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What Is The Root Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes Treatment News: Method To Prevent Root Cause Of Type 2 Discovered By Scientists

Diabetes Treatment News: Method To Prevent Root Cause Of Type 2 Discovered By Scientists

Diabetes affects one in 16 people in the UK, and type 2 is the most common form. A root cause of type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance. This is where cells stop responding to directions from the hormone, insulin, that regulates glucose - or sugar - storage. In healthy people, cells will grab glucose out of the bloodstream to use for energy. Researchers may have discovered an effective way to restore insulin sensitivity so that diabetes could be prevented or treated. But if this doesn't happen, sugar levels can rise too high in the bloodstream, triggering symptoms such as excessive thirst, fatigue and weight loss. However, a new study may have discovered an effective way to restore insulin sensitivity so that diabetes could be prevented or treated. Researchers at Columbia University have created a drug to improve insulin sensitivity that doesn't come with adverse effects. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. This is because there are already insulin-sensitising drugs on the market, but they can cause their own issues. It is hoped the new drug will be able to lower to blood sugar safely. "Researchers have been looking for ways to overcome insulin resistance without inadvertently triggering fat accumulation," said Domenico Accili, lead study author from the University of Columbia. "But previous efforts have been unsuccessful." In the new study, researchers inhibited a particular protein in mice that saw glucose levels decline but left lipid levels unaffected. "This suggested that if we could find molecules that act on the glucose-production arm of FOXO1 while leaving SIN3A alone, we could improve insulin sen Continue reading >>

Towards A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes

Towards A Cure For Type 2 Diabetes

Over 50% of American adults are estimated to have prediabetes or diabetes. The twin cycles (hepatic and pancreatic) are not simply rare metabolic mistakes leading to disease. These responses are almost universal because they serve as protective mechanisms. Protective? I can almost hear you gasp. Insulin resistance and beta cell dysfunction are protective? Yes. Absolutely. What do they protect us from? The very name gives us the vital clue. Insulin resistance protects the liver from too much insulin. Our body is resisting the excessive insulin, which is harmful. Imagine the liver as a balloon that can be filled with sugar and fat, the two storage forms of food energy. Normally when we eat, insulin goes up, storing some of this food energy. When we stop eating, during fasting, insulin levels fall, releasing some of the stored energy for the rest of the body. When insulin levels stay elevated for a prolonged period, the liver fills up with sugar and fat, like an over-inflated balloon. The pressure inside the liver goes up and up, making it increasingly difficult to move sugar into this overfilled liver. This is insulin resistance. The liver simply cannot store any, so rejects the incoming sugars, becoming resistant to insulin’s normal signal. Glucose piles up outside the cell in the blood. This provokes a compensatory hyperinsulinemia. Like trying to inflate the over-inflated balloon, it works for a time. However, it becomes more and more difficult. Ultimately, the liver was only trying to protect itself from the damaging effects of the high insulin. The problem is not the insulin resistance, but original hyperinsulinemia. The liver is busy trying to clear the fatty congestion by exporting this new fat. Some of it accumulates in the pancreas, eventually clogging it and l Continue reading >>

The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes

The Cure For Type Ii Diabetes

If you are already on insulin, absolutely do not stop taking insulin, and do not stop measuring your glucose levels, without your doctor's permission. Surprisingly, medical researchers, such as from Medical News Today, consider Type 2 diabetes to be an immune problem whereby the immune system attacks the body's own cells. Type 2 diabetes is in the process of being redefined as an autoimmune disease rather than just a metabolic disorder, said an author of a new study published in Nature Medicine this week, the findings of which may lead to new diabetes treatments that target the immune system instead of trying to control blood sugar. … The researchers believe that insulin resistance, the hallmark of type 2 diabetes (unlike type 1 diabetes where it is the insulin-producing cells that are destroyed), is the result of B cells and other immune cells attacking the body's own tissues. This discovery is nothing new to some natural medicine researchers. Treatments that do the things necessary to build the immune system have been curing type 2 diabetes for years. Some of these treatments are “electromedicine” treatments which use gentle electrical waves to do the things necessary to rebuild the immune system. But these gentle electrical waves do not directly build the immune system, rather they remove the “root cause” of why the immune system is dysfunctional in the first place. Think of the school bully. Instead of fixing the students he beats up every week, the school might just kick the bully out of school. By doing this the school is not dealing with the “symptoms” of the bully (i.e. the injured students) they are dealing with the “root cause” of the injuries (i.e. the bully). So what is the “root cause” of why the immune system is weak? To understand th Continue reading >>

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2) (cont.)

Diabetes (mellitus, Type 1 And Type 2) (cont.)

A A A If a person has diabetes and experiences any of the following, call a health-care professional: Experiencing diabetes symptoms, since this may mean that the person's blood sugar level is not being controlled despite treatment. When tested, blood sugar levels are consistently high (more than 200 mg/dL). Persistently high blood sugar levels are the root cause of all of the complications of diabetes. The patient's blood sugar level is often low (less than 70 mg/dL), called hypoglycemia. This may mean that the diabetes management strategy is too aggressive. It also may be a sign of infection or other stress on the body's organs, such as kidney failure, liver failure, adrenal gland failure, or the concomitant use of certain medications. An injury to the foot or leg, no matter how minor: Even the tiniest cut or blister can become very serious in a person with diabetes. Early diagnosis and treatment of problems with the feet and lower extremities, along with regular diabetic foot care, are critical in preserving the function of the legs and preventing amputation. Low-grade fever (less than 101.5 F or 38.6 C): Fever is one sign of infection. Many common infections can potentially be more dangerous for diabetic patients than for other people. Note any symptoms that may indicate where the infection is located, such as painful urination, redness or swelling of the skin, abdominal pain, chest pain, or cough. Nausea or vomiting but can keep liquids down.: The health-care professional may adjust medications while the patient is sick. The health-care professional will probably recommend an urgent office visit or a visit to the emergency department. Persistent nausea and vomiting can be a sign of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a potentially life-threatening condition, as well as se Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal

Type 2 Diabetes Reversal

Introduction In the United States, nearly 80 million people, or one in four has some form of diabetes or pre-diabetes. What’s worse, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes among children and teens has also skyrocketed. Between 90 and 95 percent have noninsulin-dependent or type II diabetes. Formerly called adult-onset, this form of diabetes usually begins in adults over age 40, and is most common after age 55. Nearly half of people with diabetes don’t know it because the symptoms often develop gradually and are hard to identify at first. The person may feel tired or ill without knowing why. Diabetes can cause problems that damage the heart, blood vessels, eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Recent data, reveals that, between 2007 and 2015, incidence of type 1 diabetes among children under the age of 19 rose by 21 percent. Incidence of type 2 diabetes among children aged 10-19 rose by 30 percent during that same timeframe! Conventional Medicine Has It All Wrong. Statistics such as these points to two very important facts. First, it tells us that diabetes cannot be primarily caused by genetics, and secondly, it literally screams that something we’re doing, consistently and en masse, is horribly wrong, and we need to address it. Conventional medicine has type 2 diabetes pegged as a problem with blood sugar rather than the underlying problem of improper insulin receptor function and the role of inflammation. The reality is that diabetes is a disease rooted in insulin receptor dysfunction and more importantly, a malfunction of inflammatory signaling. This is why the medical community’s approach to its treatment is not getting anywhere. Treating type 2 diabetes with insulin is actually one of the worst things you can do. Recent research has come to the conclusion that treating type 2 Continue reading >>

Attacking Type 2 Diabetes From A New Direction With Encouraging Results

Attacking Type 2 Diabetes From A New Direction With Encouraging Results

A Rutgers researcher is developing a drug aimed at treating the root cause and reversing the disease Type 2 diabetes affects an estimated 28 million Americans according to the American Diabetes Association, but medications now available only treat symptoms, not the root cause of the disease. New research from Rutgers shows promising evidence that a modified form of a different drug, niclosamide - now used to eliminate intestinal parasites - may hold the key to battling the disease at its source. The study, led by Victor Shengkan Jin, an associate professor of pharmacology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, has been published online by the journal Nature Medicine. Jin says it is important to find a suitable medication to correct the cause of the disease as quickly as possible because the only way now known to "cure" the disease involves major gastric bypass surgery. "The surgery can only be performed on highly obese people," Jin explains, "and carries significant risks that include death, so it is not a realistic solution for most patients." And the number of patients continues to rise. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention projects that 40 percent of all Americans now alive will develop type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is the form of diabetes once known as "adult onset," in which the body produces insulin that ordinarily would keep blood sugar under control, but either it does not produce enough insulin or the body's ability to use that insulin is degraded. According to Jin, a major cause of insulin resistance is the accumulation of excess fat in the cells of the liver, as well as in muscle tissue. The fat disrupts the process where, ordinarily, insulin would cause body tissues to correctly absorb glucose - blood sugar - and use it as a fuel. With nowhere el Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance – A Root Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Resistance – A Root Cause Of Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin resistance creates increased levels of insulin and glucose in the blood stream, which is a major underlying cause of diabetes. Combating this condition is crucial for heart disease prevention because diabetes can damage the cardiovascular system, specifically the lining of the arteries, as well as creating a greater risk of blood clot formation. The kidneys' ability to remove salt is also affected. All of these factors raise the likelihood of developing Cardiovascular Disease leading to a heart attack or stroke. Insulin resistance-related type 2 diabetes also increases the risk of Metabolic Syndrome (Syndrome X), a cluster of increased risks for cardiovascular disease. Research by Louisiana State University published in the Journal of the American Medical Association in December 2003 found that those suffering from Metabolic Syndrome were at significantly greater risk of dying from a heart attack than those without the condition. The study, conducted over a 15-year period, concluded that men with Metabolic Syndrome were from 2.9 to 4.2 times more likely to die of a heart attack. This breakthrough in understanding the body's biochemistry remains relatively unknown among the general public, even though insulin resistance has reached epidemic proportions. Your doctor may not have explained the crucial link between insulin resistance, diabetes and metabolic syndrome. You need to understand this link in order to better manage your diabetes and reduce the risk of the onset of other serious conditions. The Insulite Diabetes Advanced Management System is a scientific breakthrough that could improve your health by reversing the symptoms of insulin resistance through increasing the insulin sensitivity of the walls of your cells. Greater sensitivity can result in a huge im Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

The pancreas lies at the back of the abdomen behind the stomach and has two main functions: to produce juices that flow into the digestive system to help us digest food to produce the hormone called insulin. Insulin is the key hormone that controls the flow of glucose (sugar) in and out of the cells of the body. Type 2 diabetes is caused by: insufficient production of insulin in the pancreas a resistance to the action of insulin in the body's cells – especially in muscle, fat and liver cells. Type 2 diabetes is strongly associated with being overweight, but it's less clear what causes it, compared to the Type 1 disease. Term watch Type 2 diabetes used to be called 'non-insulin dependent diabetes'. This is because insulin injections were not part of its treatment. As some people with Type 2 also now require insulin, the term Type 2 is preferred. In the first few years after diagnosis with Type 2 diabetes high levels of insulin circulate in the blood because the pancreas can still produce the hormone. Eventually insulin production dwindles. For reasons we don't understand, the effect of insulin is also impaired. This means it doesn't have its normal effect on the cells of the body. This is called insulin resistance. What is insulin resistance? Insulin resistance has a number of knock-on effects: it causes high blood glucose it disturbs the fat levels in the blood, making the arteries of the heart more likely to clog (coronary heart disease) The insulin-producing cells of the pancreas in people with Type 2 diabetes don't seem to come under attack from the immune system as they do in Type 1. But they are still unable to cope with the need to produce a surge of insulin after a meal. Normally, this insulin surge causes the body to store excess glucose coming in and so keeps Continue reading >>

Scientists Uncover Root Cause Of Diabetes

Scientists Uncover Root Cause Of Diabetes

Both major forms of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2, are caused by the same underlying biological mechanism, scientists have discovered. The finding, reported in the FASEB Journal published by the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, provides strong evidence that diabetes results from the formation of toxic clumps of a hormone called amylin. The work by scientists at the Universities of Manchester and Auckland could open the door to new treatments for the metabolic disorder. Lead researcher Garth Cooper, from the University of Auckland, said the discovery is based on 20 years’ work in New Zealand and that it indicates both types of diabetes could both be slowed down or even reversed by new medicines that stop amylin forming these toxic clumps. Special: The Top 4 Signs That You’re Already Prediabetic In addition to producing insulin, cells in the pancreas also produce amylin. Both hormones normally work together to regulate the body’s response to food intake. But if they are no longer produced, then levels of sugar in the blood rise, resulting in diabetes and causing damage to organs such as the heart, kidneys, eyes, and nerves if blood sugar levels aren’t properly controlled. But the new research shows some of the amylin can accumulate in the pancreas as toxic clumps, which then, in turn, destroy those cells that produce insulin and amylin. That, in turn, leads to diabetes. Cooper’s research team now hopes to develop experimental medicines that could be ready to go into clinical trials in the next two years involving diabetic patients in England and Scotland. © 2017 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Diet

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment & Diet

A tough life-long disease, Diabetes is something that affects the body’s functioning. It affects body’s glucose and blood sugar levels. Although diabetes has different types, the primarily seen ones are Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational. We here would be looking into the Type 2 Diabetes in brief and shall seek answers for the same. Join in as we dig deep into ‘Type 2 Diabetes and its Causes, Symptoms, Treatment and Diet’. Let’s start off then. What is Type 2 Diabetes? On a general note, our body’s pancreas is stimulated to produce insulin for the body. The insulin helps change the glucose obtained from the food into energy for the body. However, in the Type 2 Diabetes, the pancreas still produces the insulin but the body doesn’t use it as required upon. Also known by as insulin resistance, Type 2 diabetes is seen commonly among the diabetic patients, the stats revealing at 85% of all diabetic patients. The Root Cause of Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes is caused as a result of combination of different things like DNA, obesity, metabolic syndrome, broken beta cells and more. More so over, childhood obesity is one of the grave reasons for diabetes later in the adult age. The disease is also seen in people with high blood pressure, high level of cholesterol, extra fat layers around the body and waist. For many, the high glucose production from liver also affects the way diabetes is contracted upon. The Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes There are different risk factors associated with Type 2 Diabetes. A few major things that affect highly in Type 2 Diabetes are- Gene Factors If the person is above 45 years of age. If a parent, brother or sister has been suffering from Diabetes. Medical and Health Factors Prediabetes High Blood Pressure Low levels of good Cholestero Continue reading >>

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

Case Study: Reversing 11 Years Of Pain And Frustration With Type 2 Diabetes In Less Than 6 Months

I’d like to take a moment to recognize the incredible 6-month transformation of Cynthia Bronte, one of my clients working diligently at reversing insulin resistance. This is another story that reflects the amazing mental, physical and emotional transformation that can occur with a strategic approach to plant-focused high-carbohydrate nutrition. Diagnosis with Type 2 Diabetes Cynthia was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2003, in the midst of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), an acute life-threatening condition that typically marks the onset of type 1 diabetes. Cynthia’s symptoms of DKA were unmistakable, and included urinating more than 14 times per day, insatiable thirst and low energy. Cynthia was unaware that her fasting blood sugar was 5 times higher than normal, at 550 mg/dL (normal blood sugars range from 70 – 130 mg/dL). Treatment Protocol When Cynthia was first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, she was instructed to consume a low carbohydrate diet in order to minimize blood sugar. She was instructed to eat foods that were high in protein and fat, while limiting her intake of fruits, artificial sweeteners, grains, pastas, rice, bread and cereal. As we’ve talked about in a previous article, she was initially instructed to minimize her intake of carbohydrates to minimize the amount of glucose that would eventually appear in her blood. Her diet plan followed what I refer to as “the linear diabetes nutrition model,” shown below. The problem with the linear model is that it does not address the underlying root cause of type 2 diabetes – insulin resistance. By eating a low carbohydrate diet, Cynthia was eating mainly fat and protein, resulting in increased lipid deposits in her liver and muscle tissue. In turn, increased fat storage in her liver and muscle resul Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 Diabetes Causes

Type 2 diabetes has several causes: genetics and lifestyle are the most important ones. A combination of these factors can cause insulin resistance, when your body doesn’t use insulin as well as it should. Insulin resistance is the most common cause of type 2 diabetes. Genetics Play a Role in Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes can be hereditary. That doesn’t mean that if your mother or father has (or had) type 2 diabetes, you’re guaranteed to develop it; instead, it means that you have a greater chance of developing type 2. Researchers know that you can inherit a risk for type 2 diabetes, but it’s difficult to pinpoint which genes carry the risk. The medical community is hard at work trying to figure out the certain genetic mutations that lead to a risk of type 2. Lifestyle Is Very Important, Too Genes do play a role in type 2 diabetes, but lifestyle choices are also important. You can, for example, have a genetic mutation that may make you susceptible to type 2, but if you take good care of your body, you may not develop diabetes. Say that two people have the same genetic mutation. One of them eats well, watches their cholesterol, and stays physically fit, and the other is overweight (BMI greater than 25) and inactive. The person who is overweight and inactive is much more likely to develop type 2 diabetes because certain lifestyle choices greatly influence how well your body uses insulin. Lack of exercise: Physical activity has many benefits—one of them being that it can help you avoid type 2 diabetes, if you’re susceptible. Unhealthy meal planning choices: A meal plan filled with high-fat foods and lacking in fiber (which you can get from grains, vegetables, and fruits) increases the likelihood of type 2. Overweight/Obesity: Lack of exercise and unhealthy me Continue reading >>

Defective, Infectious Proteins Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

Defective, Infectious Proteins Linked To Type 2 Diabetes

More than one in ten people in the US have type 2 diabetes — that's over 29 million people. It's characterized by excessive sugar (glucose) in the blood due to the development of resistance to insulin, the hormone that normally metabolizes glucose. Deposits of folded and clumped proteins in the pancreas are also common in type 2 diabetes. There, they may impact the ability of the pancreas to function properly. But, researchers from McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center have discovered that they could play a role in causing the disease. The configuration of protein, including how it's folded, is one factor that contributes to its ability to function properly. The scientists found the abnormally folded protein that accumulates in diabetes can induce the symptoms of the disease. What's more, the protein is similar to an infectious protein found in diseases like Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Kuru, and Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (mad cow disease). Don't Miss: New Study Unveils the True Story of Kuru, a Fatal Brain Disease Spread by the Cultural Practice of Eating the Dead Study researcher Claudio Soto and colleagues published their findings on August 1, in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include frequent infections, hunger, fatigue, increased thirst and urination, and blurry vision, but some people have no symptoms for the first several years they have the disease. Lab tests to measure blood glucose, or A1C, a test that measures the glucose average over the last three months, can confirm the diagnosis. Potential complications of diabetes include heart disease and stroke (from clogged blood vessels/atherosclerosis), nerve damage (which includes pain, numbness, potential unnoticed injury Continue reading >>

How To Treat The Root Cause Of Diabetes

How To Treat The Root Cause Of Diabetes

After about age 20, we may have all the insulin-producing beta cells we’re ever going to get. So, if we lose them, we may lose them for good. Autopsy studies show that by the time type 2 diabetes is diagnosed, we may have already killed off half of our beta cells. You can kill pancreatic cells right in a petri dish. If you expose the insulin-producing beta cells in our pancreas to fat, they suck it up and then start dying off. Fat breakdown products can interfere with the function of these cells and ultimately lead to their death. A chronic increase in blood fat levels can be harmful to our pancreas. It’s not just any fat; it’s saturated fat. As you can see in my video, What Causes Diabetes?, predominant fat in olives, nuts, and avocados gives a tiny bump in death protein 5, but saturated fat really elevates this contributor to beta cell death. Therefore, saturated fats are harmful to beta cells. Cholesterol is, too. The uptake of bad cholesterol (LDL) can cause beta cell death as a result of free radical formation. Diets rich in saturated fats not only cause obesity and insulin resistance, but the increased levels of circulating free fats in the blood (non-esterified fatty acids, or NEFAs) may also cause beta cell death and may thus contribute to the progressive beta cell loss we see in type 2 diabetes. These findings aren’t just based on test tube studies. When researchers have infused fat directly into people’s bloodstreams, they can show it directly impairing pancreatic beta cell function. The same occurs when we ingest it. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by “defects in both insulin secretion and insulin action,” and saturated fat appears to impair both. Researchers showed saturated fat ingestion reduces insulin sensitivity within hours. The subjects Continue reading >>

Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes

Causes Of Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a number of diseases that involve problems with the hormone insulin. While not everyone with type 2 diabetes is overweight, obesity and lack of physical activity are two of the most common causes of this form of diabetes. It is also responsible for about 90% to 95% of diabetes cases in the United States, according to the CDC. This article will give you a better understanding of the causes of type 2 diabetes, what happens in the body when type 2 diabetes occurs, and specific health problems that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Each section links to more in-depth information on that topic. In a healthy person, the pancreas (an organ behind the stomach) releases insulin to help the body store and use the sugar from the food you eat. Diabetes happens when one or more of the following occurs: When the pancreas does not produce any insulin. When the pancreas produces very little insulin. When the body does not respond appropriately to insulin, a condition called "insulin resistance." Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin; however, the insulin their pancreas secretes is either not enough or the body is unable to recognize the insulin and use it properly (insulin resistance). When there isn't enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose (sugar) can't get into the body's cells and builds up in the bloodstream instead. When glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into cells, it causes damage in multiple areas of the body. Also, since cells aren't getting the glucose they need, they can't function properly. To understand why insulin is important, it helps to know more about how the body uses food for energy. Your body is made up of millions of cells. To make energy, these cells need food in a Continue reading >>

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