diabetestalk.net

What Is The Purpose Of The Glucose Test Strips?

Blood Glucose Test Strips

Blood Glucose Test Strips

Another Shared Diabetic Supply Harboring Bacterial Contamination Author: Sharon Geaghan, MD // Date: JAN.1.2018 // Source: Clinical Laboratory News When you or a family member are admitted to the hospital, you expect that the room will be cleaned and disinfected thoroughly. You do not expect to find half-used tissue paper boxes or leftover bandages from the previous patient. To the contrary, patients expect that hospitals will take all necessary precautions to avoid spreading disease, including disposing of patients medications when they are discharged from a facility. Perhaps the only exception to the current practice of single-use, single-patient hospital supplies is blood glucose test strips. Hospitals and other institutions often procure blood glucose test strips in 25- or 50-count vials and bring them from patient to patient and room to room for testing purposes. Testing sites range from acute care hospitals, outpatient clinics, skilled nursing facilities and long term care facilities to prisons, shelters, surgery centers, schools, and camps. Regardless of testing site, this practice of multi-strip vial use has come into focus as yet another potential source of contamination for patients undergoing blood glucose testing, along with the well-documented risks of sharing blood glucose meters and capillary puncture devices (1). CDC and FDA Guidance on Shared Diabetic Supplies The position of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on shared diabetic supplies is clear: Unused supplies such as blood glucose test strips taken to a patients bedside should not be used for another patient because of possible inadvertent contamination (2). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates these test strips as medical devices. In the home testing market, FDA advises con Continue reading >>

How To Use Glucose Test Strips

How To Use Glucose Test Strips

Individuals with diabetes know how important management and control are. You cannot let diabetes get the best of you. While proper diet and healthy lifestyle choices are part of that, you must make sure that you have the proper equipment. For diabetics, that equipment is the blood test monitor, the lance, and, of course, the blood glucose test strips. Typically, testing devices will come with everything that you need, but they will only last so long. If you want to make sure that you have everything, you need to make regular purchases and stay stocked on equipment. Diabetic test strips, lancets, and other vital pieces of diabetes testing must remain in stock so that you can perform regular testing. If you have never used a blood sugar test strip before or if you are using a new brand, you might want to know more about using them. As with anything, you cannot jump right into this blindly. It is especially important here because your health is at stake. If you do not do this properly, you may not get accurate results. Inaccurate results can put your health at risk, causing hospitalization or even death. You must make sure that you understand the use of your chosen test strips completely. Make understanding the diabetic test strips a top priority when you first start and any time you switch. Luckily, nearly every blood sugar test strip works in essentially the same way. While you might see some differences, there are few of them. This is because universal use of these important items and devices is critical for the health and safety of individuals. Begin by making sure that your chosen strip is compatible with your device. Compatibility is key to using the blood sugar test strip with the device, obviously, so you want to choose one that is fully compatible. You can find li Continue reading >>

Glucose Testing

Glucose Testing

Glucose Testing Glucose Testing is a important and vital part of a diabetics daily health care. Without testing, a diabetic can become sick because their glucose levels are not where they need to be. Glucose testing is done by using a glucose testing meter, which uses a glucose testing strip. Glucose Testing Meter Steps for Testing Glucose To test for glucose one must drop a sample of blood by placing on the strip. This is done by poking the skin with a needle called a lancet. The lancet pricks the finger which allows the sample of blood to flow right onto the glucose strip. Once the blood sample has made it on to the glucose strip, a device called a glucose meter is used to measure the glucose in the blood. In each test strip, there is a chemical called glucose oxidase. This glucose oxidase reacts with the glucose in the blood sample and is created into a acid called gluconic acid. This current is then able to read and determine how much glucose is in the sample of blood on the testing strip. The number is then relayed on the screen of the glucose testing meter. Blood Glucose Meters A glucose meter is used to determine the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. The glucose meter is a key element in monitoring diabetes can help test if the blood sugar is too high or low. Glucose meters are small and are handheld, they can fit in the palm of a hand. Glucose meters cost anywhere from $20 to the most advanced meters costing $500. Examples One Touch Verio Glucose Meter System The One Touch Verio glucose meter is practical, reliable, and affordable. This glucose meter provides instant notifications of high and low blood sugar trends, unsurpassed accuracy, and requires a very small blood sample size. The Verio glucose meter is one of the more recent and efficient Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Test Strips: Options To Reduce Usage

Blood Glucose Test Strips: Options To Reduce Usage

Go to: Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that, despite widespread use, self-monitoring of blood glucose levels has little clinical benefit in many patients with diabetes. The impact of more focused public-payer policies for the use of blood glucose test strips may be substantial. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of annual prescription claims for test strips between 1997 and 2008 for patients in Ontario aged 65 and older with diabetes. Patients were stratified into 1 of 4 hierarchical groups according to the most intensive glucose-lowering treatment received during each calendar year. Test strip use was calculated annually for each group over the study period, and the effects of 5 hypothetical policy scenarios of more selective test strip use were assessed. Test strip use increased by almost 250% from 1997 to 2008, with 52.6% (n = 263 513) of included patients receiving a prescription during 2008. Almost half of these patients were at low risk for drug-induced hypoglycemia. In 2008, over 117 million test strips were dispensed in Ontario; however, more focused policy scenarios could have reduced this number by between 9.5 million and 74.5 million test strips. Interpretation Many people who self-monitor their blood glucose are at relatively low risk for drug-induced hypoglycemia. The economic benefits associated with more selective testing could be redirected to more effective interventions for patients with diabetes. Go to: Methods Study design and data sources We conducted a cross-sectional time-series analysis of annual prescription claims for blood glucose test strips reimbursed by the Ontario Public Drug Program over a 12-year period (January 1997 to December 2008) for people in Ontario aged 65 and older. The Ontario Drug Benefit database and the Ont Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Everything You Need To Know About Diabetes Test Strips

Update: A lot of our readers ask us where can they find the best deals for test strips. We personally recommend Amazon. You can check the list of selections they offer by clicking here. Blood glucose test strips play a crucial role in helping you to monitor your daily blood glucose level and giving your doctor the data to adjust your medication to control your diabetes symptoms. Without the help from these little disposable strips, life with diabetes can become even more chaotic than ever. But what exactly are these thin little plastic slip and why are they so expensive? Are there any alternative method I can use? Where can I get the best deal on these test strips? This article will answer many of your questions and concerns regarding these blood glucose test strips: Table of Contents History on Glucose Test Strips How Does the Test Strips Work Why Are the Strips So Expensive? And Why the Price Discrepancy? Why Must Diabetic Patients Use Glucometer and Test Strip? How Often Should You Administer A Blood Glucose Test? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? How Accurate Are the Test Strips? How to Find Out if Your Glucose Monitor is Accurate? What is a Urine Glucose Test? Can’t I Use This Procedure Instead? Expiration of Test Strips Medicare Plan B Coverage for Glucose Test Strips Where to Get the Best Deal on Test Strips? Ways to Save of Test Strips How to Avoid Counterfeit Blood Glucose Test Strips Can You Reuse Test Strips? Can You Make Your Own Test Strip? 4 Most Affordable Meters How to Pick the Right Glucometer? How to Dispose Used Test Strips, Lancets, and Needles? What to Do with All These Test Strip Containers? Selling Your Glucose Test Strips A Good Idea? Odd Way to Earn Some Money Back Questions? History on Glucose Test Strips The first glucomet Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Strips

Diabetes Test Strips

Tweet Blood glucose test strips (diabetes test strips) are a key component of blood glucose testing. These small disposable strips of plastic may look insignificant but they provide a very important role in helping people with diabetes to monitor and control their diabetes. In the vast majority of cases, each meter will take one type of test strip only. There are some blood glucose meters however that take blood ketone strips as well, to test for ketone levels. How do diabetes test strips work? When blood is placed onto the test strip, it reacts with a chemical called glucose oxidase producing gluconic acid from the glucose in the blood. At the other end of the test strip, the meter transfers a current to the test strip. The test strip has electric terminals which allow the meter to measure the current between the terminals. The current between the terminals changes depending on the level of gluconic acid that has been produced. The blood glucose meter then uses an algorithm to work out the blood glucose level based upon the difference in current. Some blood glucose test strips allow the reapplication of more blood to the same test strip if needed during the test. The amount of blood required by a test strip can vary between manufacturers. Generally, between 0.5 μl to 1 μl of blood is required. Some test strips, not so commonly used these days, do not require a meter. When blood is placed on the active part of the strip and then wiped off after a specified number of seconds, the reagent will change colour and the result can be obtained by matching the colour of against a colour chart on the side of the pot. It is less accurate than using a blood glucose meter but the test strips can often be cheaper. Where can I get test strips? Within the UK, blood glucose test strip Continue reading >>

New Criteria For Reimbursing Glucose Test Strips

New Criteria For Reimbursing Glucose Test Strips

The Québec Ministry of Health (Ministre de la Santé) has changed the way RAMQ reimburses glucose test strips that measure capillary glycemia (blood sugar levels measured by pricking the end of a finger). RAMQ used to reimburse the number of test strips that doctors prescribed. However, since May 3rd, 2017, the number of test strips reimbursed in a 365-day period is now determined by a person’s risk of hypoglycemia; in other words, based on treatment. For now, this method applies only to diabetics insured by RPAM, the public medical insurance plan (Régime public d’assurance médicaments). Private insurance companies and benefit-plan administrators have the option of adopting these measures, or not. How many test strips are now reimbursed? Hypoglycemia risk based on treatment Number of test strips reimbursed per 365-day period No risk of hypoglycemia Diabetics treated with lifestyle changes with no prescription for an oral or injectable antidiabetic Diabetics with at least one prescription for an antidiabetic that does not include a sulfonylurea, repaglinide or insulin. 200 test strips Moderate risk of hypoglycemia Diabetics with at least one prescription of a sulfonylurea: gliclazide (Diamicron®), glimepiride (Amaryl®), glyburide (Diabeta®) or repaglinide (GlucoNorm®), but not insulin. 400 test strips High risk of hypoglycemia Diabetics treated with insulin. 3,000 test strips In some cases, a health professional monitoring a person with diabetes may request a supplemental number of reimbursed test strips (100). Such patient situations may include: Not reaching target glycemia levels for 3 or more months; A medical condition affecting glycemic (blood glucose) control; Starting a new antidiabetic medication; A professional situation requiring increased glycemic Continue reading >>

Systematic Review Of Use Of Blood Glucose Test Strips For The Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Systematic Review Of Use Of Blood Glucose Test Strips For The Management Of Diabetes Mellitus

Systematic Review of Use of Blood Glucose Test Strips for the Management of Diabetes Mellitus Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease characterized by the bodys inability to produce sufficient insulin and/or properly use insulin. 1 Worldwide, an estimated 285 million people have diabetes, and this number is projected to increase to 438 million by 2030. 2 In Canada, more than three million people were living with the disease in 2009, and, by 2020, it is expected that this number will rise to 3.7 million. 2 Approximately 10% of patients with diabetes have type 1 diabetes, which is the result of little or no insulin being produced by the body. 3 The majority of patients with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which is a metabolic disorder caused by varying degrees of insulin resistance, where the body usually produces insulin but is unable to use it properly. 3 When inadequately managed, diabetes is likely to result in poor glycemic control. 1 Impaired glycemic control, if prolonged, may result in diabetes-related complications such as ischemic heart disease, stroke, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and lower limb amputation. 4 , 5 Therefore, control of blood glucose levels to reduce a patients risk of developing these complications is an important component of diabetes management. Recommended approaches to improve glycemic control include lifestyle modifications such as weight control, proper nutrition, and adequate exercise; the use of medications such as insulin and oral antidiabetes drugs; and self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG). 5 The purpose of SMBG is to collect detailed information about glucose levels across various time points each day and take ap Continue reading >>

The Most Popular Diabetic Test Strips Of 2015

The Most Popular Diabetic Test Strips Of 2015

There are several brands of diabetic test strips, each with different features, advantages, and prices. Perhaps due to a variety of reasons that are beyond the scope of this article, certain glucose test strips are more popular than others. The purpose of this article is to determine the most popular brands of test strips in 2015. Case Study. Most Searched Phrases Related to Diabetic Test Strips in 2015 Perhaps one effective way for determining the popularity of a product is to look at the number of times people have searched for phrases that describe that product in a given time. We conducted a case study during which we looked at the search traffic for phrases related to brand name test strips in the U.S in 2015. (Source: Google) [su_table] Phrase (Related to Diabetic Test Strips) Average Monthly Searches in Google, 2015 One Touch Ultra FreeStyle Lite One Touch Verio Accu-Chek Compact Plus Bayer Contour True Test Accu-Chek Aviva Plus Bayer Contour Next Precision Xtra Contour Next True Track OneTouch Ultra FreeStyle Insulinx OneTouch Verio True Balance Embrace test strips Accu-Chek Compact Bayer Breeze 2 TrueTest Accu-Chek SmartView Bayer Test Strips One Touch Ultra Blue Breeze 2 TrueTrack Free Style Lite GlucoCard Vital Unistrip Nova Max GlucoCard Expression Advocate Redi-Code CareSens OneTouch Ultra Blue Unistrip1 TrueBalance Arkray GlucoCard Vital AccuChek Aviva Plus CareSens N AccuChek Compact Plus AccuChek SmartView Accu-Chek Smart View Arkray GlucoCard Expression AccuChek Compact Prodigy No Coding Nipro True Test Care Sens N Care Sens Free Style Insulinx Nipro True Track Nipro True Balance Omnis Embrace Nipro TrueTest Advocate Redi-Code Plus Nipro TrueTrack Advocate RediCode Nipro TrueBalance Arkray Gluco Card Vital Arkray Gluco Card Expression Gluco Card Vital G Continue reading >>

Printed Materials For Blood Glucose Test Strips

Printed Materials For Blood Glucose Test Strips

DuPont printed materials for blood glucose test strips align with the world’s most stringent accuracy standards, meeting the needs of patients and biomedical manufacturers worldwide. DuPont supplies leading biomedical manufacturers around the globe with functional electrode inks for enzyme-based amperometric glucose blood concentration measurement. Both biomedical manufacturers and patients depend on DuPont’s strict adherence to quality, consistency, accuracy and stable performance, which guarantees traceable quality control, high-volume product consistency, and well-defined electrochemical activity. These elements, in combination with DuPont’s comprehensive application support, ensure the successful implementation of advanced enzyme blood measurement systems. Continue reading >>

Operon Glucose Test Strips, Clinical, Hospital, Home Purpose

Operon Glucose Test Strips, Clinical, Hospital, Home Purpose

Operon Biotech and Healthcare is an organization focused on important in-vitro diagnostic tools for use in clinical laboratories, Healthcare and point of care testing. We collaborate with the best of companies and work closely with our customers. We then offer our end users unparalleled service, technical support and training. End result is a happy customer, a smiling patient and a Proud WE.Afser Shariff, CEO of the company puts it founded on the belief of providing Stable, Sustainable and Scalable diagnostic tools & Solutions, Operon Biotech intends to bring a portfolio of POCT, HealthCare and Hematology products to Indian market. Our key strength lies in our strong product line, reputed customer base, proven marketing strategies, excellent technical and customer support. We have a notable presence in Hemostasis and POCT devices.We revel in Hematology and Healthcare. We revel in the rich feeling that we derive offering quality products and technical support. We revel in surprising our clients and partners with unique products. We are zealous in what we do and wish to attain Nirvana in that we do! Our logo personifies TEAM. We all are different, think different but have a common goal and that goal is to deliver Health and Happiness.WE in our LOGO is not restrictive to Team Operon! Our Alliance Partners and Clients are integral part of our Logos aesthetics and meaning. Is to work on specific Focus, understand our Customers, improvise on our Products and Services, with aid of rapidly evolving and advancing Technologies and be a substantial player in the Growing healthcare industry. Is to be independent, professional, trustworthy and a reliable healthcare company, a company that can create meaningful jobs, improve the quality of our lives, aid in the growth of nation and Continue reading >>

The Use Of Blood Glucose Test Strips In Select Public Drug Plans, 2008

The Use Of Blood Glucose Test Strips In Select Public Drug Plans, 2008

Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that occurs when the body is either unable to sufficiently produce or properly use insulin. If left uncontrolled, diabetes results in consistently high blood sugar levels, a condition known as hyperglycemia. Over time, hyperglycemia can damage blood vessels, nerves, and organs such as the kidneys, eyes and heart, resulting in serious complications and, ultimately, death.5 Glycemic control is the cornerstone of diabetes management. It may be improved through lifestyle modifications (i.e., weight control, proper nutrition, and adequate exercise), the use of medications (e.g., insulin and oral antidiabetic drugs), and the self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG).6 SMBG is used to check the level of glucose in the blood at a given point in time. The process involves pricking a fingertip to collect a drop of blood, absorbing the blood with a test strip and inserting the test strip into an electronic glucose monitor, which then displays a number on its screen.7 There are three common forms of diabetes: type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes. These forms may differ in their causes, treatments (including recommendations for blood glucose testing) and complications. The following description is provided by the Public Health Agency of Canada.5 Type 1 diabetes, also referred to as “insulindependent diabetes”, is an autoimmune disease that leaves the individual dependent on an external source of insulin for life. Type 1 diabetes typically arises in children and youth. It is estimated that 5% to 10% of Canadians with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes, also referred to as “noninsulin- dependent diabetes mellitus”, is a metabolic disorder that occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin and when the bo Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

How Do Glucometers Work?

How Do Glucometers Work?

Through a pinprick several times a day — but what if diabetics could tell their blood-sugar levels anytime, by glancing at a tattoo?… Monitoring blood sugar levels is a pain for the diabetic — both figuratively and literally. Several times a day, they prick a finger to obtain a blood droplet and apply it to a plastic strip that’s inserted in a glucometer — a hand-held device that tells them if their glucose level is high, low, or right on target. It’s usually the job of the pancreas to keep track of sugar levels and to secrete glucagon and insulin to keep them at 100 or so milligrams per deciliter of blood. But for diabetics — either because their pancreas doesn’t function properly or because their body can’t process the hormones it secretes — glucose testing is a do-it-yourself proposition. And a crucial one. Blood-sugar checks show if it’s time to inject a few units of insulin — or grab a lifesaving snack. That’s where the glucometer comes in. “Current glucometers use test strips containing glucose oxidase, an enzyme that reacts to glucose in the blood droplet, and an interface to an electrode inside the meter,” explains Michael Strano, the Charles and Hilda Roddey Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT. “When the strip is inserted into the meter, the flux of the glucose reaction generates an electrical signal,” he says. “The glucometer is calibrated so the number appearing in its digital readout corresponds to the strength of the electrical current: The more glucose in the sample, the higher the number.” Periodic tests via glucometer play an important part in the diabetic’s treatment plan, but current models fall short in giving a true picture of glucose fluctuations in real time. “The complications of diabetes st Continue reading >>

Nanotechnology In Glucose Testing Strips

Nanotechnology In Glucose Testing Strips

Glucose monitors and testing strips are essential devices in maintaining the health of diabetics and individuals that suffer from urinary tract infections. However, testing materials is often too expensive or impractical for those who require them. An estimated 80% of undiagnosed diabetics live in low- to middle- income areas, reducing the likelihood that these individuals will have access to or be able to afford testing materials [1]. To combat the inaccessibility of glucose monitors and testing strips, researchers at the University of Cambridge have developed reusable, affordable automatic photonic nanosensors with nanotechnology. In a photonic nanosensor, a matrix of phenylboronic acid-functionalized hydrogel is embedded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) through a process known as laser writing, in which a 6 ns (nanosecond, referring to pulse duration) laser is used to organize the AgNPs into a specific pattern [2]. This pattern of AgNPs is a periodic variation (imperfection) in the refraction index of the hydrogel, and will produce a specific wavelength when light passes through it. This is an example of a volume Bragg grating in which a transparent material is modified (in this case with the AgNPs) to produce an interference pattern, which causes the material to reflect a small range of wavelengths and transmit all else [3]. When a user’s glucose levels are high, they expand the hydrogel and alter the spacing of the nanoparticles, causing a wavelength to be emitted which is different in color from the wavelength produced when the gel is contracted [2]. To test glucose levels, individuals would insert a blood, urine, or teardrop sample into the sensor containing the hydrogel matrix embedded with AgNPs, causing the hydrogel to expand to varying dimensions. A light Continue reading >>

More in diabetes