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What Is The Worst Type Of Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

Question: What is the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes? Answer: There are several types of diabetes; I'm going to discuss the two main types: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 formerly called juvenile onset diabetes occurs typically before the age of 20. Individuals with type 1 diabetes are usually thin, and the cause of type 1 diabetes is that the pancreas, the organ that secretes insulin, is destroyed by autoantibodies, that's why people with type 1 diabetes always need insulin, either injected or through an insulin pump. Type 1 diabetes occurs in about 10-15 percent of all the diabetics in the country. Now, the most common type of diabetes is what we call type 2, formerly called adult onset. Type 2 diabetics are usually heavy, usually diagnosed after the age of 35. Now, the cause of type 2 diabetes is quite different from type 1. The cause of type 2 diabete is primarily a complicated medical condition called 'insulin resistance.' In fact, in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, there's plenty of insulin around, it just doesn't work well. To treat type 2 diabetes, we typically use lifestyle, and that may work alone -- just diet and exercise -- then we may need oral medications, and it is not uncommon for someone with type 2 diabetes to eventually need insulin, either with or without the oral medications. Now, type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 85 to 90 percent of all the diabetics in the country. The other important thing that needs to be said is that type 2 diabetes is associated with heart disease, and that's why it's so important to not only treat the glucose levels, but also to attack blood pressure and cholesterol levels as well. We know that type 2 diabetes runs very strongly from generation to generation, and we also know that we can preve Continue reading >>

The Risks Of Treating Diabetes With Drugs Are Far Worse Than The Disease

The Risks Of Treating Diabetes With Drugs Are Far Worse Than The Disease

Drugs in type 2 diabetics will nearly universally cause more damage than good Drugs used to lower blood sugar may increase your risk of death from all causes by 19 percent, and your risk of cardiovascular mortality by 43 percent You can prevent, treat and even reverse type 2 diabetes by making straightforward lifestyle changes By Dr. Mercola Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes, and up to 95 percent of these cases are type 2 diabetes. Unlike type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease that shuts down your body's insulin production, type 2 diabetes is directly caused by lifestyle. Whereas type 1 diabetics need to inject insulin several times a day to stay alive, type 2 diabetics do NOT need drugs. In fact, taking drugs for type 2 diabetes can be far worse than the disease itself! Diabetes Drugs Increase Your Risk of Death Drugs are widely prescribed for type 2 diabetics to help lower blood sugar levels, but a new meta-analysis of 13 randomized controlled trials involving more than 33,000 people showed that this treatment is not only ineffective, it's dangerous as well. Treatment with glucose-lowering drugs actually showed the potential to increase your risk of death from heart-related, and all other causes. "The overall results of this meta-analysis do not show a benefit of intensive glucose lowering treatment on all cause mortality or cardiovascular death. A 19% increase in all cause mortality and a 43% increase in cardiovascular mortality cannot be excluded." Lessons Learned from Avandia: Diabetes Drugs Can be Deadly Avandia (rosiglitazone) is the poster child for what is wrong with the drug treatment of type 2 diabetes. After hitting the market in 1999, a 2007 study in the New England Journal of Medicine linked it to a 43 percent increased risk of heart attac Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods For Controlling Your Type Ii Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods For Controlling Your Type Ii Diabetes

Although type II diabetes is a serious disease, it doesn’t need to control your life. Managing your diet is one of the most important steps to improving type II diabetes symptoms. Although it can be difficult to adjust your eating habits, taking the time to be mindful of everyday food choices goes a long way. Here are the best and worst foods for type II diabetes symptoms. The Best Superfoods to Add to Your Type II Diabetes Diet Many people with type II diabetes are worried that their diagnosis means losing out on flavor in their diets. Fortunately, it is easy to add flavor to your life without adding fat or sugar. Here are great foods for a type II diabetes diet. Tomatoes Red meat is loaded with saturated fats, which can worsen your type II diabetes symptoms. Fortunately, losing out on red meat doesn’t need to mean missing out on the flavors. Tomatoes are high in glutamate, the amino acid that gives red meat its strong umami taste. Cooking tomatoes also unlocks an antioxidant called lycopene, which lowers risks of heart disease. Garlic Garlic is the perfect example of a high-flavor, low-calorie food. Adding more garlic to your diet can add strong taste and decrease your risks for heart-disease and high blood pressure, two issues often associated with type II diabetes. Legumes Having type II diabetes means finding new protein sources to replace fatty red meats. Oily fish, chicken breast, and tofu are all excellent choices. With high levels of fiber and low levels of fat, legumes like beans, peas, and lentils may be the best pick. They’re also one of the most affordable proteins at your local grocery store. Broccoli This controversial green veggie has gotten a bad rap for too long. The problem with broccoli isn’t with its taste but its preparation. The typical me Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chan Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page, we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, let’s review the difference between the two types. The Difference Between Type 1 & Type 2 Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar can’t enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar can’t get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. So Which Type Is Worse? This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live – but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But don’t type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type Continue reading >>

Ask D:mine: And The 'worst' Type Of Diabetes Is...

Ask D:mine: And The 'worst' Type Of Diabetes Is...

Need help navigating life with diabetes? You can always Ask D'Mine! Welcome again to our weekly Q&A column, hosted by veteran type 1, diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil tackles that universal question of "who has it worse?" when it comes to diabetes. We never like to compare conditions, but this question does keep popping up, and as usual, Wil has done his homework. So, read on! Amy, type 1 from Wisconsin, asks: What are the findings on which 'brand' of diabetes -- type 1 or type 2 -- has more complications, or has serious complications more frequently? Is there any research out there that monitored complications for each type separately? I have looked and found nothing...but you are the master; if it is out there, I am sure you can get your hands on it! [email protected] D'Mine answers: You're right that good research is hard to come by on this subject, and passions about it run very high. Nothing seems to get type 1s and type 2s at each others' throats more quickly than the "who has it worse" question. Now, all other things being equal, sugar in the blood stream is equally toxic for T1s and T2s. We know it can trash your eyes, kidneys, nerve endings, and pretty much everything else in your body. And in either type 1 or type 2, if you can normalize your blood sugar, you are largely immune from these toxic effects (yes, I know that this is easier said than done). So, in theory, the two types of diabetes should be on equal footing. But they are not. More on that in a minute. But first I want to talk a bit more about who has it worse. Being type 1 myself, and working with a fair number of other type 1s, and a whole lot more type 2s for many years now, I think I'm qualified to state which is "worse." At the risk of being flamed alive—a common fate for columnis Continue reading >>

Doctors Baffled By

Doctors Baffled By "a1c Reversal"

(Washington, DC) Millions of Diabetics have found a simple way to reverse their Diabetes. Because of a scientific discovery in Asia, doctors have found out how to lower A1c and Blood Glucose levels without the need for expensive medications. Think Diabetes will last forever? Think again.After the Chief of The Vedda tribe, Lakmal, shared the knowledge of his people, Michael Dempsey was able to save his wife after she had fallen into a diabetic coma. Michael is now sharing the "secret" to getting rid of Diabetes for good, so that he can help people before they suffer from the same condition that almost took love of his life. This information is not to be taken lightly, as this life-changing program is designed to help anyone, regardless of how bad their Diabetes is. Michael reversed his wife's diabetes by doing this daily: After scientists from the world-renowned Pancreatic Research Facility in the U.K. discovered that the "Vedda Tribe" had no recorded cases of Diabetes ever, they knew they had to share these miraculous findings. This ground-breaking video has taken the Diabetic world by storm. [WatchVideo] Continue reading >>

Worst Case Scenario

Worst Case Scenario

“…y’all learn to take care of the things that are smaller and sweeter than you.” -Beasts Of The Southern Wild It was almost two years ago that my son nearly died at school. Not until now, Henry’s third year in a new school system, have I been able to put the story on paper. When Henry was entering into kindergarten we chose a very small private local school. It seemed ideal. Henry—who is funny, sweet and extremely bright—can be slow to commit but when he loves you, boy does he love you. With his new diagnosis he was brave, he was healthy and he was cooperative, but he was also really scared. If you’re bright like Henry, your mind is soaking up everything you read, everything people are saying, all at once. The thirst for knowing more is an intense drive…but couple that with a young and tender heart? It’s almost too much. The two things have trouble working together, and this is where the problem started. From the first day of school, the teachers seemed so positive and excited. Like we do with everyone, we told them about the worst case scenario—really low blood sugar. Henry would be able to check his levels on his own, but in the rare case that his blood sugar dropped really fast, he would need someone to help. We provided a low kit, gave instructions, wrote everything down on paper. We made little cards for quick reference. The teachers assured us that they were comfortable, that they could help. One afternoon at pick-up, while I was checking on his low supplies one of the teachers was talking to me. There were only three kids in the kindergarten class, Henry and the sons of the two teachers at the school. The two boys were cousins and had been raised almost like twins. The teachers said Henry was having trouble connecting with the boys. I asked Continue reading >>

The Worst Type – By Helen May

The Worst Type – By Helen May

I neither hide nor advertise that I have diabetes. As a result, it sometimes just pops into conversation. For example, I was recently explaining to my hairdresser that I wouldn’t be going to the gym that day because I was feeling less energetic than usual as a result of having a flu jab which I am entitled to it because I have diabetes. ASIDE: Don’t forget to get a flu jab. In my early diabetes years, I was not aware I was entitled to a free jab and, even minor flu made my diabetes difficult to manage. The only time I have experienced a significant reaction (although it was not major) was when I also had a pneumonia vaccination. And, as the flu strain varies each year, the vaccination is different. So, I would not make a judgement call based on my experience of a previous flu jab. My hairdresser was surprised to hear I have diabetes. This is a common reaction. Probably because I do not match the expected stereotype of someone with diabetes as I am very active. Another common reaction is a flow of questions: do you have to inject every day? how long have you had diabetes? which type do you have? is that the worst type? The last question is the one I find hardest to answer. Partially, because I cannot talk from personal experience and, partially, because I don’t think there is a worst type. My usual answer is to explain that, of the two main types of diabetes, Type 1 does not produce insulin and Type 2 do not use insulin efficiently. Then, I leave the questioner to decide. There are many ways to consider what makes one condition worse than another: the physical consequences, the treatment, the length of the condition and the mental impact. The physical consequences: higher risk of heart disease, kidney problems, neuropathy, retinopathy, to name a few: are risks for Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Fear Of Hypoglycaemia Means Nearly Half Risk High Blood Sugar Levels

Type 2 Diabetes: Fear Of Hypoglycaemia Means Nearly Half Risk High Blood Sugar Levels

Type 2 diabetes develops when the body can't produce enough insulin, or when the insulin that is produced doesn't work properly. The condition can be associated with poor diet and obesity. However, a study of the condition has revealed the fear and shame suffered by people with the condition is causing them to risk future life-threatening conditions. The UK has the worst type 2 diabetes blood glucose levels in Europe. A report by Sanofi found a quarter of people with T2 diabetes feel anxious or fearful about getting low blood sugar levels, commonly referred to as hypos. This research shows that people with T2 diabetes are making fear-driven decisions in the here and now to prevent low blood glucose levels, without considering that high blood glucose levels can have serious implications on their health in the future. Results revealed 42 per cent preferring to have high blood glucose levels instead of risking another hypo, despite this risking life threatening conditions in the future. Dr Max Pemberton, GP and Psychiatrist at St Anne’s Hospital, London said: “This research shows that people with type 2 diabetes are making fear-driven decisions in the here and now to prevent low blood glucose levels, without considering that high blood glucose levels can have serious implications on their health in the future as well. “They need more support in order to be successful at this blood sugar balancing act.” Sanofi has launched a campaign dedicated to helping patients called Highs and Lows: Better Balance for a Better Future, to help the 52 per cent of patients with type 2 diabetes who find it challenging to balance their blood glucose levels. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

First, the formal name for what we commonly call diabetes is diabetes mellitus, which translates from the Greek as making lots of urine with sugar in it or making lots of sweet urine. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus are diseases that have in common, sugar in the urine and the increased urination. When there are high amounts of sugar in the blood, the kidneys filter sugar into the urine. Sugar can be measured in the urine through a lab test commonly called a urinalysis. Urine dipsticks are also used to show sugar in the urine. Patients who develop diabetes mellitus most commonly have initial symptoms of increased thirst, increased urination and blurred vision due to high amounts of sugar in the fluids of the eye. Type 1 diabetes results from a rheumatoid-like autoimmune reaction in which one's own body attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that normally produce insulin. Type 1 is a disease in which the patient in a relatively short time has no insulin production. All patients with type 1 diabetes can also develop a serious metabolic disorder called ketoacidosis when their blood sugars are high and there is not enough insulin in their body. Ketoacidosis can be fatal unless treated as an emergency with hydration and insulin. Type 1 was once commonly called juvenile diabetes mellitus because it is most commonly diagnosed in children. It should be noted that even older adults in their 60s have occasionally been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes mellitus. One should think of it as a disease of high blood sugars due to a deficiency of insulin production. It must be treated by administration of insulin. Insulin is given at least twice a day and is often given four times a day in type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes rates are growing dramatically Continue reading >>

The Good, The Bad And The Worst Of Type 1 Diabetes

The Good, The Bad And The Worst Of Type 1 Diabetes

It is common in a diabetic’s life to face questions like “do you have the good type of diabetes or the bad one?” To be really honest, these are the types of questions that I really don’t know how to answer. What does “good” and “bad” diabetes even mean? Recently, I changed jobs in my office, so now I’m facing a lot of these types of questions again, and because of this, I thought that maybe it would be interesting to write a bit about the basic features of diabetes — the good, the bad and the worst. The Good Let’s start with the “goods” of diabetes. Because Diabetes is associated with the lack of capability of your body to naturally regulate the levels of glucose in your bloodstream, as a type 1 diabetic, you always have to help your body do that. In addition to self-injecting insulin, you can also do simple things like pay special attention to what you eat and how often you exercise. In this way, diabetes gives you an extra-healthy motivation to exercise every day and to eat healthier. This is clearly a good thing — you become more aware of your own fitness levels and more conscious about these kinds of topics. When my personal trainer discovered that I was diabetic, right away he understood why did I knew all the information about the “recommended amount of carbs” — the type of carbs and digestion times — that we had discussed during our first session. Review my blog posts on exercising and nutrition for more information on this. The Bad Looking at the bad things, the first that comes to my mind is definitely the danger that a diabetic faces every time we don’t eat enough, or when we inject too many units of insulin. All these situations can have repercussions in terms of losing consciousness and doing things that you end up not r Continue reading >>

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

The 11 Worst Foods For Diabetics

Diabetes, put simply, is the presence of too much glucose in your blood. Glucose is an important source of energy for cells and the brain’s main source of fuel, but too much of it can lead to major health problems. A hormone called insulin is responsible for allowing glucose into the cells, but with type 1 diabetes the immune system attacks the insulin; with type 2 diabetes the cells become resistant to insulin. In both cases, sugar is left to build up in the bloodstream. To control diabetes, it’s best to avoid foods that can raise your blood sugar too much or too fast. Obviously, foods that are high in sugar—both processed and natural—can cause blood sugar to spike, but plenty of foods that aren’t sweet, like those high in refined carbohydrates, can still have a high glycemic index and add too much sugar too quickly to your bloodstream (refined starches act a lot like sugar once they’re digested). The glycemic index is a measurement of how fast a carbohydrate raises your blood sugar; it’s suggested that when a diabetic eats one of the foods on our list (which have high glycemic indexes), it be balanced out with a low-glycemic index food, like steel-cut oatmeal or non-starchy vegetables. The Mayo Clinic suggests that diabetics center their diet on fruits, vegetables, and whole grains instead of simple carbs, animal products, and sweets. There’s no specific diabetes diet, but some foods should certainly be avoided, or at least consumed in strict moderation. Foods that are high in cholesterol, fat, sodium, carbohydrates, and calories are unhealthy in general, but are even more dangerous for diabetics because their health is already compromised, and their body is working overtime to keep them healthy. Each case of diabetes is unique, so diabetics should wor Continue reading >>

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman,… Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects just 5 percent of those adults, with type 2 diabetes affecting up to 95 percent. Here’s what else you need to know to be health-savvy in the age of the diabetes epidemic. What Causes Diabetes? "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease — the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin," a hormone, says Andjela Drincic, MD, associate professor of internal medicine in the division of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The exact cause is not known, but it's probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active. "The cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial," says Dr. Drincic. "People inherit genes that make them susceptible to type 2, but lifestyle factors, like obesity and inactivity, are also important. In type 2 diabetes, at least in the early stages, there is enough insulin, but the body becomes resistant to it." Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of the disease, a poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. African-Americans, Latin Americans, and certain Native American groups have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans. Juvenile or Adult-Onset: When Does Diabetes Start? Usually, type 1 diabetes in dia Continue reading >>

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