And Type 2 Diabetes Probiotics and Diabetes: The Science Behind It How does probiotics help diabetics? Probiotics are live microorganisms which, when administered in correct dosages and form, give you a ton of health benefits. Probiotic supplements have been proven to have positive effects on cardio-metabolic parameters in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. According to research conducted at Loughborough University, probiotics prevent insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is often caused by consuming foods that contain trans fats for a long time. The study found that a high trans-fat and process Continue reading >>

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

Trying To Lower Blood Sugar Levels? Raisins May Help

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. Here, Dr. Suzanne Nelson explains how raisins can still be enjoyed by diabetics because they are a low glycemic index food—they don’t cause sharp spikes to blood glucose. RAISINS AND DIABETES Recently, while answering consumer-related health questions at a Sun-Maid exhibit booth, I was approached by a middle-aged woman. She said “I’m so disappointed, I love Sun-Maid raisins but I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and can’t eat them anymore because they’re high in sugar.” I quickly responded, ” I’ve got great news for you! Let me explain.” The reality is that including raisins in your diet is completely acceptable even when you’re trying to control your blood sugar levels. The key is to balance your intake of carbohydrates with fat and protein to prevent major blood glucose fluctuations. If you’re following a carbohydrate exchange meal plan to help control your diabetes, 2 tablespoons of raisins count as a single carbohydrate exchange, or approximately 15 grams of carbohydrates. You can use one serving of raisins in place of any other carbohydrate source in a given meal, such as a 15-gram serving of grains, starch or dairy. Note: Always check food labels – unlike Sun-Maid, some manufacturers add sugar to raisins. Another important tool for diabetics to use is the glycemic index, which is a measure of how your blood sugar may respond to different foods. Certain types of foods have a low glycemic index, meaning that they do not cause sharp spikes in blood glucose levels. Raisins help contribute to blood glucose control because they have a relatively low glycemic index compared to other food and they also contain fiber and antioxidants. THE PROOF IS IN THE RAISIN PUDDING Researchers studied 4 Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 Diabetes Diet

Type 1 diabetes diet definition and facts In Type 1 diabetes the pancreas can do longer release insulin. The high blood sugar that results can lead to complications such as kidney, nerve, and eye damage, and cardiovascular disease. Glycemic index and glycemic load are scientific terms used to measure he impact of a food on blood sugar. Foods with low glycemic load (index) raise blood sugar modestly, and thus are better choices for people with diabetes. Meal timing is very important for people with type 1 diabetes. Meals must match insulin doses. Eating meals with a low glycemic load (index) makes meal timing easier. Low glycemic load meals raise blood sugar slowly and steadily, leaving plenty of time for the body (or the injected insulin dose) to respond. Skipping a meal or eating late puts a person at risk for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Foods to eat for a type 1 diabetic diet include complex carbohydrates such as brown rice, whole wheat, quinoa, oatmeal, fruits, vegetables, beans, and lentils. Foods to avoid for a type 1 diabetes diet include sodas (both diet and regular), simple carbohydrates - processed/refined sugars (white bread, pastries, chips, cookies, pastas), trans fats (anything with the word hydrogenated on the label), and high-fat animal products. Fats don't have much of a direct effect on blood sugar but they can be useful in slowing the absorption of carbohydrates. Protein provides steady energy with little effect on blood sugar. It keeps blood sugar stable, and can help with sugar cravings and feeling full after eating. Protein-packed foods to include on your menu are beans, legumes, eggs, seafood, dairy, peas, tofu, and lean meats and poultry. The Mediterranean diet plan is often recommended for people with type 1 diabetes because it is full of nut Continue reading >>

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