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What Is Undiagnosed Diabetes

The Mysterious Symptoms Of Undiagnosed Diabetes: Diabetes Blog Week Day 1

The Mysterious Symptoms Of Undiagnosed Diabetes: Diabetes Blog Week Day 1

“Let’s kick off Diabetes Blog Week by talking about the diabetes causes and issues that really get us fired up.” Before my husband, Mike, was diagnosed with diabetes, he was – to my mind – a certified tough guy. He’d been a paratrooper, had a black belt in some kind of kickboxing/karate thing that I (clearly) know nothing about, and he ran long distances. Whenever I was with him, I felt safe and protected, kind of like having a husband and a Rottweiler all rolled into one. (The previous sentence is intended as a compliment.) And if you’d asked me to come up with a thousand adjectives to describe Mike, “weak” would not have made the list. But then one day he got sick. We’d been in Atlanta with our baby for Mike’s cousin’s wedding, and had to cancel our flight home because Mike said he was too sick to fly. I had never heard Mike say there was something he couldn’t do. In fact, just a year earlier we’d been in Paris together and the night before our flight home, Mike got food poisoning from a dish of raw sea slugs. (There must be a sexy way to say sea slugs in French.) We had just a few hours between the dinner and our flight home, and Mike felt stomach cramps so severe, he was doubled over in pain. I suggested we stay an extra night in Paris until he felt better. He would hear nothing of it. When it was time to go, he pulled himself together, carried all the luggage, and off we went. He was not about to have his butt kicked by slimy sea slugs, and though he felt utterly horrid on the inside, you couldn’t tell on the outside. So when Mike said he was too sick to fly home after his cousin’s wedding, you can probably imagine how shocking his statement was, especially since no one could see his sickness. He didn’t have a fever and though he d Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Have Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes

One of the greatest dangers of type 2 diabetes is that it can be slow and silent. Many people with the condition don’t experience any symptoms at all, even though their unbalanced blood sugar is already affecting their cells and tissue. You might be one of those people. How can you tell if you're at risk for developing type 2 diabetes? You may be more likely to develop the condition if you: Are overweight, with a body mass index (BMI) of 25 or higher Are inactive Are age 45 or older Have a family history of type 2 diabetes Are African-American, Hispanic, American Indian, Asian-American, or a Pacific Islander Have low levels of HDL, or the “good” cholesterol Have high levels of triglycerides (a type of fat) in your blood Although the telltale signs of type 2 diabetes may develop slowly over many years, the condition will cause symptoms for many people. Do any of these sound familiar? Increased thirst Frequent urination Increased hunger Unexplained weight loss Extreme fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Sores that are slow to heal Skin, bladder, or gum infections Whether you're experiencing any of these symptoms or not, uncontrolled levels of high blood sugar over time can lead to tissue damage throughout your body, from your eyes to your toes. Uncontrolled Diabetes Is Scary — and Even Deadly Type 2 diabetes damages essential systems in your body: your blood vessels, nerves, or both. The consequences of uncontrolled diabetes can be very serious, and some can eventually be fatal. They include: Infections Amputations due to infections in the feet These complications sound scary — and they are. Fortunately, controlling your blood-glucose levels can help prevent many of these secondary problems, or at least manage them if they have already developed. Take Action Tod Continue reading >>

One Third Of Diabetes In The U.s. Is Undiagnosed

One Third Of Diabetes In The U.s. Is Undiagnosed

(Reuters Health) - Diabetes affects up to 14% of the U.S. population - an increase from nearly 10% in the early 1990s - yet over a third of cases still go undiagnosed, according to a new analysis. Screening seems to be catching more cases, accounting for the general rise over two decades, the study authors say, but mainly whites have benefited; for Hispanic and Asian people in particular, more than half of cases go undetected. "We need to better educate people on the risk factors for diabetes - including older age, family history and obesity - and improve screening for those at high risk," lead study author Andy Menke, an epidemiologist at Social and Scientific Systems in Silver Spring, Maryland, said by email. Globally, about one in nine adults has diagnosed diabetes, and the disease will be the seventh leading cause of death by 2030, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have type 2 diabetes. Menke and colleagues estimated the prevalence of diabetes (hemoglobin A1c 6.5% or higher) and pre-diabetes (hemoglobin A1c between 5.7% and 6.4%) using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) collected on 2,781 adults in 2011 to 2012 and an additional 23,634 adults from 1988 to 2010. While the prevalence of diabetes increased over time in the overall population, gains were more pronounced among racial and ethnic minorities, the study found. About 11% of white people have diabetes, the researchers calculated, compared with 22% of non-Hispanic black participants, 21% of Asians and 23% of Hispanics. Among Asians, 51% of those with diabetes were unaware of it, and the same was true for 49% of Hispanic people with the condition. An additional 38% of adults fell into the pre-diabetes category. Added to the prevalence of diabete Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Diabetes: Does It Matter?

Undiagnosed Diabetes: Does It Matter?

Copyright 2001 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The 1998 Canadian clinical practice guidelines for the management of diabetes lowered the cutoff point for diagnosing diabetes mellitus from a fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level of 7.8 to 7.0 mmol/L. We studied the prevalence and clinical outcomes of undiagnosed and diagnosed diabetes within specific ranges of FPG among a cohort of subjects recruited in 1990. In 1990 a representative sample of 2792 adult residents of Manitoba participated in the Manitoba Heart Health Survey, which included measurement of FPG and a question about each participant's past history of diabetes. Individuals who would now be classified as having undiagnosed diabetes under the new criteria were not considered as such in 1990. Through data linkage with the provincial health care utilization database, the use of health care by these individuals was tracked and compared with that of individuals whose diabetes had been diagnosed and with that of normoglycemic individuals over an 8-year period subsequent to the survey. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes in the adult population of Manitoba was 2.2%. Undiagnosed cases accounted for about one-third of all diabetes cases. Individuals with undiagnosed diabetes had an unfavourable lipid profile and higher blood pressure and obesity indices than normoglycemic individuals. Individuals who satisfied the new criteria for diabetes but remained undiagnosed had an additional 1.35 physician visits per year (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.931.96) and were more likely to be admitted to hospital at least once (odds ratio 1.23, 95% CI 0.403.79), compared with normoglycemic individuals. Undiagnosed cases represent the unseen but clinically import Continue reading >>

7 Early Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Early Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a preventable disease that affects more than 9 percent of the U.S. population, or about 29 million people. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter — some 8 million people — remain undiagnosed. With complications including nerve damage, kidney damage, poor blood circulation, and even death, it’s important for us all to know the early signs of type 2 diabetes. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is a condition that makes it difficult for the body to manage glucose levels in the blood — something typically regulated by a hormone known as insulin. This can be because your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, the cells don’t respond to insulin correctly, or a combination of both. Obesity is a major risk factor for the disease. While most common in adults, it is increasingly being diagnosed in children, in part due to the childhood obesity epidemic. Long-term uncontrolled blood sugar levels can lead to complications like nerve damage, kidney damage, hearing impairment, skin problems, eye damage, and heart disease. Some of these complications, like poor circulation, can eventually lead to amputations, most commonly of the feet or legs. Preventing these complications requires a diagnosis and consistent treatment. Identifying the early symptoms of type 2 diabetes can make this possible. Learn More About Type 2 Diabetes The early signs of this disease are not always obvious. They may develop slowly over time, making them hard to identify. Many are asymptomatic. Because they can worsen over a period of years, type 2 diabetes may remain undiagnosed longer than other, more obvious conditions. 1. Frequent Urination Also known as polyuria, frequent and/or excessive urination is a sign that your blood sugar is Continue reading >>

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Early Symptoms Of Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Easy To Miss

Type 2 diabetes is a sneaky devil. Early on, the warning signs can be hard to spot and people sometimes chalk them up to stress or fatigue, and shrug them off. But screening tests and understanding your risk can help people spot diabetes sooner and get the treatment they need, say experts. "The main thing about early diabetes is that you can have abnormal blood sugar for quite some time and be fairly asymptomatic," Dr. Susan Spratt, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine, told CBS News. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes - that's nearly 1 out of 10 U.S. adults - and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a quarter of them are undiagnosed. Millions of others are considered at high risk for developing diabetes. Spratt said some people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes may experience dry mouth, excessive thirst, and they may urinate more frequently. Blurry vision can occur, too. Cuts and bruises may be slow to heal and you may feel tingling, pain, or numbness in your hands and feet, according to the American Diabetes Association. Feeling hungry, even after eating, and experiencing extreme fatigue are symptoms, as well. What's happening in the body when type 2 diabetes is lurking? The condition develops when the body becomes resistant to insulin or when the pancreas stops producing enough insulin. It's not clear why this happens, but genetics and factors such as weight and a sedentary lifestyle can play into the equation, Mayo Clinic experts say. The body needs insulin to survive - it's secreted into the bloodstream via the pancreas. When insulin circulates, it enables sugar to enter cells and lowers the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. With type 2 diabetes, instead of insulin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

Diabetes Symptoms You Can’t Afford To Ignore & What You Can Do About Them

In the U.S., diabetes — or diabetes mellitus (DM) — is full-blown epidemic, and that’s not hyperbole. An estimated 29 million Americans have some form of diabetes, nearly 10 percent of the population, and even more alarming, the average American has a one in three chance of developing diabetes symptoms at some point in his or her lifetime. (1) The statistics are alarming, and they get even worse. Another 86 million people have prediabetes, with up to 30 percent of them developing type 2 diabetes within five years. And perhaps the most concerning, about a third of people who have diabetes — approximately 8 million adults — are believed to be undiagnosed and unaware. That’s why it’s so vital to understand and recognize diabetes symptoms. And there’s actually good news. While there’s technically no known “cure” for diabetes — whether it’s type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes — there’s plenty that can be done to help reverse diabetes naturally, control diabetes symptoms and prevent diabetes complications. The Most Common Diabetes Symptoms Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results from problems controlling the hormone insulin. Diabetes symptoms are a result of higher-than-normal levels of glucose (sugar) in your blood. With type 1 diabetes, symptoms usually develop sooner and at a younger age than with type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes also normally causes more severe symptoms. In fact, because type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms can be minimal in some cases, it sometimes can go diagnosed for a long period of time, causing the problem to worsen and long-term damage to develop. While it’s still not entirely known how this happens, prolonged exposure to high blood sugar can damage nerve fibers that affect the blood vessels, heart, e Continue reading >>

Tired, Thirsty And Always Need The Loo? You Could Be One Of The Hundreds Of Thousands Of People With Undiagnosed Diabetes

Tired, Thirsty And Always Need The Loo? You Could Be One Of The Hundreds Of Thousands Of People With Undiagnosed Diabetes

Hundreds of thousands of people have no idea they are suffering from diabetes, worrying new figures show. The vast majority of people are unable to identify the main signs of the disease, including weight loss, slow healing of cuts and bruises, blurred vision, being thirsty, using the bathroom more often and being tired. In fact, only one in 100 people could identify the main symptoms and only one in five would be able to spot a single one, according to a survey to coincide with World Diabetes Day tomorrow. In 2014 the World Health Organisation estimated that 9 per cent of adults around the world suffer from the disease. It said 1.5 million deaths worldwide were directly caused by diabetes in 2012. In the UK, 3.9 million people are diagnosed with diabetes each year, whilst an estimated 590,000 are unaware that they have the disease.This is estimated to rise to five million by 2025. Globally, there were an estimated 370 million people with diabetes in 2012 - and nearly 5 million deaths due to diabetes and diabetes-related illnesses, World Health Organisation figures show. It's estimated that around 90 per cent suffer the type 2 form of the disease. In Type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to keep glucose levels normal. In Type 1, the pancreas stops producing insulin altogether. A number of lifestyle factors, including weight, are known to increase a person's risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. But according to the new survey, by law firm Stephensons, more than 80 per cent of people would fail to spot weight loss as a sign of diabetes, despite this being listed by the NHS as one of the main symptoms. In fact, one in three would wrongly identify weight gain as a symptom, due to increased awareness of the link between obesity and diabetes. Excessive Continue reading >>

Lee: 'undiagnosed Diabetes Nearly Killed Me'

Lee: 'undiagnosed Diabetes Nearly Killed Me'

Lee, a young slim guy, on the dangers of ignoring the symptoms of diabetes. There are two popular myths about diabetes. One is that it is caused by obesity and doesn't affect slim people. The other is that it's not serious because it can be managed with diet or injections. Neither are true. Ignoring the symptoms of diabetes is very dangerous - as 35 year old Lee found out. There's more about the symptoms in our Diabetes FAQs. This is Lee's story. I had all the classic symptoms - weight loss, thirst, thrush but I did nothing about it. I did not like going to the doctor so I would just put it off. I was divorced in 2003 and lost a lot of weight so put it down to stress. I started to drink a lot as I was newly single again, so that took care of the thirst! I remember not feeling too well but as I was partying a lot I would just put it down to hangovers, and the thrush, well, I did not want to see anyone about that... I thought I had caught something and did not want to know. This carried on for about a year or so then levelled out. It just became the normal thing - I stayed slim, didn't exercise and drank heavily. I had erection problems Fast forward, I started getting erection problems. Again, I was too embarrassed to see anyone and put it down to the drink. I was having diarrhoea, started losing more weight, feeling very tired. I was always drinking water, my mouth was very dry, I was urinating all the time, I then had a rash start on my legs that did not go away. I was embarrassed and maybe I did not want to know what was wrong. I then had a boil on my left leg and within a couple of days two more appeared. I was feeling very poorly and couldn't go to work. Then one day I could not get my breath and an ambulance was called and I was rushed to hospital. It was May 2007 a Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Diabetes In Us Adults Declines To 11%

Undiagnosed Diabetes In Us Adults Declines To 11%

Undiagnosed Diabetes in US Adults Declines to 11% Just over 10% of adults in the United States who have diabetes are not aware of it, new research suggests. This lower rate of one in 10 is "in stark contrast to previously published national estimates and statements in current clinical practice guidelines, which suggest that one-quarter to one-third of diabetes cases are undiagnosed," say Elizabeth Selvin MD, from the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, and colleagues, in their paper published online October 24 in the Annals of Internal Medicine. They explain that the common belief that up to a third of all diabetes cases remain undiagnosed is due to previous estimates from epidemiologic studies that have relied on a single blood test to define hyperglycemia; it is now known that there was high variability among the biochemical tests used to define diabetes. Hence, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) currently recommends that, in the absence of a clear clinical diagnosis (overt symptoms of diabetes or hyperglycemic crisis), a second blood test is required to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes. This second test can be from a new blood sample, or it can be two different tests from the same sample eg, HbA1c and fasting glucose levels and if the results of the two tests are above clinical thresholds, this also confirms the diagnosis. The researchers therefore reanalyzeddata from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), applying these stricter criteria and identified participants who had undiagnosed diabetes defined as elevated HbA1C and fasting plasma glucose levels where the second test "confirmed" the diabetes diagnosis. "When a confirmatory definition is used, undiagnosed diabetes is a relatively small fraction of the total diabetes Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

Undiagnosed Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

More than 25 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, indicates the American Diabetes Association, and of those, only 18.8 million have been formally diagnosed with the disease…. In fact, some 7 million people live with undiagnosed diabetes, and as many as 79 million people in the United States live with prediabetes – elevated blood glucose levels, which are almost always a precursor to type 2 diabetes. Lawrence Barker, PhD Associate Director for Science in CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation, stated that, “In 2010, 35 percent or 79 million Americans aged 20 years or older had prediabetes (50 percent of those aged 65 years or older). Similarly, 36 percent of Mexican American adults were estimated to have prediabetes in 2010,” “Prediabetes has few obvious physical signs. Rather than look for physical signs, one should consider one’s risk factors (such as obesity, sedentary lifestyle, family history of diabetes, and age) and then have one’s prediabetes status assessed by a health care provider.” Because there are not many symptoms associated with prediabetes, when it blossoms into type 2 diabetes, many individuals are unaware they have a very serious disease. Prevention is key. Barker explains individuals with type 2 diabetes can go years without exhibiting outward symptoms, and because of that, just as with prediabetes, it is important for a person to know the risk factors for developing the disease. “Rather than focusing on symptoms, people who are at high risk of type 2 diabetes are better off seeking assessment by their health care provider. “Obesity puts one at greater risk of developing prediabetes and, if one has prediabetes, at greater risk for developing type 2 diabetes,” said Barker. “Many factors influence one’s risk of developin Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes Symptoms: When Diabetes Symptoms Are A Concern

Diabetes symptoms are often subtle. Here's what to look for — and when to consult your doctor. Early symptoms of diabetes, especially type 2 diabetes, can be subtle or seemingly harmless — that is, if you even have symptoms at all. Over time, however, you may develop diabetes complications, even if you haven't had diabetes symptoms. In the United States alone, more than 8 million people have undiagnosed diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. But you don't need to become a statistic. Understanding possible diabetes symptoms can lead to early diagnosis and treatment — and a lifetime of better health. If you're experiencing any of the following diabetes signs and symptoms, see your doctor. Excessive thirst and increased urination Excessive thirst (also called polydipsia) and increased urination (also known as polyuria) are classic diabetes symptoms. When you have diabetes, excess sugar (glucose) builds up in your blood. Your kidneys are forced to work overtime to filter and absorb the excess sugar. If your kidneys can't keep up, the excess sugar is excreted into your urine, dragging along fluids from your tissues. This triggers more frequent urination, which may leave you dehydrated. As you drink more fluids to quench your thirst, you'll urinate even more. Fatigue You may feel fatigued. Many factors can contribute to this. They include dehydration from increased urination and your body's inability to function properly, since it's less able to use sugar for energy needs. Weight loss Weight fluctuations also fall under the umbrella of possible diabetes signs and symptoms. When you lose sugar through frequent urination, you also lose calories. At the same time, diabetes may keep the sugar from your food from reaching your cells — leading to constant Continue reading >>

Rate Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In The United States

Rate Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In The United States

Rate of Undiagnosed Diabetes in the United States Rate of Undiagnosed Diabetes in the United States The prevalence of total diabetes in the United States for 1999 to 2014 was 9.3%. The percentage of adults with undiagnosed diabetes in the United States is lower than previously estimated, according to a cross-sectional study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.1 The common belief that up to one-third of all diabetes cases remain undiagnosed may be overestimated due to epidemiological studies that do not use confirmatory testing.2-7 Researchers reviewed data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted from 1988 to 1994 (n=7385) and 4-year survey cycles from 1999 to 2014 (n=17,045) to calculate estimates of undiagnosed diabetes in the United States. Elevated levels of fasting glucose (7.0 mmol/L [126 mg/dL]) and hemoglobin HbA1C (6.5%) in people without diagnosed diabetes was used to define cases of confirmed undiagnosed diabetes. The percentage of total diabetes cases that were undiagnosed decreased from 16.3% in 1988-1994 to 10.9% in 2011-2014, while the prevalence of total (diagnosed and confirmed undiagnosed) diabetes increased from 5.5% (9.7 million adults) to 10.8% (25.5 million adults) in these two time periods, respectively. Overweight or obese adults, older adults, racial/ethnic minorities (including Asian Americans), and adults without health insurance or access to health care were more likely to have undiagnosed diabetes. Continue reading >>

Former Facebook Engineer Dies Of Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Former Facebook Engineer Dies Of Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes

Former Facebook Engineer Dies of Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes On September 26, 2017, former software engineer at Facebook, Michael Cohen, died suddenly at the age of 25 from undiagnosed Type 1 diabetes. At the time of his death, Cohen was a doctoral candidate at MIT. He passed away in Berkeley, California while attending a workshop at the UC Berkeley through the Simons Institute for the Theory of Computing. It was believed that he had a stomach flu with symptoms of fatigue and vomiting, and missed nearly a week of the seminar, staying at a rented airbnb flat in Silicon Valley. When he couldnt be reached for several days, authorities were called and found Cohen. He was pronounced dead onsite. Cohens official cause of death was diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) from diabetes mellitus. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks the healthy insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. The cause is unknown, though there may be environmental or heredity triggers for the disease. As the beta cells are destroyed, insulin levels drop and blood sugar becomes elevated. Untreated, the person with Type 1 diabetes runs the risk of entering diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening condition that leads to diabetic coma and death. Essentially, when the body cant access sugar, it begins to break down muscle and fats, which release ketones into the body. Excessive ketones in the system destroys vital organs. Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms usually develop after ketone accumulation and represent the late manifestation of acidosis (ketone/acid accumulation in the body), explains Marina Basina, MD, a lead endocrinologist at Stanford University. Nausea and vomiting is typically present in up to 2/3 of patients in DKA. In individuals with no prior history of diabetes, Continue reading >>

Global Estimates Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In Adults - Sciencedirect

Global Estimates Of Undiagnosed Diabetes In Adults - Sciencedirect

Volume 103, Issue 2 , February 2014, Pages 150-160 Global estimates of undiagnosed diabetes in adults Author links open overlay panel JessicaBeagleya The prevalence of diabetes is rapidly increasing worldwide. Type 2 diabetes may remain undetected for many years, leading to severe complications and healthcare costs. This paper provides estimates of the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus (UDM), using available data from high quality representative population-based sources. Data sources reporting both diagnosed and previously undiagnosed diabetes were identified and selected according to previously described IDF methodology for diabetes in adults (aged 2079). Countries were divided into 15 data regions based on their geographic IDF Region and World Bank income classification. The median UDM proportion was calculated from selected data sources for each of data region. The number of UDM cases in 2013 was calculated from country, age and sex-specific estimates of known diabetes cases and data region-specific UDM proportion. Of 744 reviewed data sources, 88 sources representing 74 countries had sufficient information and were selected for generation of estimates of UDM. Globally, 45.8%, or 174.8 million of all diabetes cases in adults are estimated to be undiagnosed, ranging from 24.1% to 75.1% across data regions. An estimated 83.8% of all cases of UDM are in low- and middle-income countries. At a country level, Pacific Island nations have the highest prevalence of UDM. There is a high proportion of UDM globally, and especially in developing countries. Further high-quality studies of UDM are needed to strengthen future estimates. Continue reading >>

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