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What Is Type 2 Diabetes And How Can It Be Prevented?

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Reading Time: 3 minutes. >> Summary: People can delay or prevent type 2 diabetes with a healthy diet and exercise. Medications also work, but are less effective. The ways to delay or prevent type 2 diabetes include diet, exercise, and in some cases, medications. Don’t take risks with your health – all three of these tactics should only be carried out under the supervision of a qualified physician. Research shows that some prevention strategies are more successful than others in preventing type 2 diabetes. How Can I Prevent Type 2 Diabetes? Some of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes are beyond your control, including genetics and growing older. Thankfully, many risk factors are within your control. The controllable factors include being overweight or obese, a high fat / high sugar diet, and having prediabetes. Risk Factors Beyond Our Control Genetics – If either of your parents has type 2 diabetes, it increases your risk of developing the disease by a fraction. Having other siblings or both parents with type 2 diabetes increases your risk even further. You can’t choose your parents. The only way to address this risk is by being proactive in preventing type 2 diabetes and getting tested more often. Growing Older – As one grows older, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases, requiring one to work harder at prevention. Thankfully, nothing is being done to prevent Americans from growing older. The only way to address the increased risk is by getting tested more often and by being proactive in preventing type 2 diabetes. Reversing the Risk Factors Dr. Edward Gregg is chief of the epidemiology and statistics branch at the U.S. CDC. He is also the lead author of a study which estimated that 40% of Americans alive today will get diabetes, as was discussed in an earlier Continue reading >>

The Only Way To Prevent Or Reverse Type Ii Diabetes

The Only Way To Prevent Or Reverse Type Ii Diabetes

It has taken decades, but medical professionals are finally starting to give diet and exercise for the prevention and reversal of type 2 diabetes some well-deserved attention. "... the new study can give people with the disease hope that through lifestyle changes, they could end up getting off medication and likely lowering their risk of diabetes-related complications," Reuters Health reports. The research, also featured by MedPage Today, demonstrates that diet and physical activity are the answer diabetics have been searching for. It's worth noting that I do not at all agree with some of the dietary recommendations given to the participants in this study. For example, I believe including healthy saturated fats and avoiding processed liquid meal replacements would be a wise move. The Study The researchers randomly assigned diabetic participants, who were also overweight or obese, to an intensive program of diet and exercise, in which they were urged to cut calories down to 1,200-1,800 calories per day and engage in nearly three hours of physical exercise per week. After one year, 11.5 percent of the program participants no longer needed medication to keep their blood sugar levels below the diabetes threshold. Only two percent of the non-intervention group experienced any significant improvement in their condition. Those who'd had been diagnosed with diabetes more recently saw greater blood sugar improvements on the program. Ditto for those who lost the most amount of weight and/or made the greatest progress in raising their fitness level. The lifestyle intervention group also managed to sustain their remission better over the following 3 years. The Only Way to Avoid And/Or Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Amazingly, one in four Americans has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes Continue reading >>

How Can I Prevent Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Prevent Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Question:How can I prevent type 1 or type 2 diabetes? Answer:There are usually two flavors of diabetes. Type 1 used to be called juvenile onset diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. And it is caused by an attack by your own immune system -- (it's) called an autoimmune disease -- on the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. So what happens is that over time, usually during childhood, this autoimmune attack attacks your pancreas just like it would happen if it was a bacterium and it destroys these beta cells. There is no way, currently, that we know of, to prevent type 1 diabetes. Children or young adults or even older people who get it, there is really little that we can do to either slow down or prevent the development of this disease. Type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult onset diabetes because it most often affects people beyond the age of 45 or 50, is the really the epidemic form of diabetes and it is associated with increasing weight, obesity, decreasing life style. In addition, it more commonly occurs in people of racial minorities. So for example, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans and American Indians are more likely to get this form of diabetes. Since the risk factors that lead to this form of diabetes include increasing weight and decreasing activity levels, it shouldn't be surprising that there have been a number of studies that have been performed, including one called the Diabetes Prevention Program, that showed that you can prevent this disease from occurring if you lose weight and if you increase your activity level. In the Diabetes Prevention Program, the volunteers there lost about 7 percent, which was about for them about 15 pounds of weight and increased their activity level by walking about 30 minutes most evenings or Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Every day we make choices that affect our health. Take these important five steps to make your lifestyle healthier and to start to prevent or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and pre-diabetes: Maintain a healthy weight Include a good balance of activity and healthy diet Talk to your healthcare provider about what a healthy weight is for you Eat a healthy, balanced diet Eat a diet with lots of variety Eat more fibre Eat less fat and salt Limit the amount of alcohol you drink Select appropriate portion sizes Ensure regular physical activity Be active at least 30 minutes every day Include activities that build endurance, strength and flexibility Find activities that you enjoy and that include your family Don't smoke If you smoke, it's never too late to quit Avoid second-hand smoke Keep your health in check Get enough sleep and rest Be active - physical activity is a great way to reduce stress Manage high blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose If You Already Have Diabetes Living a healthy lifestyle is also very important in preventing or delaying diabetes complications. Also visit the Living with Diabetes section. Additional Resources Adapted from material prepared by the Canadian Diabetes Association. This FAQ appeared originally on the Canadian Health Network Web site and has been edited for publication by the Public Health Agency of Canada. Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Preventing Diabetes Naturally (type 2, Diet, Causes, Symptoms)

Type 2 diabetes prevention tips and facts While genetics plays an important role in the development of diabetes, an individual still has the ability to influence their health to prevent type 2 diabetes. There is no known way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This article focuses on ways to control risk factors for type 2 diabetes. People should watch their weight and exercise on a regular basis to help reverse prediabetes, and prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diet is important because it helps with weight loss. Some foods such as nuts in small amounts provide health benefits in blood sugar regulation. There is no single recommended diabetes prevention diet, but following a sound nutrition plan and maintaining a healthy weight are important steps in preventing the disease. Exercise is even more beneficial with weight loss in the prevention of type 2 diabetes. Smoking is harmful in many ways including increasing the risk of cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There are medications available that have been shown in large trials to delay or prevent the onset of overt diabetes. Metformin (Glucophage) is recommended by the American Diabetes Association for prevention of diabetes in high-risk people. The coming years will be very exciting regarding the advances in the field of prevention of diabetes. However, the cornerstone of therapy will likely remain a healthy lifestyle. There are two major forms of diabetes - type 1 and type 2. This article focuses specifically on the prevention of type 2 diabetes since there is no know way to prevent type 1 diabetes. This form of diabetes is virtually a pandemic in the United States. This information reviews the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes and reviews key points regardi Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

> Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

> Can Diabetes Be Prevented?

If you play sports, chances are you slide on a facemask, strap on a shin guard, or stretch before a practice or game to prevent injuries. You can't predict what will happen in every situation, but a lot of times, taking a few safety precautions can save you some pain. Taking some preventive steps sometimes works for health problems like diabetes, too. The things you do now could help prevent problems later, depending on the type of diabetes. Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose, a sugar that is the body's main source of fuel. Your body needs glucose to keep running. Here's how it should work. You eat. Glucose from the food gets into your bloodstream. Insulin helps the glucose get into the body's cells. Your body gets the energy it needs. The pancreas is a long, flat gland in your belly that helps your body digest food. It also makes insulin. Insulin is kind of like a key that opens the doors to the cells of the body. It lets the glucose in. Then the glucose can move out of the blood and into the cells. But if someone has diabetes, the body either can't make insulin (this is called type 1 diabetes) or the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should (this is called type 2 diabetes). The glucose can't get into the cells normally, so the blood sugar level gets too high. Lots of sugar in the blood makes people sick if they don't get treatment. Type 1 diabetes can't be prevented. Doctors can't even tell who will get it and who won't. In type 1 diabetes, a person's immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. No one knows for sure why this happens, but scientists think it has something to do with genes. Genes are like instructions for how the body should look and work that are passed on by parents to their kids. But j Continue reading >>

Eat Well To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Eat Well To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

There are up to 30,000 people with undetected type 2 diabetes in Ireland and approximately 146,000 people with undetected pre-diabetes, according to findings in a recent VHI Healthcare study. If you are one of the people who are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes you can minimise this risk by eating a healthy diet and getting moderate exercise, becoming more active and maintaining a healthy weight. Type 2 diabetes usually develops slowly in adulthood and may show no signs or symptoms. It is progressive and can sometimes be treated with diet and exercise, especially in the early stages. But more often people with type 2 diabetes may require anti-diabetic medicine and some will go on to need insulin injections. In type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin or it produces insulin but it becomes ‘resistant’ to the levels of insulin it produces. The more risk factors or symptoms someone has the more likely they are to have undetected diabetes or pre-diabetes. If you are worried, you should speak to your GP and tell them why you think you may have type 2 diabetes. A simple diabetes test will ease any worries you may have. Healthy diet reduces risk Being overweight is one of the main risk factors for developing diabetes. If you fall into the at-risk category you can reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes if you make sure to eat a healthy diet and lose weight if necessary. The key to healthy eating is eating regularly, watching your serving size and following a healthy eating plan that is low in refined sugars and fat. This means: Choosing lower fat options when eating meat, poultry, dairy products and spreads Enjoying a good variety of fresh fruit and vegetables Getting most of your energy from unrefined and whole grain foods Keeping hi Continue reading >>

7 Strategies To Prevent And Treat Type 2 Diabetes

7 Strategies To Prevent And Treat Type 2 Diabetes

Drug-free strategies to prevent and treat type 2 diabetes Without changes in diet and exercise habits, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that one in three Americans will develop type 2 diabetes. The good news is that most cases can be prevented. The disease used to be called adult-onset diabetes, because it was rare among people under age 30, but the name changed as incidence soared among younger people during the past two decades. What Is Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is an inability of the body to use insulin, the hormone that manages levels of blood sugar. As a result, levels of blood sugar become chronically elevated, a stage called prediabetes. When levels of blood sugar reach even higher levels, the condition becomes full-blown diabetes. What Can Be Done According to the CDC, type 2 diabetes can most often be prevented. A landmark study called the Diabetes Prevention Program, supported by the National Institutes of Health and published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2002, compared the effects of a diet and exercise, and a commonly used diabetes drug (metformin), among more than 3,200 people who were overweight and had prediabetes. Compared to a placebo: Adults following a diet and exercise program reduced risk for diabetes by an average of 58 percent, and among those age 60 and older, by 71 percent. People taking metformin also reduced their risk of diabetes, but not as much: by only 31 percent. In addition to lowering blood sugar, the diet and exercise program produced additional benefits: reduced blood pressure and other risk factors for heart disease, more so than the medication. Weight loss between 5 and 7 percent of body weight reduced risk for diabetes. In all the years since then, the lessons learned have not been widely Continue reading >>

How To Delay Or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

How To Delay Or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

2015 Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90 to 95 percent of cases of diabetes, in which blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be prevented, even among people who have already been diagnosed with prediabetes, a condition where the blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not yet in the diabetic range. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), found that prediabetic participants who made lifestyle changes were 58 percent less likely to develop the disease after three years. The goal of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health (DPH) Diabetes Prevention and Control Program is to educate the public on how to prevent and manage diabetes, as well as improve access to high-quality diabetes care. Who Is at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes? A number of characteristics increase a person’s risk for type 2 diabetes, as well as prediabetes, a condition which 37 percent of American adults have according to the CDC’s National Diabetes Statistics Report. Those who are most at risk for diabetes: Have high blood pressure or cholesterol; Have an immediate family history of diabetes; Are overweight or obese (you can use the CDC’s adult BMI calculator to determine if you are in one of these categories); Are African American, Native American, Asian/Pacific Islander, or Hispanic; Are not physically active; Are more than 45 years old; or Have experienced gestational diabetes or have given birth to an infant weighing more than 9 pounds. If left untreated, diabetes can cause serious health problems, including the amputation of lower limbs, heart attack and stroke, loss of vision, and kidney failure. What Can You Do to Pre Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Alzheimer’s & Type 3 Diabetes

How To Prevent Alzheimer’s & Type 3 Diabetes

Some experts are calling Alzheimer’s disease (AD) “Type 3 diabetes,” because it relates to problems with insulin function. Preventing this condition combines good diabetes self-management with care for the brain. Alzheimer’s is a progressive disease that destroys memory and other important mental functions. People with Type 2 diabetes are 50–65% more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than people with normal blood sugars. Approximately half of people with Type 2 will go on to develop Alzheimer’s in their lifetime. Thinking of Type 3 diabetes as another complication of Type 2 gives some ideas on how to prevent it. Here are 10 possible approaches for avoiding Alzheimer’s disease: 1. Diabetes medications might help. Metformin seems to. A study at Tulane University followed 6,000 veterans with diabetes and showed that the longer a person used metformin, the lower his chances of developing Alzheimer’s and other dementias. People who took metformin for more than 4 years had only one quarter the risk of these diseases. Newer diabetes drugs in the class known as GLP-1 receptor agonists have been found to improve memory and prevent Alzheimer’s changes in mice and preliminary human studies. 2. Food plays a significant role. Unfortunately, different experts have different prescriptions on what to eat. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, says, “Balance your blood sugar with a whole-foods, low-glycemic diet. You can achieve this by taking out the bad stuff (refined carbs, sugar, alcohol, caffeine, processed foods, dairy, and inflammatory, omega-6 rich oils) and putting in the good stuff (healthy fats like avocados, walnuts, almonds and cashews, grass-fed meats, pastured chicken and eggs, olive and coconut oil).” Neal Barnard, director of th Continue reading >>

15 Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

15 Steps To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

To mark World Health Day's 'Beat Diabetes' theme, Áilín Quinlan gets advice from Professor Seamus Sreenan, consultant endocrinologist at Connolly Hospital and medical advisor for Diabetes Ireland, on how to avoid developing type 2 diabetes There are two common forms of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 is not preventable, while the latter one can often be avoided. This year's World Health Day, taking place April 7, is marked by the theme 'Beat Diabetes'. In type 2 diabetes, your genes influence your chances of developing the condition, which is caused by insulin resistance (the inability of the insulin to work properly). However, it's very important to understand that in type 2 diabetes, genetic factors take a back seat to behavioral and lifestyle factors - the Nurses' Health Study, a US study running since 1976, suggests that 90pc of type 2 diabetes in women can be attributed to excess weight, lack of exercise, a less-than-healthy diet, smoking, and too much alcohol. Research also shows that about two-thirds of all cases of type 2 diabetes can be delayed or prevented by making simple everyday lifestyle changes. With type 1 diabetes, which is not preventable, the body's immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells. To date, no effective treatment has been developed to prevent the damage caused by the immune system which leads to this condition. Here are 15 ways you can reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes: 1 Watch your weight Being overweight increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by making the body resistant to insulin. As little as 5-10pc weight loss improves insulin resistance, thereby reducing the risk of diabetes, says Prof Sreenan. Therefore if you're overweight or obese, the advice is simple - lose weight. 2 Watch your waistline Car Continue reading >>

Diagnosing “pre-diabetes” Early Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Diagnosing “pre-diabetes” Early Can Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is taking a toll on our nation. Nearly 24 million Americans suffer from the life-threatening disease in which the body can no longer make enough insulin or properly use the insulin it does make to control glucose levels in our blood stream. An estimated six million more individuals don’t even know they have it. “Diabetes is a disease that affects all of your internal organs by affecting the vascular supply,” says Denise Bruckerhoff, D.O., a board-certified internal medicine physician with USMD Midlothian. “Because high blood sugar increases inflammation in your arteries, your organs receive less blood than they need to stay healthy and function properly. With diabetes you have a greater risk for stroke, heart attack, kidney failure, blindness, and advanced memory loss. Diabetes also makes it difficult for wounds to heal, often allowing gangrene to develop. In some cases, poor circulation can even lead to amputation of extremities.” Out of the 24 million Americans who have diabetes, another 57 million adults have “pre-diabetes”—also know as insulin resistance. How can you know if you are one of them? While there can be a variety of symptoms—increased thirst or hunger, fatigue, blurry vision, frequent infections, inflammation of the gums, and frequent urination—often times patient’s are asymptomatic. A simple blood test can diagnose insulin resistance. During a fasting blood sugar test, a sample of blood is drawn the morning after an overnight fast. A blood sugar level less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered normal, while 100 to 125 mg/dL is considered insulin resistant, and 126 mg/dL or higher on two separate tests is considered diabetes. However, more frequently, blood is drawn for a hemoglobin A1C test to measure an i Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Diabetes

How To Prevent Diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes? If you have diabetes, your blood sugar levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, this happens because your body does not make enough insulin, or it does not use insulin well (this is called insulin resistance). If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you might be able to prevent or delay developing it. Who is at risk for type 2 diabetes? Many Americans are at risk for type 2 diabetes. Your chances of getting it depend on a combination of risk factors such as your genes and lifestyle. The risk factors include Having prediabetes, which means you have blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes Being age 45 or older A family history of diabetes Being African American, Alaska Native, American Indian, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Islander Having given birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more Having acanthosis nigricans, a skin condition in which your skin becomes dark and thick, especially around your neck or armpits Smoking How can I prevent or delay getting type 2 diabetes? If you are at risk for diabetes, you may be able to prevent or delay getting it. Most of the things that you need to do involve having a healthier lifestyle. So if you make these changes, you will get other health benefits as well. You may lower your risk of other diseases, and you will probably feel better and have more energy. The changes are Losing weight and keeping it off. Weight control is an important part of diabetes prevention. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 10 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose between 10 to 20 pounds. And once you lose the weight, it is important that you don't gain it back. Following Continue reading >>

Save Your Kids From Diabetes

Save Your Kids From Diabetes

According to the CDC, every year 13,000 children are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. More disturbing, the CDC reports that there are more and more children being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes each year -- the type of diabetes that normally impacts those over age 40. The problem? Obesity is putting kids at risk for this disease. So, what can parents do to reduce their children's risk? Step one: Prevention starts at home Experts agree that diabetes prevention starts at home. "You can do everything about your child's weight. You can control what your child eats," says Doug Varrieur, author of the Fat to Skinny series of books. One key step? Parents need to explain to their kids the problem. "Educate the child so the child understands what is happening within [their] body," says Varrieur ... his advice? Break it into simple terms that they will understand, something that his books do. What else? Step 2: Get kids involved in choosing healthy foods The first step in fighting off diabetes is taking preventative measures with eating, says registered dietitian Jennifer Haas of Nova Medical & Urgent Care Center, Inc. in Ashburn, VA. "It really comes down to what the parents are feeding them," says Haas. "Simple sugars are really the culprit." That includes things like soda, cookies, chips and processed baked goods. Making healthier alternatives available is simply a must for families trying to cut their child's risk of diabetes. Varrieur says that families need to rally behind their kids and overhaul the kitchen contents. "Change what's in the house. ... Buy products that are going to satisfy your child's desire for flavor," says Varrieur. How do you make the change from unhealthy foods to healthy ones? Haas suggests that parents ease a transition from unhealthy foods to healthi Continue reading >>

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