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What Is The Scope Of Diabetes

Guasalud. Clinical Practice Guideline For Type 2 Diabetes. Full Version. Scope And Objectives.

Guasalud. Clinical Practice Guideline For Type 2 Diabetes. Full Version. Scope And Objectives.

The main aim of this Clinical Practice Guideline is to provide the sanitary professionals in charge of diabetic patient care with a tool which will allow them to make better decisions on the problems that the caring of this disease may involve. This Clinical Practice Guideline focuses on the patients care within the outpatient context and does not deal with gestational diabetes or the acute metabolic complications of the disease. As regards micro- and macroangiopathic complications, the Clinical Practice Guideline approaches its screening, prevention, diagnosis and partial aspects of the treatment. There are treatments for these complications which are dealt with at primary care and thus justify their approach in this guide. These are the treatments of microalbuminuria, some aspects of neuropathy and diabetic foot. During the editing process of this Clinical Practice Guideline, inhaled insulin was withdrawn from the market and for this reason this section has been removed. This guide is addressed to: diabetes educators, family physicians, primary care and specialised nursing professionals, endocrinologists and other professionals who attend these patients in outpatient visits (ophthalmologists, internists, cardiologists, nephrologists, chiropodists, general and vascular surgeons, etc.). In the Appences, both patients and relatives can find educational material about the disease. Continue reading >>

A Review Of Literature On Diabetes Self-management: Scope For Research And Practice In India Sridharan Sg, Chittem M, Muppavaram N - J Soc Health Diabetes

A Review Of Literature On Diabetes Self-management: Scope For Research And Practice In India Sridharan Sg, Chittem M, Muppavaram N - J Soc Health Diabetes

Diabetes self-management is a complex phenomenon which refers to patients'attending checkups regularly and adhering to a physician-prescribed regimen including following a strict diet, exercise, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG), and medication. This review will unpack the facilitators and barriers for each of the recommended lifestyle change for improving diabetes management (i.e. the behaviors of diet, exercise, SMBG, and medication). Referred to as the diabetes capital of the world, the review will focus on diabetes self-management research and interventions in India, highlighting the dearth for appropriate evidence-based programs in the country. Finally, the review will discuss the scope for future research and practice within this field in the Indian context. Keywords:Adherence, diabetes, India, psychosocial, self-management Sridharan SG, Chittem M, Muppavaram N. A review of literature on diabetes self-management: Scope for research and practice in India. J Soc Health Diabetes 2016;4:108-14 Sridharan SG, Chittem M, Muppavaram N. A review of literature on diabetes self-management: Scope for research and practice in India. J Soc Health Diabetes [serial online] 2016 [cited2018 Apr 8];4:108-14. Available from: Self-management is a concept emerging from Albert Bandura's social cognitive theory which is based on the principles of self-regulation, self-control, and self-efficacy. [1] , [2] Self-regulation refers to an individual's ability to monitor or manage oneself. [3] Self-regulation constitutes three components: (i) Self-observation: Monitoring ones' behavior, (ii) self-evaluation: Making judgments about ones' behavior in comparison with their own standards and their environmental conditions, and (iii) self-reaction: The emotional responses associated with the Continue reading >>

Gaples Institute For Integrative Cardiology

Gaples Institute For Integrative Cardiology

Gaples Institute for Integrative Cardiology A Nonprofit Advocating Natural Strategies Balanced with Conventional Medicine A friend of mine called in distress. He was just told by his primary care doctor that his blood sugar was close to the diabetic range. He was advisedto recheck his blood sugar check in 6 months, at which time it would be decided if diabetes medicine was needed. Sadly, that advice is given all too often-passive waiting until meds are needed. But fortunately, theres a highly potent lifestyle approach that drastically reduces the risk of diabetes. So powerful, its practically a diabetes vaccine. The scope is enormous: 38% of adults in the United States are prediabetic, defined as those with a blood sugar level that is above normal, but does not quite reach the threshold for the diagnosis of diabetes. Add that to 14% of the population who are already diabetic, and we have the sum total of just over 50% of the US who are either borderline or full blown diabetic. Sadly, many at risk for diabetes are not advised of the powerful lifestyle based treatment attheir disposal. And equally unfortunate, those already diagnosed with type II (adult onset) diabetes are often mistakenly toldthat it is a life long disease. Nothing could be further from the truth. And the stakes are high, as the worst complications of diabetes include premature heart disease, blindness and amputations. The key to understanding the potency of lifestyle for prevention of diabetes is a remarkable study, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). DPP studied more than 3,000 prediabetics who were randomly assigned to either no treatment, lifestyle changes, or metformin(a potent blood sugar medication). Compared to those who were left alone, the drug treated group had a 31% lower risk of developi Continue reading >>

Aims And Scope - Journal Of Diabetes And Metabolism

Aims And Scope - Journal Of Diabetes And Metabolism

Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism (JDM) is a broad-based journal found on two key tenets: To publish the most exciting researches on Diabetes & Metabolism: Second to provide a rapid turn-around time possible for reviewing and publishing of articles freely for research, teaching and reference purposes. It is basically aimed at Clinical, Medical/ health practitioners, students, professionals and researchers and professional bodies and institutions. All works published by OMICS Group are under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. This permits anyone to copy, distribute, transmit and adapt the work, provided the original work and source is appropriately cited. JDM strongly supports the Open Access initiative. All published articles will be assigned DOI provided by Cross Ref. JDM will keep up-to- date with the latest advancements in the field of Diabetes & Metabolism. Abstracts and full texts (HTML, PDF and XML format) of all articles published by JDM are freely available to everyone immediately after publication. JDM supports the Bethesda Statement on Open Access Publishing. Make the best use of Scientific Research and information from our 700 + peer reviewed, Open Access Journals Continue reading >>

The Scope Of Practice, Standards Of Practice, And Standards Of Professional Performance For Diabetes Educators

The Scope Of Practice, Standards Of Practice, And Standards Of Professional Performance For Diabetes Educators

Introduction The Scope of Practice, Standards of Practice, and Standards of Professional Performance for Diabetes Educators has been developed by the AADE to define the scope, role, and minimal level of quality performance of the diabetes educator; to differentiate diabetes education as a distinct healthcare specialty; to promote diabetes self-management education and training (DSME/T) as an integral part of diabetes care; and to facilitate excellence. Representing the expertise and experience of a multidisciplinary task force of health professionals representative of the AADE membership and an extensive review process embracing a broad spectrum of practice areas, this document supports the specialty by: • Stimulating the process of peer review, • Promoting documentation of the outcomes of DSME/T, • Encouraging research to validate practice and improve quality DSME/T and diabetes care, • Engaging in a process of critical examination of current diabetes educator practice and professional performance, and • Complementing other practice-related documents that address the delivery of DSME/T by diabetes educators and roles of other healthcare practitioners who are members of the diabetes care team. Diabetes education is unique in that its practitioners come from a variety of health disciplines. Diabetes educators remain individually accountable to the standards set by the discipline and by national, state, local, and institutional regulations that define and guide professional practice. This document serves to guide diabetes educators’ practice regardless of their professional discipline. Background Living well with diabetes requires active, diligent, effective self-management of the disease.1 Self- management is an important concept to e Continue reading >>

My Aade Network : Blogs : Diabetes Educators As Medicare Providers Of Dsme With A Scope Of Practice

My Aade Network : Blogs : Diabetes Educators As Medicare Providers Of Dsme With A Scope Of Practice

Diabetes Educators as Medicare Providers of DSME with a Scope of Practice Remember how excited we were with the Balanced Budget Act of 1997? Everyone who reached out to their legislators made a difference. We need you now. Go to the AADE Advocacy Center and ask your legislators to co-sponsor Senate 945 / HR Bill 1274, the Access to Quality Diabetes Education Act of 2013. The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 defined the criteria for Medicare reimbursement of Diabetes Self-Management Education / Training: A CMS recognized program via accreditation or recognition. The original bill included Certified Diabetes Educators recognition as Medicare providers. This provision fell out during the reconciliation between the House and the Senate. AADE has introduced legislation every congressional session to correct this oversight. The cost savings and complications reduction is well known by CMS. The missing critical piece is what is a diabetes educator? What criteria defines us? Please consider the following from the NCBDE website: To clarify the information on the website, holding the CDE credential does not confer any permission to manage diabetes beyond the limitations of the individuals professional practice. Let me try to connect the dots. As a pharmacist, nurse, dietitian, etc., you have skills. Some of your skills cross over into another professions area of expertise. Your registration or license allows your practice there within the scope of practice of your license. If you look at the AADE7, we are all expected to practice up to the AADE7 - the National DSME and Support Standards require these topics to be covered within a comprehensive DSME program. FACT: There is not a single healthcare discipline that includes comprehensive practice within the scope of the AADE7. The above Continue reading >>

The American Diabetes Association Disappointed In Scope Of New Screening Guidelines For Type 2 Diabetes And Pleased With Expansion Of Lifestyle Interventions

The American Diabetes Association Disappointed In Scope Of New Screening Guidelines For Type 2 Diabetes And Pleased With Expansion Of Lifestyle Interventions

The American Diabetes Association Disappointed in Scope of New Screening Guidelines for Type 2 Diabetes And Pleased with Expansion of Lifestyle Interventions The American Diabetes Association (Association) thanks the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) for releasing a final recommendation for Screening for Abnormal Blood Glucose and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus that improves upon the previous guidelines released in 2008. However, the Association is tremendously disappointed that the new USPSTF recommendation falls short of the well-established screening guidelines of diabetes experts around the world, including those of the Association. The final guidelines also fall short of the USPSTF's own draft recommendation, released in October of 2014. Under the draft guidelines, which the Association strongly supported, screening would reach all of those at high risk for diabetes providing the best approach to finding the 8.1 million Americans with undiagnosed diabetes and the approximately 76 million with undiagnosed prediabetes prior to the onset of devastating complications. In addition, this broader coverage is important because those included in the USPSTF recommendation will receive coverage for screening without cost-sharing through most health insurance plans, an important benefit which has been limited by the final recommendation. The Association appreciates that the recommendation to screen for abnormal blood glucose in overweight and obese individuals ages 40-70 will identify many more patients with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes than the prior USPSTF recommendation, which listed only hypertension as a risk factor. Additionally, we are very pleased that the USPSTF recommendation recognizes the importance of lifestyle interventions in the prevention and Continue reading >>

Health Scope - Relation Between The Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus And Human Development Index: A Global Ecological Study

Health Scope - Relation Between The Prevalence Of Diabetes Mellitus And Human Development Index: A Global Ecological Study

1 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, IR Iran 2 Kurdistan Research Center for Social Determinants of Health, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, IR Iran 3 Department of Operating Room, Rafsanjan University of Medical Sciences, Rafsanjan, IR Iran 4 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran * Corresponding author: Shahrzad Nematollahi, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran. Tel: +98-9136560762, E-mail: [email protected] Published Online: September 28, 2016 To Cite: Khazaei S, Rezaeian S, Khazaei S, Nematollahi S. Relation Between the Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus and Human Development Index: A Global Ecological Study, Health Scope. 2017 ;6(2):e40212. doi: 10.5812/jhealthscope.40212 . Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, but little is known about the effect of Human Development Index (HDI) on the prevalence rate of DM. Objectives: This study aimed to identify the variations in DM-specific rates by HDI among world countries. Methods: This global ecological study was performed based on the data from the international diabetes federation (IDFD) and the world bank report for the year 2013. The analysis for this study was performed on ecological data available for 161 countries in 2013. Results: Globally, the prevalence of DM ranged between 4% and12% in 2013, with the highest prevalence in Middle-East and Northern African (> 12%) and the lowest in Sub-Saharan countries (< 4%). The prevalence of DM was high in older age groups in both low-to Continue reading >>

174_diabetes Type 2: Module 02

174_diabetes Type 2: Module 02

Unfortunately, diabetes has become a common disease in the United States and worldwide. About 9% of Americans have DM, and 90% to 95% of them have type 2 diabetes (ADA, 2015). Americans living in poverty are more likely to have diabetes than middle-class and affluent Americans. Diabetes has also been correlated with obesity, creating a new term among healthcare professionals called diabesity. Alarmingly the trend is increasing each decade in our country, with a higher incidence of both diabetes and obesity that is projected to worsen. With current trends of obesity and metabolic syndrome, by the year 2030, 1 in every 3 people will develop diabetes mellitus (Wild et al., 2004). Percentage of U.S. Population with Diagnosed Diabetes, 19802014 As shown in the above graph, from 1980 through 2014 the percentage of the civilian, non-institutionalized population with diagnosed diabetes mellitus increased by: 200% (from 0.6% to 1.8%) for those aged 044 years 124% (from 5.5% to 12.3%) for those aged 4564 years 127% (9.1% to 20.7%) for those aged 6574 years 126% (8.9% to 20.1%) for those aged 75 years and older In general, the percentage of people with diagnosed diabetes has increased among all age groups. In 2014 the percentage of diagnosed diabetes among people aged 65 to 74 (20.7%) was more than 11 times that of people younger than age 45 (1.8%). It has been said 80% of people older than age 75 will eventually develop DM due to pancreatic fatigue and the prevalence of obesity. The number of Americans with diagnosed diabetes has more than tripled from 5.5 million in 1980 to 22 million (CDC, 2014). Looked at pragmatically, that becomes job security for you as a healthcare professional! Source: Advanced Adrenal Education, 2011. Diabetes is increasing dramatically throughout the w Continue reading >>

Scope Of The Diabetes Problem

Scope Of The Diabetes Problem

Type 2 diabetes differs from type 1 diabetes, previously called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), which usually manifests much earlier in life with a distinct pathogenetic profile. Until just before 2000, type 2 diabetes was regarded as a disease of middle-aged and elderly individuals (hence the name adult-onset diabetes). However, once teenagers began displaying clinical cases of type 2 diabetes, largely due to concurrent increases in childhood obesity and sedentary lifestyle, the terminology adult-onset was discarded, for it was no longer a disease confined to adults. Noting the escalating increases in sedentary living (Brownson, Boehmer & Luke, 2005), the 2004 International Diabetes Federation Consensus Workshop (Alberti et al., 2004) indicated that within 10 years, type 2 diabetes will be the predominant form of diabetes in many ethnic groups of children worldwide, surpassing type 1 diabetes in prevalence in children. The global figure of all people with diabetes, including adults, is skyrocketing. It is now 150 million and is predicted to rise to 300 million in 2025, with 75% of the cases occurring in developing countries (King, Aubet & Herman, 1998). According to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), type 2 diabetes directly contributes to the following conditions: Heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes have death rates due to heart disease that are 2 to 4 times greater than rates for adults without diabetes. The risk for stroke is 2 to 4 times higher among individuals with diabetes. High blood pressure. About 73% of adults with diabetes have blood pressures greater than 130/80 mmHg. Blindness. Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20 to 74. Kidney disease. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney failur Continue reading >>

What Are The Scope And Impact Of Diabetes?

What Are The Scope And Impact Of Diabetes?

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support. Diabetes is widely recognized as one of the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. In 2006, it was the seventh leading cause of death. However, diabetes is likely to be underreported as the underlying cause of death on death certificates. Diabetes is associated with long-term complications that affect almost every part of the body. The disease often leads to blindness, heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputations, and nerve damage. Uncontrolled diabetes can complicate pregnancy, and birth defects are more common in babies born to women with diabetes. Read the Original Article: Diabetes Overview Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or WebMD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service, or treatment. Do not consider WebMD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Scope Of Theproblem

Type 2 Diabetes: Scope Of Theproblem

Posted on November 30, 2012 | Comments Off on Type 2 Diabetes: Scope of theProblem Type 2 diabetes is the most important public health problem in the U.S. and most of the developed world. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicts that one of every three Americans born in the year 2000 will develop diabetes. The most common form of diabetes by far is type 2, which describes at least 85% of cases. Its less serious than type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetics have an immune system abnormality that destroys the pancreass ability to make insulin. Type 1s will not last long without insulin injections. On the other hand, many type 2 diabetics live well without insulin shots. The epidemic of diabetes in the U.S. and the developed world overwhelmingly involves type 2, not type 1. Prediabetes is what youd expect: a precursor that may become full-blown type 2 diabetes over time. Blood sugar levels are above average, but not yet into the diabetic range. One in four people with prediabetesdevelops type 2 diabetes over the course of three to five years. Researchers estimate that 35% of the adult U.S. population had prediabetesin 2008 . Thats one out of every three adults, or 79 million. Only 7% of them (less than one in 10) were aware they had it. In the U.S. as of 2010, 26 million folks have diabetes . That includes 11% of all adults. The rise of diabetes parallels the increase in overweight and obesity, which in turn mirrors the prominence of refined sugars and starches throughout our food supply. These trends are intimately related. Public health authorities 40 years ago convinced us to cut down our fat consumption in a mistaken effort to help our hearts. We replaced fats with body-fattening carbohydrates that test the limits of our pancreas to handle them. Diabetics Continue reading >>

Online Peer Health For Managing Diabetes

Online Peer Health For Managing Diabetes

Peer-based support groups have been successful for a multitude of conditions and afflictions. These communities provide support, advice, and experience to help with everything from addiction to chronic pain to managing diabetes. But could the same benefits be seen on the web? Michelle Litchman , a diabetes researcher, looks into the potential health benefits of social media-based peer health groups. She shares their initial findings and what this research could mean for health care. Health tips, medical news, research, and more for a happier, healthier life. From University of Utah Health Sciences, this is The Scope. Diabetes is one of the biggest health epidemics facing us today and managing the disease is important not only for the well-being of those that have it, but also as a way to control healthcare spending since people that don't manage the disease tend to develop more serious chronic complications. Michelle Litchman is a researcher and diabetes nurse practitioner who is going to study improving Type I diabetes outcomes with an online peer health intervention. And we're going to break this down a little bit and talk about what exactly that means and what it could mean for managing diabetes. So, first of all, tell me about peer health. What does that mean? Peer health is the interaction, education, and support offered by peers who have the same medical condition to promote health-enhancing change. So, essentially, what that means is when you are trying to find someone else who maybe understands the same things that you are going through, so in Type I diabetes specifically, it makes up only 5% to 10% of the entire diabetes population. So it's kind of an outlier. And because of that, people can sometimes feel isolated, or they're not able to relate to others in t Continue reading >>

Aims And Scope - Diabetes Research And Therapy | Open Access Journals

Aims And Scope - Diabetes Research And Therapy | Open Access Journals

The Editors will concentrate on studies that involve wisely selected reports that provide a link between basic research and translation to diabetes-related diseases. Also, intends to promote better management of functional decline during glucose homeostasis-metabolic impairment and improved prevention or treatment of the disease. The editors support the diffusion of distinctive solutions to challenging scientific and translational questions related with studies of Diabetes and metabolically/genetically related disorders. JDRT dedicates to publishing material of research in Diabetes-prevention oriented approach, delaying the onset of causative lifestyle and nutrition deterioration. Most likely those studies would be focused on indicators of disease risk and mechanisms of glucose metabolic dysregulation related diseases. Such articles will be appealing to an international audience of researchers in Diabetes, Nutritionists, Health Science researchers, diabetes educators, health care professionals and clinical specialists. Most likely, the readership of JDRT will be involved in the practice of clinical disease management and metabolic health promotion. The Editors pursue studies which prioritise merit, originality, reduction to practice, clinical worth, focus and appeal to the readership. Presumably, scientists in all disciplines related to Diabetes and various scientists devoted to Glucose Metabolic Homeostasisand related subjects will engage as authors of JDRT articles. JDRT employs a rigorous peer-review and editing process to evaluate manuscripts for scientific sharpness, innovation, and significance. Editors will weight as well the Diabetes Science worth of its diverse content. JDRT publishes articles of original, interdisciplinary, and applied research. The Editor ac Continue reading >>

Health Scope - Health-promoting Lifestyle In Patients With And Without Diabetes In Iran

Health Scope - Health-promoting Lifestyle In Patients With And Without Diabetes In Iran

Health-Promoting Lifestyle in Patients with and without Diabetes in Iran 1 Internist and Gastroenterologist, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran 2 Center for Health Related social and Behavioral Sciences Research, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran 3 Analytical Chemistry, Shahroud, IR Iran 4 Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, IR Iran 5 Management Specialist Assistant Professor in Deputy of Current Affairs (Moh & Me) Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, IR Iran 6 Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran 7 Department of Infection Disease, Imam Hossein Hospital, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran 8 Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran * Corresponding author: Mohammad Amiri, Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, IR Iran. Tel: +98-2332374350, Fax: +98-2332335588, E-mail: [email protected] Published Online: September 24, 2016 To Cite: Vahedi H, Khosravi A, Sadeghi Z, Aliyari R, Shabankhamseh A, et al. Health-Promoting Lifestyle in Patients with and without Diabetes in Iran, Health Scope. 2017 ;6(2):e39428. doi: 10.5812/jhealthscope.39428 . Background: Diabetes is among the prevalent chronic non-communicable diseases, which in recent decades has dragged much attentions toward improving care of patients in Iran. Objectives: The current study aimed to compare the health-promoting lifestyle of patients with and without diabetes. Methods: In the current study, 150 patients with diabetes and 150 patients without diabetes referred to the Imam Hossein sub Continue reading >>

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