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What Is Type 2 Diabetes And How Can It Be Prevented?

3 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes For You And Your Kids

3 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes For You And Your Kids

And it’s not just a few people who have to constantly worry about keeping their blood sugar levels just right. In fact, over 30 million people in the US have diabetes, or about 1 in 10 Americans. Not only this, but “another 84 million adults in the United States are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes.” (1) Type 1 and type 2 diabetes both have genetic factors involved, but type 2 diabetes can actually be prevented. This November is National Diabetes Month, the perfect time to learn how you and your kids can minimize your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Here are a few places to start. Eating smaller portions and making healthy food choices can really reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. (2) A simple way to control your portion sizes is using the “plate method.” For a 9-inch plate, half of the plate should be non-starchy vegetables, a quarter should be protein such as meat or beans, and a quarter should be a grain or starch (3). This method can also help people who are already either prediabetic or diabetic. You can experiment with different food combinations on the American Diabetes Association’s interactive website, Create Your Plate (4). Getting the recommended 30 minutes of exercise 5 days a week can do a lot to help prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes (5). Help your kids stay active by finding fun activities to enjoy together, whether it’s playing catch or going for a walk. You can also find ways to get moving more throughout the day by doing simple things like taking the stairs or having a “movement break” at work (6). Switching out your soda, juice, or sports drink for a glass of water can do a lot to lower your overall sugar intake. This will help you maintain a healthier weight and reduce your risk of getting type Continue reading >>

How To Delay Or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

How To Delay Or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

2015 Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of cases of diabetes, in which blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be prevented, even among people who have already been diagnosed with prediabetes, a condition where the blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not yet in the diabetic range. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), found that prediabetic participants who made lifestyle changes were 58 percent less likely to develop the disease after three years. The goal of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) Diabetes Prevention and Control Program is to educate the public on how to prevent and manage diabetes, as well as improve access to high-quality diabetes care. Who Is at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes? A number of characteristics increase a person’s risk for type 2 diabetes, as well as prediabetes, a condition which 37 percent of American adults have according to the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report. Those who are most at risk for diabetes: Have high blood pressure or cholesterol; Have an immediate family history of diabetes; Are overweight or obese (you can use the CDC’s adult BMI calculator to determine if you are in one of these categories); Are African American, Native American, Asian/Pacific Islander, or Hispanic; Are not physically active; Are more than 45 years old; or Have experienced gestational diabetes or have given birth to an infant weighing more than 9 pounds. If left untreated, diabetes can cause serious health problems, including the amputation of lower limbs, heart attack and stroke, loss of vision, and kidney failure. What Can You Do to Pre Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Type 2 diabetes prevention tips and facts While genetics plays an important role in the development of diabetes, an individual still has the ability to influence their health to prevent type 2 diabetes. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This article focuses on ways to control risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People should watch their weight and exercise on a regular basis to help reverse prediabetes, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diet is important because it helps with weight loss. Some foods such as nuts in small amounts provide health benefits in blood sugar regulation. There is no single recommended diabetes prevention diet, but following a sound nutrition plan and maintaining a healthy weight are important steps in preventing the disease. Exercise is even more beneficial with weight loss in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Smoking is harmful in many ways including increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are medications available that have been shown in large trials to delay or prevent the onset of overt diabetes. Metformin (Glucophage) is recommended by the American Diabetes Association for prevention of diabetes in high-risk people. The coming years will be very exciting regarding the advances in the field of prevention of diabetes. However, the cornerstone of therapy will likely remain a healthy lifestyle. There are two major forms of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. This article focuses specifically on the prevention of type 2 diabetes since there is no know way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This form of diabetes is virtually a pandemic in the United States. This information reviews the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes and reviews key points regardi Continue reading >>

Find Out If You Are At Risk & How You Can Try & Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Find Out If You Are At Risk & How You Can Try & Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, it is best if it is diagnosed early. You can prevent many problems with diabetes if you know about it early and take action to manage it. If you find you have a high risk of developing diabetes but don’t yet have it, you can take action that may prevent you ever getting diabetes. Some groups of people are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes: European descent aged 40 years or older Diabetes in your family (grandparents, parents, brothers or sisters) Maori, Asian, Middle Eastern or Pacific Island descent aged 30 years or older High blood pressure Overweight (especially if you carry most of your weight around your waist) Diagnosed as having pre-diabetes (also known as impaired glucose tolerance) – this occurs when the glucose (sugar) in your blood is higher than normal, but not high enough to be called diabetes If you gave birth to a large baby weighing more than 9lbs / 4kg, or have had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) High blood glucose in pregnancy High blood glucose in the past Type 2 diabetes is diagnosed through a blood test. If you think you are at risk, talk to your doctor who can organise a test. How to try and avoid type 2 diabetes To try and avoid type 2 diabetes developing, make the following changes: Stay physically active and get regular exercise. Aim for at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each day. Brisk walking, swimming, cycling, Marae activities, dancing and mowing the lawns all count. Remember you don’t have to do all of your daily exercise at once. For example, three brisk walks for 10 minutes in the day may be more manageable than one of 30 minutes. Click here to read more. Eat healthy food. Click here to read more. Keep your weight in a healthy range. Understanding type 2 diabetes Typ Continue reading >>

Diet And Exercise Are Effective In Preventing Type 2 Diabetes, Task Force Finds

Diet And Exercise Are Effective In Preventing Type 2 Diabetes, Task Force Finds

Programs that promote dietary change and physical activity are effective in reducing the likelihood that people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes will do so, say new recommendations from the US Community Preventive Services Task Force.1 The task force arrived at its recommendations after a systematic review of 53 studies that described 66 programs.2 Participants in such programs were also more likely to see an improvement in diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors, such as excess weight and elevated blood glucose levels, lipid levels, and blood pressure, the panel said. “The beneficial effects of combined programs were seen across a wide range of intensity levels,” the task force said. The … Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

What Is The Science Behind Type 2 Diabetes In Terms Of Prevention And Treatment?

What Is The Science Behind Type 2 Diabetes In Terms Of Prevention And Treatment?

The causes of diabetes type 2 are combinations of lifestyle and genetic factors. We can’t modify genetic factors, but we can modify lifestyle. Lifestyle factors are important to the development of type 2 diabetes, including obesity and being overweight ( body mass index of greater than 25) lack of physical activity, poor diet stress, and urbanization Excess body fat is associated with 30% of cases in those of Chinese and Japanese descent, 60–80% of cases in those of European and African descent, and 100% of cases in Pima Indians and Pacific Islanders. Among those who are not obese, a high waist–hip ratio is often present. Smoking appears to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Dietary factors also influence the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks in excess is associated with an increased risk. The type of fats in the diet are important, with saturated fats and trans fatty acids increasing the risk,( and polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat decreasing the risk.) Eating a lot of white rice appears to play a role in increasing risk. A lack of exercise is believed to cause 7% of cases. Persistent organic pollutants may play a role. prevention: proper nutrition and regular exercise. Intensive lifestyle measures may reduce the risk by over half. The benefit of exercise occurs regardless of the person's initial weight or subsequent weight loss. High levels of physical activity reduce the risk of diabetes by about 28%. Evidence for the benefit of dietary changes alone, however, is limited, with some evidence for a diet high in green leafy vegetables and some for limiting the intake of sugary drinks. In those with impaired glucose tolerance, diet and exercise either alone or in combination with metformin or acarbose may de Continue reading >>

15 Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

15 Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

To mark World Health Day's 'Beat Diabetes' theme, Áilín Quinlan gets advice from Professor Seamus Sreenan, consultant endocrinologist at Connolly Hospital and medical advisor for Diabetes Ireland, on how to avoid developing type 2 diabetes There are two common forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is not preventable, while the latter one can often be avoided. This year's World Health Day, taking place April 7, is marked by the theme 'Beat Diabetes'. In type 2 diabetes, your genes influence your chances of developing the condition, which is caused by insulin resistance (the inability of the insulin to work properly). However, it's very important to understand that in type 2 diabetes, genetic factors take a back seat to behavioral and lifestyle factors - the Nurses' Health Study, a US study running since 1976, suggests that 90pc of type 2 diabetes in women can be attributed to excess weight, lack of exercise, a less-than-healthy diet, smoking, and too much alcohol. Research also shows that about two-thirds of all cases of type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented by making simple everyday lifestyle changes. With type 1 diabetes, which is not preventable, the body's immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells. To date, no effective treatment has been developed to prevent the damage caused by the immune system which leads to this condition. Here are 15 ways you can reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes: 1 Watch your weight Being overweight increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by making the body resistant to insulin. As little as 5-10pc weight loss improves insulin resistance, thereby reducing the risk of diabetes, says Prof Sreenan. Therefore if you're overweight or obese, the advice is simple - lose weight. 2 Watch your waistline Car Continue reading >>

In Women With Gestational Diabetes, Exercise Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

In Women With Gestational Diabetes, Exercise Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Women who have gestational diabetes — a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually ends after the baby's delivery — can lower their risk of later developing type 2 diabetes by starting up an exercise routine, a new study has found. Having gestational diabetes may provide an opportunity for patients to recognize their increased risk of type 2 diabetes and take steps to prevent it, the researchers said. In the study, the researchers looked at more than 4,500 women who had gestational diabetes in the past, and followed them from 1991 to 2007, to examine whether increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviors (such as watching TV) lowered their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. By the end of the study period, 635 women had developed type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that women who increased their activity level so they were moderately exercising for 150 minutes weekly (or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise) had a 47 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared with women who didn't change their activity levels. Conversely, the more time women spent watching TV, the higher their risk of type 2 diabetes was, according to the study, published today (May 19) in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. [9 Healthy Habits You Can Do in 1 Minute (Or Less)] "These findings suggest a hopeful message to women with a history of gestational diabetes, although they are at exceptionally high risk of type 2 diabetes: Promoting an active lifestyle may lower the risk," the researchers wrote in their study. Gestational diabetes is somewhat common: The condition occurs in about 2 to 10 percent of pregnancies. It is also a sign of higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life — women who have had gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 per Continue reading >>

The Only Way To Prevent Or Reverse Type Ii Diabetes

The Only Way To Prevent Or Reverse Type Ii Diabetes

It has taken decades, but medical professionals are finally starting to give diet and exercise for the prevention and reversal of type 2 diabetes some well-deserved attention. "... the new study can give people with the disease hope that through lifestyle changes, they could end up getting off medication and likely lowering their risk of diabetes-related complications," Reuters Health reports. The research, also featured by MedPage Today, demonstrates that diet and physical activity are the answer diabetics have been searching for. It's worth noting that I do not at all agree with some of the dietary recommendations given to the participants in this study. For example, I believe including healthy saturated fats and avoiding processed liquid meal replacements would be a wise move. The Study The researchers randomly assigned diabetic participants, who were also overweight or obese, to an intensive program of diet and exercise, in which they were urged to cut calories down to 1,200-1,800 calories per day and engage in nearly three hours of physical exercise per week. After one year, 11.5 percent of the program participants no longer needed medication to keep their blood sugar levels below the diabetes threshold. Only two percent of the non-intervention group experienced any significant improvement in their condition. Those who'd had been diagnosed with diabetes more recently saw greater blood sugar improvements on the program. Ditto for those who lost the most amount of weight and/or made the greatest progress in raising their fitness level. The lifestyle intervention group also managed to sustain their remission better over the following 3 years. The Only Way to Avoid And/Or Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Amazingly, one in four Americans has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Reading Time: 3 minutes. >> Summary: People can delay or prevent type 2 diabetes with a healthy diet and exercise. Medications also work, but are less effective. The ways to delay or prevent type 2 diabetes include diet, exercise, and in some cases, medications. Don’t take risks with your health – all three of these tactics should only be carried out under the supervision of a qualified physician. Research shows that some prevention strategies are more successful than others in preventing type 2 diabetes. How Can I Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Some of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes are beyond your control, including genetics and growing older. Thankfully, many risk factors are within your control. The controllable factors include being overweight or obese, a high fat / high sugar diet, and having prediabetes. Risk Factors Beyond Our Control Genetics – If either of your parents has type 2 diabetes, it increases your risk of developing the disease by a fraction. Having other siblings or both parents with type 2 diabetes increases your risk even further. You can’t choose your parents. The only way to address this risk is by being proactive in preventing type 2 diabetes and getting tested more often. Growing Older – As one grows older, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases, requiring one to work harder at prevention. Thankfully, nothing is being done to prevent Americans from growing older. The only way to address the increased risk is by getting tested more often and by being proactive in preventing type 2 diabetes. Reversing the Risk Factors Dr. Edward Gregg is chief of the epidemiology and statistics branch at the U.S. CDC. He is also the lead author of a study which estimated that 40% of Americans alive today will get diabetes, as was discussed in an earlier Continue reading >>

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Prevented In Uk General Practice? A Lifestyle-change Feasibility Study (isaiah)

Can Type 2 Diabetes Be Prevented In Uk General Practice? A Lifestyle-change Feasibility Study (isaiah)

Background The increasing incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus is attributed to increasing weight, reduced physical activity, and poor diet quality. Lifestyle change in patients with pre-diabetes can reduce progression to diabetes but this is difficult to achieve in practice. Aim To study the effectiveness of a lifestyle-change intervention for pre-diabetes in general practice. Method Participants were 33 patients with pre-diabetes. The intervention was a 6-month delayed entry comparison of usual treatment with a lifestyle-change programme: increased exercise and diet change, either reduction in glycaemic load, or reduced-fat diet. The main outcome measures were weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, fasting glucose, lipid profile, and nutrition. Results A statistically significant difference was observed between control and intervention groups in three markers for risk of progression to diabetes (weight (P<0.03), BMI (P<0.03), and waist circumference (P<0.001)). No significant differences in fasting glucose or lipid profiles were seen. Aggregated data showed a statistically non-significant improvement in all the measures of metabolic risk of progression to diabetes in the low-glycaemic-load group when compared with a low-fat-diet group (P>0.05). Significant total energy, fat, and carbohydrate intake reduction was achieved and maintained in both groups. Conclusion A lifestyle-change intervention feasibility programme for pre-diabetic patients was implemented in general clinical practice. The potential of a low-glycaemic-load diet to be more effective than a low-fat diet in promoting change in the features associated with progression to diabetes is worthy of further investigation. The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been rising steadily in the UK Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes

How To Prevent Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? If you have diabetes, your blood sugar levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, this happens because your body does not make enough insulin, or it does not use insulin well (this is called insulin resistance). If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you might be able to prevent or delay developing it. Who is at risk for type 2 diabetes? Many Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes. Your chances of getting it depend on a combination of risk factors such as your genes and lifestyle. The risk factors include Having prediabetes, which means you have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes Being age 45 or older A family history of diabetes Being African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander Having given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more Having acanthosis nigricans, a skin condition in which your skin becomes dark and thick, especially around your neck or armpits Smoking How can I prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes? If you are at risk for diabetes, you may be able to prevent or delay getting it. Most of the things that you need to do involve having a healthier lifestyle. So if you make these changes, you will get other health benefits as well. You may lower your risk of other diseases, and you will probably feel better and have more energy. The changes are Losing weight and keeping it off. Weight control is an important part of diabetes prevention. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose between 10 to 20 pounds. And once you lose the weight, it is important that you don't gain it back. Following Continue reading >>

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

The Deliberate Lies They Tell About Diabetes

By some estimates, diabetes cases have increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years. One in four Americans now have either diabetes or pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose) Type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and virtually 100 percent reversible, simply by implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle changes, one of the most important of which is eliminating sugar (especially fructose) and grains from your diet Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling. Elevated insulin levels are not only symptoms of diabetes, but also heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity Diabetes drugs are not the answer – most type 2 diabetes medications either raise insulin or lower blood sugar (failing to address the root cause) and many can cause serious side effects Sun exposure shows promise in treating and preventing diabetes, with studies revealing a significant link between high vitamin D levels and a lowered risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome By Dr. Mercola There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either. Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic The latest diabetes statistics1 echo an increase in diabetes ca Continue reading >>

> Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

> Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

If you play sports, chances are you slide on a facemask, strap on a shin guard, or stretch before a practice or game to prevent injuries. You can't predict what will happen in every situation, but a lot of times, taking a few safety precautions can save you some pain. Taking some preventive steps sometimes works for health problems like diabetes, too. The things you do now could help prevent problems later, depending on the type of diabetes. Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose, a sugar that is the body's main source of fuel. Your body needs glucose to keep running. Here's how it should work. You eat. Glucose from the food gets into your bloodstream. Insulin helps the glucose get into the body's cells. Your body gets the energy it needs. The pancreas is a long, flat gland in your belly that helps your body digest food. It also makes insulin. Insulin is kind of like a key that opens the doors to the cells of the body. It lets the glucose in. Then the glucose can move out of the blood and into the cells. But if someone has diabetes, the body either can't make insulin (this is called type 1 diabetes) or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should (this is called type 2 diabetes). The glucose can't get into the cells normally, so the blood sugar level gets too high. Lots of sugar in the blood makes people sick if they don't get treatment. Type 1 diabetes can't be prevented. Doctors can't even tell who will get it and who won't. In type 1 diabetes, a person's immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. No one knows for sure why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. Genes are like instructions for how the body should look and work that are passed on by parents to their kids. But j Continue reading >>

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