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What Is The Use Of Metformin Hydrochloride?

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet, Extended Release (500mg)

Metformin Hydrochloride: Oral Tablet, Extended Release (500mg)

What is this Medicine? METFORMIN (met FOR min) is used to treat type 2 diabetes. It helps to control blood sugar. Treatment is combined with diet and exercise. This medicine can be used alone or with other medicines for diabetes. Generic 94.28%Brand 5.72% *Brand contains same active ingredient but may not represent FDA-approved generic equivalent 750mg1000mg500mg Ingredients Close All Sections Reported Side Effects for Metformin Hydrochloride 500mg Extended-Release Tablet Close Elements of your daily lifestyle may have an effect on the medications you are taking. Drug interactions can result in unwanted side effects, reduce the effectiveness of your medicine or possibly increase the action of a particular medicine. Close All Interactions Close If you use tobacco or are trying to quit tobacco use, you may need to monitor your blood sugar more frequently. Nicotine, a component of tobacco, can increase the blood sugar. Also, if you are trying to quit smoking, as your body adjusts to not smoking, your blood sugar levels may change; the actions of Antidiabetic Agents (medicines used to treat diabetes) may be increased and this could lead to low blood sugar. Know the symptoms of low or high blood sugar and report them if they occur. Monitor your blood sugar regularly. Close Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in any trimester. Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adver Continue reading >>

Metformin: Uses, Action, Dosage, Side Effect And Brand Information

Metformin: Uses, Action, Dosage, Side Effect And Brand Information

What is metformin used for? Controlling blood sugar levels in adults, adolescents and children aged 10 years and over with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is used when diet alone has failed to fully control blood sugar. It may be used on its own, in combination with other oral antidiabetic medicines, or with insulin. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This is an off-licence use of metformin, so you won't find it mentioned in the information leaflets that come with the medicine. However, metformin is a widely used and established treatment option for this condition. How does metformin work? In type 2 diabetes the cells in the body, particularly muscle, fat and liver cells, become resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It makes cells in the body remove sugar from the blood. When the cells are resistant to insulin this makes blood sugar levels rise too high. Metformin hydrochloride is a type of antidiabetic medicine called a biguanide. It works in a number of ways to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Firstly, it increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. This enables these cells to remove sugar from the blood more effectively. Secondly, it reduces the amount of sugar produced by cells in the liver. Finally, it delays the absorption of sugar from the intestines into the bloodstream after eating so that there is less of a spike in blood sugar levels after meals. Metformin is taken regularly every day to help control blood sugar levels both between and directly after meals. In polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS many women have high insulin levels, and as a result their cells become resistant to the action of insulin. The high insulin levels also cause an Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin Hcl 500 Mg?

What Is Metformin Hcl 500 Mg?

Metformin hydrochloride, or HCL, is an oral medication available by prescription. The medication works along with a proper diet and exercise to lower blood glucose levels in diabetic patients and for other purposes determined by a physician. Due to possible complications and side effects, close monitoring of kidney function and blood sugar levels will help determine if the medication is safe for the individual. Video of the Day Patients use metformin HCL to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. This form of diabetes is non-insulin dependent and the body allows unused sugars to increase in the bloodstream. Metformin works to lower the blood sugar level, but does not affect the production of insulin. Women may also take the medication to treat polycystic ovary syndrome, as it helps stimulate the ovaries to release an egg. Metformin HCL is available in regular and extended-release oral tablets. Physicians prescribe regular 500 mg tablets for administration in divided doses throughout the day, while extended-release medication administration occurs with the evening meal each day, according to RxList.com. A physician may change the dosage amounts depending on blood sugar levels. A typical starting dosage of metformin is 500 mg twice daily, according to MayoClinic.com. To reduce the likelihood of side effects, metformin should be taken with meals. Swallowing the extended-release tablet whole, without crushing or chewing, is important for proper release of the medication in the body. Store the medication at room temperature and away from children. Metformin may cause unwanted side effects. Adverse reactions generally decrease with continued use of a medication. Individuals experiencing any side effects that are bothersome or increase in intensity need to contact a physician. Common Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride 500 Mg And 850 Mg Tablets

Metformin Hydrochloride 500 Mg And 850 Mg Tablets

What is in this leaflet? Please read this leaflet carefully before you start to take these tablets. Keep it until all the prescribed course of Metformin Hydrochloride tablets has been finished, as you may want to read it again. This leaflet may not contain all the information about this medicine that you would like to know. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, please talk to your doctor or pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Metformin Hydrochloride against the benefits expected for you. What is in your medicine? Metformin Hydrochloride 500 mg: Each film coated tablet contains 500 mg of the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride Metformin Hydrochloride 850 mg: Each film coated tablet contains 850 mg of the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride Other inactive ingredients. Sodium starch glycollate, Starch-Maize, povidone, Silica-colloidal anhydrous, magnesium stearate, hypromellose, titanium dioxide, propylene glycol, macrogol 6000 and purified talc. What is your medicine for? Metformin Hydrochloride is one of the medicines called oral hypoglycaemics, which work by reducing the level of sugar in the blood in people with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes Mellitus is a condition in which the blood glucose levels are not adequately controlled. There are two types of diabetes Type 1- Insulin dependent diabetes or juvenile onset diabetes, when insulin alone is not enough to control blood glucose levels. Type 2- Non insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) or maturity onset diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes are not able to make enough insulin or respond normally to the insulin their bodi Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Metformin Hydrochloride Tablets 500mg

Metformin Hydrochloride Tablets 500mg

PACKAGE LEAFLET: INFORMATION FOR THE PATIENT Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine because it contain Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours. If you get any side effects talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4. 1. What Metformin is and what it is used for 2. What you need to know before you take Metformin 6. Contents of the pack and other information 1 What Metformin is and what it is used for Metformin belongs to a group of medicines called biguanide antihyperglycaemic agents. It works by lowering your bloodsugar level. Metformin may be used alone or in combination with other medicines To treat noninsulin dependent diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes) where diet and exercise alone has failed to control blood sugar levels, particularly if overweight. As the only treatment or in combination with insulin, for children aged from 10 years and As an initial treatment to reduce complications associated with type 2 diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes), if you are an overweight adult and diet has failed to control your blood sugar Insulin-dependent diabetes, where the symptoms are poorly controlled. 2 What you need to know before you take Metformin You are allergic to Metformin or any of the other ingredients of this medicine (listed in section 6). You suffer from kidney or liver problems. You suffer from or have a history of serious diabetic complications such as loss of consciousness caused by either very high or very low blood sugar lev Continue reading >>

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin For Diabetes

Metformin for diabetes This leaflet is about the use of metformin for diabetes. This leaflet has been written specifically about the use of this medicine in children. Our information sometimes differs from that provided by the manufacturers, because their information is usually aimed at adult patients. Please read this leaflet carefully. Keep it somewhere safe so that you can read it again. If your child starts to breathe very fast and deeply and becomes dizzy, drowsy (sleepy) and confused, stop giving this medicine and take your child to hospital or call an ambulance straight away, as they may be suffering from a rare reaction to metformin called lactic acidosis. Name of drug Metformin hydrochloride Brand names: Glucophage®, Metsol® Why is it important for my child to take this medicine? Your child has been prescribed metformin because their diabetes is not fully controlled even when eating a strict diet. Metformin should help to control your child’s blood sugar levels, in combination with a controlled diet. What is metformin available as? Tablets: 500 mg, 850 mg Liquid medicine: 500 mg in 5 mL Oral powder: 500 mg per sachet, 1g per sachet; these contain aspartame When should I give metformin? Metformin is usually given once each day with or straight after a meal. This is usually in the morning. If your child needs a higher dose of metformin, they may need to take it two – three times each day, with or straight after a meal. Ideally these times are six hours apart. Give the medicine at about the same time each day so that this becomes part of your child’s daily routine, which will help you to remember. How much should I give? Your doctor will work out the amount of metformin (the dose) that is right for your child. The dose will be shown on the medicine label. Continue reading >>

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Generic Name: metformin (met FOR min) Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet What is metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Important information You should not use metformin if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to metformin: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking this medicine. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Common metformin side effects may include: low blood sugar; nausea, upset stomach; or diarrhea. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doc Continue reading >>

Dailymed - Metformin Hydrochloride- Metformin Hydrochloride Tablet

Dailymed - Metformin Hydrochloride- Metformin Hydrochloride Tablet

Metformin is an antihyperglycemic agent which improves glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes, lowering both basal and postprandial plasma glucose. Its pharmacologic mechanisms of action are different from other classes of oral antihyperglycemic agents. Metformin decreases hepatic glucose production, decreases intestinal absorption of glucose, and improves insulin sensitivity by increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization. Unlike sulfonylureas, metformin does not produce hypoglycemia in either patients with type 2 diabetes or normal subjects (except in special circumstances, see PRECAUTIONS ) and does not cause hyperinsulinemia. With metformin therapy, insulin secretion remains unchanged while fasting insulin levels and day-long plasma insulin response may actually decrease. The absolute bioavailability of a Metformin HCL 500 mg tablet given under fasting conditions is approximately 50 to 60%. Studies using single oral doses of Metformin HCL 500 mg to 1500 mg, and 850 mg to 2550 mg, indicate that there is a lack of dose proportionality with increasing doses, which is due to decreased absorption rather than an alteration in elimination. Food decreases the extent of and slightly delays the absorption of metformin, as shown by approximately a 40% lower mean peak plasma concentration (C max), a 25% lower area under the plasma concentration versus time curve (AUC), and a 35 minute prolongation of time to peak plasma concentration (T max) following administration of a single 850 mg tablet of metformin with food, compared to the same tablet strength administered fasting. The clinical relevance of these decreases is unknown. The apparent volume of distribution (V/F) of metformin following single oral doses of Metformin HCL 850 mg averaged 654 358 L. Metfor Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

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