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What Is Water Diabetes?

Water For Diabetes

Water For Diabetes

How important is it for people with diabetes to stay hydrated? Some evidence shows it’s very important. A study of 3,600 people from France found that those who drank more than 34 ounces of water a day were less likely to develop high blood sugars (hyperglycemia) than those who drank 16 ounces of water or less. Subjects were followed for about nine years. Researchers controlled for age, sex, weight, physical activity, and consumption of beer, sugary drinks, and wine. Why would staying hydrated help control blood sugar? According to an article in The New York Times, being too dry releases a hormone called vasopressin. Vasopressin tells your kidneys to hold onto water and tells the liver release stored blood sugar. It also raises your blood pressure. Extra sugar should be passed out of the body in urine, but if there’s not much water and too much vasopressin in your system, the kidneys don’t make urine. Not drinking water can lead to overeating and weight gain. According to health writer Phyllis Edgerly, a research report from 2001 found that “In 37% [of Americans], the thirst mechanism is so weak that it is often mistaken for hunger.” Dehydration also slows down the body’s metabolism and is a major cause of fatigue. How much water do you need? When you consider that our bodies are roughly 50% (in an elderly person) to 75% (in a newborn baby) water, it makes sense that we need to replace a fair amount each day. Dr. F. Batmanghelidj, MD, writes on his site, “The Water Cure” that, “Through activities of daily living, the average person loses about 3–4 liters (about 10–15 cups) of fluid a day in sweat, urine, exhaled air, and bowel movement. What is lost must be replaced by the fluid we drink and the food we eat. We lose approximately 1–2 liters of wa Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Tweet As water contains no carbohydrate or calories, it is the perfect drink for people with diabetes. Studies have also shown that drinking water could help control blood glucose levels. Lowering blood glucose levels The bodies of people with diabetes require more fluid when blood glucose levels are high. This can lead to the kidneys attempting to excrete excess sugar through urine. Water will not raise blood glucose levels, which is why it is so beneficial to drink when people with diabetes have high blood sugar, as it enables more glucose to be flushed out of the blood. Dehydration and diabetes Having high blood glucose levels can also increase the risk of dehydration, which is a risk for people with diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes insipidus also have a heightened dehydration risk, but this is not linked to high blood glucose levels. Diabetes mellitus Drinking water helps to rehydrate the blood when the body tries to remove excess glucose through urine. Otherwise, the body may draw on other sources of available water, such as saliva and tears. If water access is limited, glucose may not be passed out of the urine, leading to further dehydration. Diabetes insipidus Diabetes inspidus is not associated with high blood glucose levels, but leads to the body producing a large amount of urine. This can leave people regularly feeling thirsty, and at a higher risk of dehydration. Increasing how much water you drink can ease these symptoms, and you may be advised to drink a specific amount of water a day by your doctor. Read more on dehydration and diabetes How much water should we drink? The European Food Safety Authority advises that we take in the following quantities of water on average each day: Women: 1.6 litres - around eight 200ml glasses per day Men: 2 litres Continue reading >>

Drink More Water

Drink More Water

Last month I was taken to the emergency room because my blood pressure dropped. It turned out I had gone low because of dehydration. I’m really embarrassed because I hadn’t realized how important hydration is. It was scary. I could sit up, but only for about a minute. Then I’d have to lie down again. Couldn’t even think about standing (which is hard enough for me on a good day). I was in the ER for about 12 hours getting IV fluids before I was strong enough to go home. Lord knows what it will cost, and all because I didn’t drink enough. I didn’t know I had a viral infection. They found that on a white blood count in the ER. But I did know I was eating lots of fiber, which absorbs water, and not drinking much. I just didn’t know I could get in so much physical trouble from a little dryness. For people with diabetes, the risk of dehydration is greater, because higher than normal blood glucose depletes fluids. To get rid of the glucose, the kidneys will try to pass it out in the urine, but that takes water. So the higher your blood glucose, the more fluids you should drink, which is why thirst is one of the main symptoms of diabetes. According to the British diabetes site diabetes.co.uk, other causative factors for dehydration include insufficient fluid intake, sweating because of hot weather or exercise, alcohol, diarrhea, or vomiting. The symptoms of mild dehydration include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, fatigue, and dark-colored urine. Severe dehydration causes all those symptoms plus low blood pressure, sunken eyes, weak pulse and/or rapid heartbeat, confusion, and lethargy. But many people, especially older people, don’t get these symptoms. It seems that thirst signals become weaker as we age. Diabetes may get people used to thirst s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

During the day, your kidneys filter all your blood many times. Normally, most of the water is reabsorbed, and only a small amount of concentrated urine is excreted. DI occurs when the kidneys cannot concentrate the urine normally, and a large amount of dilute urine is excreted. The amount of water excreted in the urine is controlled by antidiuretic hormone (ADH). ADH is also called vasopressin. ADH is produced in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. It is then stored and released from the pituitary gland. This is a small gland just below the base of the brain. DI caused by a lack of ADH is called central diabetes insipidus. When DI is caused by a failure of the kidneys to respond to ADH, the condition is called nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Nephrogenic means related to the kidney. Central DI can be caused by damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland as a result of: Head injury Infection Loss of blood supply to the pituitary gland Surgery Nephrogenic DI involves a defect in the kidneys. As a result, the kidneys do not respond to ADH. Like central DI, nephrogenic DI is very rare. Nephrogenic DI may be caused by: Certain drugs, such as lithium Genetic problems Continue reading >>

Water Diabetes | Definition Of Water Diabetes By Medical Dictionary

Water Diabetes | Definition Of Water Diabetes By Medical Dictionary

Water diabetes | definition of Water diabetes by Medical dictionary Also found in: Dictionary , Thesaurus , Encyclopedia . Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a disorder that causes the patient to produce tremendous quantities of urine. The massively increased urine output is usually accompanied by intense thirst. The balance of fluid within the body is maintained through a number of mechanisms. One important chemical involved in fluid balance is called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). ADH is produced by the pituitary, a small gland located at the base of the brain. In a healthy person and under normal conditions, ADH is continuously released. ADH influences the amount of fluid that the kidneys reabsorb into the circulatory system and the amount of fluid that the kidneys pass out of the body in the form of urine. Production of ADH is regulated by the osmolality of the circulating blood. Osmolality refers to the concentration of dissolved chemicals (such as sodium, potassium, and chloride; together called solute) circulating in the fluid base of the blood (plasma). When there is very little fluid compared to the concentration of solute, the pituitary will increase ADH production. This tells the kidneys to retain more water and to decrease the amount of urine produced. As fluid is retained, the concentration of solute will normalize. At other times, when the fluid content of the blood is high in comparison to the concentration of solute, ADH production will decrease. The kidneys are then free to pass an increased amount of fluid out of the body in the urine. Again, this will allow the plasma osmolality to return to normal. Diabetes insipidus occurs when either the amount of ADH produced by the pituitary is below normal (central DI), or the kidneys' ability to respond to ADH is defecti Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

What are the types of diabetes insipidus? Central Diabetes Insipidus The most common form of serious diabetes insipidus, central diabetes insipidus, results from damage to the pituitary gland, which disrupts the normal storage and release of ADH. Damage to the pituitary gland can be caused by different diseases as well as by head injuries, neurosurgery, or genetic disorders. To treat the ADH deficiency that results from any kind of damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary, a synthetic hormone called desmopressin can be taken by an injection, a nasal spray, or a pill. While taking desmopressin, a person should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. The drug prevents water excretion, and water can build up now that the kidneys are making less urine and are less responsive to changes in body fluids. Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus results when the kidneys are unable to respond to ADH. The kidneys' ability to respond to ADH can be impaired by drugs-like lithium, for example-and by chronic disorders including polycystic kidney disease, sickle cell disease, kidney failure, partial blockage of the ureters, and inherited genetic disorders. Sometimes the cause of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus is never discovered. Desmopressin will not work for this form of diabetes insipidus. Instead, a person with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus may be given hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) or indomethacin. HCTZ is sometimes combined with another drug called amiloride. The combination of HCTZ and amiloride is sold under the brand name Moduretic. Again, with this combination of drugs, one should drink fluids only when thirsty and not at other times. Dipsogenic Diabetes insipidus Dipsogenic diabetes insipidus is caused by a defect in or damage to the thirst Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Overview Diabetes insipidus is a rare condition where you produce a large amount of urine and often feel thirsty. Diabetes insipidus isn't related to diabetes mellitus (usually just known as diabetes), but it does share some of the same signs and symptoms. The two main symptoms of diabetes insipidus are: passing large amounts of urine, even at night (polyuria) In very severe cases of diabetes insipidus, up to 20 litres of urine can be passed in a day. Read more about the symptoms of diabetes insipidus. When to seek medical advice You should always see your GP if you're feeling thirsty all the time. Although it may not be diabetes insipidus, it should be investigated. Also see your GP if you're: passing more urine than normal – most healthy adults pass urine four to seven times in a 24 hour period passing small amounts of urine at frequent intervals – sometimes, this can occur along with the feeling that you need to pass urine immediately Children tend to urinate more frequently because they have smaller bladders. However, seek medical advice if your child urinates more than 10 times a day. Your GP will be able to carry out a number of tests to help determine what's causing the problem. Read more about diagnosing diabetes insipidus. What causes diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is caused by problems with a hormone called vasopressin (AVP), also called antidiuretic hormone (ADH). AVP plays a key role in regulating the amount of fluid in the body. It's produced by specialist nerve cells in a part of the brain known as the hypothalamus. AVP passes from the hypothalamus to the pituitary gland where it's stored until needed. The pituitary gland releases AVP when the amount of water in the body becomes too low. It helps retain water in the body by reducing the amount Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Tweet Diabetes insipidus, often shortened to DI, is a rare form of diabetes that is not related to blood sugar-related diabetes mellitus, but does share some of its signs and symptoms. Diabetes insipidus is simply excessive urination (polyuria) and complications thereof, caused by an antidiuretice hormone called a vasopressin. Read on to find out more about what diabetes insipidus is, how it affects the body, the different forms of the disease, and how it is diagnosed and treated. What are the symptoms of diabetes insipidus? Diabetes Insipidus leads to frequent urination, and this is the most common and clear symptom. In extreme cases, urination can be in excess of 20 litres per day. A secondary symptom is increased thirst, as a result of passing so much water. If this is not met, then dehydration can occur which, in turn, can lead to: Cracked skin Confusion Dizziness and even Unconsciousness Children suffering from the condition may become irritable or listless, with fever and vomiting also possible. How does diabetes insipidus compare with diabetes mellitus? Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus should not be confused. The two conditions are unrelated, with diabetes insipidus a completely different type of illness. Diabetes mellitus is also far more common. Diabetes mellitus occurs due to insulin resistance or insulin deficiency and subsequent high blood glucose levels. Diabetes Insipidus on the other hand develops as a result of the stilted production of a hormone in the brain, which is released to stop the kidneys producing so much urine in order to retain water. Without this hormone, water is not retained and the kidneys constantly work to their maximum capacity. The word "Mellitus" tagged onto the main form of diabetes comes from an old word roughly meaning "to Continue reading >>

Water Diabetes In Dogs

Water Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes Insipidus in Dogs Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disorder that affects water metabolism, preventing the body from conserving water and releasing too much of it. This condition is characterized by increased urination, dilute urine (so-called insipid, or dull urine), and increased thirst and drinking. This disease is not related to diabetes mellitus (insulin diabetes). Symptoms and Types There are two main types of DI that affect dogs: neurogenic (or central diabetes insipidus) and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In neurogenic DI, the cause is due to a lack of the hormone vasopressin, which regulates the body's retention of water. The release of vasopressin is produced and regulated by the hypothalamus (in the brain), so a dysfunction in its release may be due to a head injury, or to a tumor in the brain. Vasopressin is produced in the hypothalamus into the connected pituitary gland, and is then released into the bloodstream. A lack of vasopressin may be due to a failure in the hypothalamus, or a failure in the pituitary gland. A significant number of cases is idiopathic. Nephrogenic DI, meanwhile, can be caused by a deficiency of antidiuretic hormone (ADH), which functions to stimulate the capillary muscles and reduce the flow of urine, effectively conserving water for the body's various functions. The cause is found in the kidneys and their inability to respond appropriately to ADH, allowing too much water from the body to escape into the urine. This is typically an acquired condition, and may be due to amyloidosis of the kidney, cysts on the kidney, or an imbalance of electrolytes. Other common symptoms seen in dogs with DI include: Causes Inadequate secretion of antidiuretic hormone ADH Congenital defect Unknown causes Trauma Cancer Renal insensitivity to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

On this page: What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that occurs when a person's kidneys pass an abnormally large volume of urine that is insipid—dilute and odorless. In most people, the kidneys pass about 1 to 2 quarts of urine a day. In people with diabetes insipidus, the kidneys can pass 3 to 20 quarts of urine a day. As a result, a person with diabetes insipidus may feel the need to drink large amounts of liquids. Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the kidneys normally filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through tubes called ureters. The bladder stores urine. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. How is fluid regulated in the body? A person's body regulates fluid by balancing liquid intake and removing extra fluid. Thirst usually controls a person’s rate of liquid intake, while urination removes most fluid, although people also lose fluid through sweating, breathing, or diarrhea. The hormone vasopressin, also called antidiuretic hormone, con Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Print Overview Diabetes insipidus (die-uh-BEE-teze in-SIP-uh-dus) is an uncommon disorder that causes an imbalance of water in the body. This imbalance leads to intense thirst even after drinking fluids (polydipsia), and excretion of large amounts of urine (polyuria). While the names diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus sound similar, they're not related. Diabetes mellitus — which can occur as type 1 or type 2 — is the more common form of diabetes. There's no cure for diabetes insipidus, but treatments are available to relieve your thirst and normalize your urine output. Symptoms The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes insipidus are: Extreme thirst Excretion of an excessive amount of diluted urine Depending on the severity of the condition, urine output can be as much as 16 quarts (about 15 liters) a day if you're drinking a lot of fluids. Normally, a healthy adult will urinate an average of less than 3 quarts (about 3 liters) a day. Other signs may include needing to get up at night to urinate (nocturia) and bed-wetting. Infants and young children who have diabetes insipidus may have the following signs and symptoms: Unexplained fussiness or inconsolable crying Trouble sleeping Fever Vomiting Diarrhea Delayed growth Weight loss When to see a doctor See your doctor immediately if you notice the two most common signs of diabetes insipidus: excessive urination and extreme thirst. Causes Diabetes insipidus occurs when your body can't regulate how it handles fluids. Normally, your kidneys remove excess body fluids from your bloodstream. This fluid waste is temporarily stored in your bladder as urine, before you urinate. When your fluid regulation system is working properly, your kidneys conserve fluid and make less urine when your body water is decreased, suc Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus is characterised by extreme thirst and the passing of large amounts of urine. It is caused by the lack of sufficient vasopressin, a hormone produced by the brain that instructs the kidneys to retain water. Treatment options include vasopressin replacement. On this page: Diabetes insipidus is characterised by extreme thirst and the passing of vast amounts of urine. It is caused by insufficient vasopressin, a hormone produced by the brain that instructs the kidneys to retain water. Without enough vasopressin, too much water is lost from the body in urine, which prompts the affected person to drink large amounts of fluids in an attempt to maintain their fluid levels. In severe cases, a person may pass up to 30 litres of urine per day. Without treatment, diabetes insipidus can cause dehydration and, eventually, coma due to concentration of salts in the blood, particularly sodium. The name of this condition is a little misleading, since diabetes insipidus has nothing to do with diabetes mellitus (a condition characterised by high blood sugar levels), apart from the symptoms of thirst and passing large volumes of urine. The word diabetes means 'to go through' - describing the excessive urination. Insipidus means the urine is tasteless, whereas mellitus suggests it is sweet from its sugar content. This terminology dates back to a time when physicians literally dipped a finger in the patient's urine and tested its taste. Not a diagnostic method much in use today! Symptoms The symptoms of diabetes insipidus include: Extreme thirst that can't be quenched (polydipsia) Excessive amounts of urine (polyuria) Colourless urine instead of pale yellow Waking frequently through the night to urinate Dry skin Constipation Weak muscles Bedwetting. Too much water is lost in Continue reading >>

Water

Water

The amount of fluid we need varies from person to person – age, climate, diet and physical activity all have an influence. Intakes of 1.5 to 2 litres of fluids a day are recommended in temperate climates and this includes water and other drinks like squash, fruit juices, tea and coffee. Some of our fluid requirement comes from the food we eat, rather than drinks – this counts too. Water accounts for a large percentage of what makes up the human body, for example: Blood is 83% water Muscles are 75% water The brain is 74% water Bone is 22% water The role of water Water is necessary for your body to digest and absorb vitamins and nutrients. It also detoxifies the liver and kidneys, and carries away waste from the body. And when it comes to digestion … it can’t happen without water. Fibre alone cannot aid proper digestive function by itself. Without the presence of water good fibre goes bad and causing constipation and extreme discomfort. If you’re dehydrated, your blood is literally thicker, and your body has to work much harder to cause it to circulate. As a result, the brain becomes less active, it’s hard to concentrate, and your body feels fatigued. Benefits of water Improve your energy Increase your mental and physical performance Remove toxins and waste products from the body Keep skin healthy and glowing Help you lose weight Reduce headaches and dizziness Allow for proper digestion Factors that influence water needs Daily water losses We lose about 700ml of water from our bodies every day, through the skin and when we breathe. We lose another 100ml through faeces, about 1.5 litres as urine and 200ml in normal perspiration. So, even living and breathing in a temperate climate requires us to take in about 2 litres a day just to stay hydrated.Its important t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus - Central

Diabetes Insipidus - Central

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is an uncommon condition in which the kidneys are unable to prevent the excretion of water. Diabetes insipidus is a different disease than diabetes, though both share common symptoms excessive urination and thirst. Central diabetes insipidus is a form of DI that occurs when the body has a lower than normal amount of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). ADH is also called vasopressin. ADH is produced in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus. It is then stored and released from the pituitary gland. This is a small gland at the base of the brain. ADH controls the amount of water excreted in urine. Without ADH, the kidneys do not work properly to keep enough water in the body. The result is a rapid loss of water from the body in the form of dilute urine. This results in the need to drink large amounts of water due to extreme thirst and to make up for excessive water loss in the urine (as much as 4 gallons or 15 liters a day). The reduced level of ADH may be caused by damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. This damage may be due to surgery, infection, inflammation, tumor, or injury to the brain. Sometimes the cause is unknown. In rare cases, central diabetes insipidus is caused by a genetic problem. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes Insipidus: Causes, Symptoms And Treatment

Diabetes insipidus is a condition where the body loses too much fluid through urination, causing a significant risk of dangerous dehydration as well as a range of illnesses and conditions. There are two forms of the disease: nephrogenic diabetes insipidus and central diabetes insipidus (also known as neurogenic diabetes insipidus). A number of factors have been linked to the development of diabetes insipidus, which may also occur in pregnancy or with the use of certain medications. Establishing the cause of the problem can help determine the most appropriate treatment to support the regulation of water balance in the body. Diabetes insipidus is a condition that can be managed successfully. Contents of this article: What is diabetes insipidus? An uncommon condition, diabetes insipidus is a disorder affecting the regulation of body fluid levels. Two key symptoms resemble those of the more common forms of diabetes that affect blood sugar levels (diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2).1-5 People with diabetes insipidus produce excessive amounts of urine (polyuria), resulting in frequent urination and, in turn, thirst (polydipsia). However, the underlying cause of these two symptoms is quite different from the causes in types 1 and 2 diabetes. In diabetes mellitus, elevated blood sugar prompts the production of large volumes of urine to help remove the excess sugar from the body. In diabetes insipidus, it is the body's water balance system itself that is not working properly. Here are some key points about diabetes insipidus. More detail and supporting information is in the body of this article. Diabetes insipidus is a condition where the body fails to properly control water balance, resulting in excessive urination. Diabetes insipidus can be caused by low or absent secretion of t Continue reading >>

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