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What Is The Point Of Diabetic Shoes?

Off-loading Diabetic Shoes Help Chronic Wounds Heal Safely

Off-loading Diabetic Shoes Help Chronic Wounds Heal Safely

When you have a wound, ulcer or other medical issue with your feet, your podiatrist might recommend "off-loading." Off-loading is simply the act of removing pressure and weight from the affected area of the foot. This can be done in a variety of ways, including the use of crutches and wheelchairs. However, a preferred option is the off-loading shoe. Off-loading diabetes shoes are designed to alleviate pressure on wounds and ulcers. These shoes are designed with a wide toe box and plenty of room for the foot, as well as soft inserts that are designed to cushion and protect the area of the foot that needs treatment. In some cases, special insoles can be worn with a section removed, thus allowing you to walk normally while keeping pressure away from the trouble area. Other features of the off-loading shoe include: Seamless interiors of the shoe, meaning less chance of further injury A wide design meant to accommodate dressings on wounds and ulcers A sole design that promotes a natural gait, thus reducing pressure on the hip joints Reinforced toe covers that are easily removable for access to the injured area Reusable insoles that work with the shoe to prevent pressure on recurring ulcers There are different types of off-loading diabetes shoes, including full-boot versions used to treat chronic wounds that refuse to heal properly. Some shoes allow you to walk normally in them, while others are designed to be used in conjunction with walkers or crutches, and allow for some weight-bearing. Foot pressure is a leading cause of foot ulcers for those with diabetes. If your foot has deformities, the regular pressure your feet are subjected to can make things even worse. According to Podiatry Today, the best way to combat this problem is by maintaining good circulation, controllin Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Shoes?

What Are Diabetic Shoes?

| Licensed since 2012 Print People with diabetes sometimes develop problems with their feet, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Medicare may cover therapeutic shoes for diabetics (sometimes called diabetic shoes) with severe diabetic foot disease. Why are diabetic shoes important? Diabetics may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This type of nerve damage may make feet vulnerable to injuries in a few different ways, according to the National Institutes of Health: Injuries may take longer to heal because of restricted blood flow. Affected limbs may lose sensation, so it’s more difficult to detect an injury and get it treated promptly. If you lose feeling in your feet, an unnoticed injury can lead to an infection. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) suggests quarterly foot exams for diabetics. In addition, the agency recommends a good regimen of home care. This includes keeping feet clean, inspecting feet for injuries, keeping toenails carefully trimmed, and wearing the right socks and shoes. In addition to neuropathy, complications associated with diabetes may even change the shape of the patient’s foot and weaken the muscles. The National Institute of Health, or NIH, recommends checking with a doctor about special diabetic shoes and/or shoe inserts. In some cases, diabetics may need custom-made shoes to provide extra protection. Medicare coverage for diabetic shoes Medicare Part B may cover therapeutic shoes, or diabetic shoes. In order for diabetic shoes to qualify for coverage, a podiatrist or another kind of qualified doctor has to prescribe them. Additionally, a podiatrist, prosthetist, orthotist, pedorthist, or other qualified type of professional has to provide the therapeutic shoes. Part B has some limits to its coverage of diabetic shoes: Par Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shoes - Diabetes

Diabetic Shoes - Diabetes

Hi friends. I have two questions relating to footwear for Type 2 Diabetics. Do the diabetese shoes really help. Are they worth purchasing. What are your suggestions and recommendations about a comfortable wear of athletic shoes that can be worn on a regular basis for walking. My doctor has asked me to walk for sixty minutes a day and the current stuff that I wear is not very comfortable. It kinds of pinches one of my toes which turned black and blue (near the nail). The podiatrist was not really helpful. I think the shoes I wear currently kind of a shade narrow at the apex of the foot which probably squeezes one of my toes resulting in this problem. I bought a wider pair but that darned thing is "biting me" know-what-i mean ? Also it is a bit heavy. So I am thinking of buying a good quality pair. Normally I never bought expensive branded stuff like Nike or New Balance and just pick up a pair from the super market - not even sure what the brands are. I think it is time to "invest" in a good pair and I would highly appreciate if you could make any recommendations about brands etc. Continue reading >>

10 Best Diabetic Shoes Reviewed

10 Best Diabetic Shoes Reviewed

People with diabetes are more susceptible to foot problems. This health affliction can lead to nerve damage that affects a person’s ability to grasp the exact moment when their feet are injured. Consequently, diabetes elevates the risks for getting serious wounds and ulcers on the feet, which may also become serious enough to lead to amputation. Furthermore, diabetes also impacts the ability of the body to heal. This is because the feet receives less blood and oxygen, therefore it takes more time to recover from even a minor skin irritation. A diabetic foot is also more prone to swelling or edema. You can minimize the risks of both short term and long term foot injury, as a diabetes patient, by wearing a pair of good diabetic shoes. These are available in various types – such as diabetic dress shoes, work shoes or walking shoes. Whatever the type, good diabetic shoes are unified in eliminating the risk of diabetic foot injury and the benefits they offer to the wearer. The optimal diabetic shoes are generally made from breathable materials like suede and leather and are created to cushion and support the heel and ankle. Such shoes also help in the even distribution of weight of the body across the foot to eliminate the problem of pain in the pressure points. By Daniel Gonzalez: The latest update includes a revised list of the top 10 shoes for diabetics. This list features shoes from brands such as Skechers, New Balance, Propet and Orthofeet (who are all know to provide the most comfortable, cushioned & specialized shoes around). We’ve also included the criteria we used to evaluate the best diabetic shoes, and some of the most frequently asked questions about the subject. Featured Recommendations An optimal diabetic shoe also comes with more depth to accommodate cus Continue reading >>

Diabetic Footwear: If The Shoe Fits, Wear It

Diabetic Footwear: If The Shoe Fits, Wear It

When it comes to diabetic wound care, footwear matters – and proper diabetic patient shoe assessment is key. Wound clinicians know how devastating foot amputations are for diabetic patients. But what you might not know is that a whopping 50% of diabetic foot amputations are a direct result of patients wearing improper footwear. Surprised? Unfortunately, this staggering statistic is accurate. But the good news is that there’s something we can do about it. If we get diabetic patients to wear the proper shoes, we can cut diabetic foot amputations in half. Where to start If you want be on the diabetic wound prevention team (and we hope you do), shoe evaluation is key. Which means you must be able to properly assess fit and wear patterns. And the only way to do this is to start by first asking the patient to wear the same shoes to the appointment that he or she wears every day. But take note: a polite request might not do the trick, as patients are commonly tempted to wear different, nicer or newer shoes that won’t get them “in trouble.” So be firm, and explain the importance of a proper footwear assessment and its role in preventing ulceration and amputation. What to look for Once you have your diabetic patient’s shoes in front of you, here are the qualities you will need to look for (and hopefully find): A closed toe that mimics the shape of the foot – a wide toe box that allows toes to move and accommodates any foot deformity. Pointed or open toes are not suitable. An overall firm and snug fit, but with 1cm between the longest toe and the end of the shoe (when the patient is standing). We don’t want added pressure to the tops of the toes or on the toenails. Heels less than 1 inch, because the taller the heel, the greater the pressure on the ball of the foo Continue reading >>

Diabetic (charcot) Foot

Diabetic (charcot) Foot

Diabetes is a condition of elevated blood sugar that affects about 6 percent of the population in the United States, or about 16 million people. Diabetic foot problems are a major health concern and are a common cause of hospitalization. Most foot problems that people with diabetes face arise from two serious complications of the disease: nerve damage and poor circulation. One of the more critical foot problems these complications can cause is Charcot arthropathy, which can deform the shape of the foot and lead to disability. There are treatment options for the wide range of diabetic foot problems. The most effective treatment, however, is prevention. For people with diabetes, careful, daily inspection of the feet is essential to overall health and the prevention of damaging foot problems. Description Nerve damage (neuropathy) is a complication of diabetes that leads to a loss of sensation in the feet. Some people with diabetes can no longer feel when something has irritated or even punctured the skin. A wound as small as a blister can progress to a serious infection in a matter of days. Diabetes also damages blood vessels, decreasing the blood flow to the feet. Poor circulation weakens bone, and can cause disintegration of the bones and joints in the foot and ankle. As a result, people with diabetes are at a high risk for breaking bones in the feet. When a diabetic fractures a bone in the foot, he or she may not realize it because of nerve damage. Continuing to walk on the injured foot results in more severe fractures and joint dislocations. Sharp edges of broken bone within the foot can point downward toward the ground, increasing the risk of chronic foot sores from the abnormal pressure. (Left) This patient with Charcot of the ankle has developed a deformity that pla Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shoes & Education

Diabetic Shoes & Education

GuidePoint Pharmacys accredited diabetes education program, called GuidePoint Diabetes Services, offers diabetes education classes in group sessions and one-on-one consultations. Available at the Brainerd and Crosby pharmacies, GuidePoint Diabetes Services educators include two specially trained pharmacists. Educators are certified by the American Association of Diabetes Educators to assist diabetes sufferers with understanding glucose testing meters and supplies, making diet adjustments and living healthy lifestyles. Call GuidePoint Pharmacy in Brainerd at (218) 829-0347 to learn more about the next diabetes education group session or to schedule a personal consultation. The GuidePoint Pharmacies in Brainerd , Crosby , Rochester and Redwood Falls carry a variety of Dr. Comfort brand diabetic shoes that are specifically designed for people with diabetes. The shoes contain a larger toe box for added comfort and smooth seams on the inside to prevent rubbing and irritation. The GuidePoint staff can take molds of your feet, creating customized foam inserts to help relieve pressure points and prevent ulcer formation and nerve damage, common concerns for a diabetics feet. Best of all, diabetic shoes are a Medicare-eligible benefit, meaning there may be no out of pocket costs for you. Allow us to contact your doctor to see if you meet the Medicare guidelines for coverage and well find shoes that fit your budget as well as your style. 2017 GuidePoint Pharmacy. All rights reserved. All images on this site are subject to copyright, and may not be used without permission. Continue reading >>

Orthotics | Comfort Shoes | North Hollywood, Ca Healthy Feet

Orthotics | Comfort Shoes | North Hollywood, Ca Healthy Feet

Its time to say hello to a better and healthier life with our therapeutic and healthy shoes, socks and inserts. Knowing that diabetes causes poor condition of the feet, we at Healthy Feet Diabetic Shoes, offer the most comfortable therapeutic shoes especially designed to prevent and alleviate such a painful condition. What makes Healthy feet diabetic shoes worth a try: Shoes have extra depth so that insoles can be included and inserted Excellent ventilation so your feet can breathe fairly to avoid bacteria Seamless and lightweight construction to avoid irritation Has the right arch support to avoid pressure point pain Perfect-fitting heel to avoid excessive rubbing Fashionable styles and designs to fit your personality And has the most comfortable socks and insoles to take your comfort to the highest level Healthy Feet Diabetic Shoes are designed to accelerate metabolism process, regenerate blood circulation, and stimulate the anti-fungal functions of the body. At Healthy Feet, your health is our top priority. We give comfort. We value health. Copyright 2011 Healthy Feet Diabetic Shoes, Inc. | All Rights Reserved 10639 Burbank Blvd. North Hollywood, CA 91601 Continue reading >>

Find The Right Shoes For Diabetes

Find The Right Shoes For Diabetes

For most people, a bad shoe day means a blistered heel or painful arch that goes away quickly. But for people with diabetes, poor footwear can trigger serious problems, such as foot ulcers, infections, and even amputation. Foot problems aren't inevitable, though. Ralph Guanci learned the hard way to pick his shoes with care and to stick with wearing them because they're good medicine for his feet. Guanci, 57, a businessman in Carlisle, Massachusetts, was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 25 years ago. For the first two decades, his feet seemed fairly normal, and he gave little thought to footwear. "I wore anything I wanted," he says. But a few years ago, he developed foot trouble: a foot bone injury that prompted recurring, infected blisters on his sole. After doctors cured the problem with surgery and antibiotics, Guanci started wearing only one brand of comfort shoes called SAS that his podiatrist had recommended. "The only times I've violated that, I usually regret it," he says. During one business trip, he ditched his podiatrist-recommended shoes for a fancier pair. "I wanted to look dressy, so I wore an expensive pair of shoes." He wasn't planning to walk much, but after dinner, his companions sprung a surprise plan: a two-mile stroll back to the hotel. "When I got back to my room, my sock was full of blood and there was a huge blister on my foot," Guanci says. He flew home that night and went straight from the airport to his podiatrist's office. The blister, which was on the ball of his foot, forced him onto crutches and took four months to heal, he says. Why are diabetic feet so vulnerable? Diabetes patients -- who number 17.9 million in the U.S. -- know that good blood sugar control reduces risk of complications. But poorly controlled diabetes delivers a double wha Continue reading >>

Proper Footwear For The Diabetic Foot

Proper Footwear For The Diabetic Foot

March 2, 2015by Advanced Tissue 00 Choosing the proper footwear is important to reducing the risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer. Theres a surprisingly high prevalence of diabetic foot ulcers in the U.S. According to the American College of Hyperbaric Medicine, the most common site of infection for people with this metabolic condition is the foot, and ulcers on the lower extremities are the top cause of hospital admissions among this population. As the ACHM reports, about one-quarter of diabetics in America will develop a diabetic foot ulcer, costing more than $15 billion in health care costs. The consequences of these wounds can be devastating, leading to amputation and in severe cases of untreated ulcers, even death. One of the simplest things someone can do to reduce the risk of a wound on the foot is to wear the right shoes. Consider these suggestions for selecting the best shoes and avoiding ulcers with daily wear: According to the National Institutes of Health, it is especially important for people with diabetes to protect their feet from injury by selecting shoes that are snug fitting but not too tight.Dont buy shoes with the intention of stretching them out with wear.Even if you dont feel pressure or tightness, they may be causing blisters or sores that can become infected if left untreated. The NIH suggests wearing new shoes for one to two hours per day for the first couple weeks after you purchase them. This allows you to break them in slowly and steadily in order to reduce the risk of developing a diabetic foot ulcer. Even if your shoes are broken in, the safest precaution for reducing the risk of a wound is to switch to another pair after five hours of wear, according to the NIH. Its important to inspect the insides of your shoes before putting them on Continue reading >>

The Best Shoes For Diabetics Save Your Legs, Wear Diabetic Shoes!

The Best Shoes For Diabetics Save Your Legs, Wear Diabetic Shoes!

Browse: Home The Best Shoes for Diabetics Save Your Legs, Wear Diabetic Shoes! The Best Shoes for Diabetics Save Your Legs, Wear Diabetic Shoes! July 18, 2016 by Jason in Tips&Tricks Has anyone ever told you that having diabetes could make your feet hurt? To many of you, this may come as a surprise. However, in reality, foot problems remain one of the most common and serious complications of diabetes. Poorly controlled blood sugar can cause long-term damage to parts of the body, including the feet. High blood glucose can damage the feet in two ways Nerve Damage Diabetes can damage the nerves in legs and feet, resulting in loss of sensation such as pain, heat or cold. This nerve damage is also known as diabetic neuropathy and can ultimately lead to an open sore, ulcer or an infection. Further, neuropathy can also lead to callus formation, altered walking patterns and unsteadiness. Vascular Damage Diabetes can cause restricted blood flow to legs and feet, thus making it difficult for a sore or an infection to heal. This vascular damage is also known as peripheral vascular disease or PVD. How Serious Foot Complications Develop for People with Diabetes The above figure shows how serious foot complications develop in people with diabetes. According to International Diabetes Federation (IDF), approximately one in four people with diabetes will develop a sore or an ulcer in the feet at some point in their lifetime. If left unchecked, the infection can spread causing gangrene and may require surgery to remove the affected tissue. In extreme cases, if the infection is extensive, it may even require an amputation of the toe, foot or a part of the leg. If you are among those people who have lived with diabetes for some time now or are at risk of developing foot complications, the Continue reading >>

The Society Of Shoe Fitters A Guide To Diabetes And Footwear

The Society Of Shoe Fitters A Guide To Diabetes And Footwear

Our members would not presume to diagnose diabetes and for that reason we are keeping the information here purely footwear and foot health related. A diabetic has two major problem areas that need careful monitoring their eyes and their feet. If you know you are diabetic it does help your shoe fitter to inform them. Our members will always take the utmost care in fitting you, but will appreciate being told as they look carefully at the shoes you select and offer advice and product knowledge. Diabetes can occasionally betray itself in leather footwear. A sufferer often perspires more and the salts in their perspiration can cause a white bloom on a leather shoe (in the same way as walking in the snow and ice and letting shoes dry out.) However if you find your shoes have this bloom do not panic, it may simply be your shoes have got very wet at some point, or may indicate some other condition i.e. Bromidrosis (excessive sweating). If you think you may be diabetic, or if you have any health concerns, your first port of call should be your G.P. A Podiatrist will also be happy to discuss this condition and how it will affect your feet. Go to the Diabetes UK website as this is a mine of information and will point you to a local branch and offer best advice. As diabetes affects the nerve endings it is difficult for diabetics to feel the onset of a foot problem. Because feet are more often out of sight and therefore out of mind, most Doctors and Podiatrists go to great lengths to warn of foot health problems associated with diabetes, as they can be prone to ulcers, and in extreme cases gangrene can be an added complication. Temperature really matters whether it is the weather or your bath water. Extremes of temperature are difficult to judge for a diabetc. Shoes should fit comf Continue reading >>

Qualification For Diabetic Shoes

Qualification For Diabetic Shoes

So often I get asked about diabetic shoes. What does or does not constitute the necessity for diabetic shoes. The easy answer is all diabetics need diabetic shoes but in the end when you work for a company who sells the product, your statements start to sound like marketing. I decided to write this blog to lay out my argument for why all diabetic patients need diabetic shoes. To understand my thinking, first you must understand what diabetic shoes actually are. Diabetic shoes are not much different than non-diabetic shoes The ONLY difference between a diabetic shoe and a regular shoe is that a diabetic shoe comes in three widths Besides that, there is no difference. The difference is arbitrary. Blew your mind right? Well, why do they call them diabetic shoes if the only difference between a diabetic shoe and a standard shoe is how many variations in width are made? Well first thing is simple. All diabetics need shoes and they need to be shoes that someone else picks out for them. The reality is that most of us, you and I, we wear the wrong size shoes. We wear the size we decided we needed 10 or 15 years ago, and we haven’t updated that in a while. We also haven’t tried the varying widths to know exactly which shoe we need. So my first point all diabetics need shoes may have raised a few eyebrows. Diabetics often have reduced sensation in the lower extremities, especially the feet. Diabetic shoes are preventative. They prevent the diabetic from stubbing their toe or getting that piece of glass in their foot. For a non-diabetic these things are almost irrelevant. For a diabetic, they can lead to serious infection and amputation. Diabetics should be wearing shoes to prevent mechanical injury. Period. Next point, when someone else fits the diabetic shoe for a person, th Continue reading >>

20 Best Diabetic Shoes Jobs (hiring Now!) | Simplyhired

20 Best Diabetic Shoes Jobs (hiring Now!) | Simplyhired

Central Arkansas Foot Care - Hot Springs National Park, AR Full time position that requires the ability to utilize current technology to develop durable medical equipment for the fabrication of custom molded ankle - Estimated: $30,000 - $38,000 a yearQuick Apply Perform diabetic urine testing (i.e., clinitest, acetest, etc.). Required to wear uniform and adhere to dress code regarding shoes, jewelry and grooming. An assistant will also help with diabetic foot exams, assist with office surgery and prepare patients for procedures. This is a full-time position. The Medical Assistant will assist physicians in a variety of common office procedures and surgeries, including hands on patient care including strapping, Estimated: $26,000 - $33,000 a yearQuick Apply Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) for Chronic Care Management Salerno Medical Associates - Orange, NJ3.4 ABI, PFT, Echo/EKG, Spirometry, Diabetic shoes, SUDO, etc. Perform routine clinical tasks to support medical staff (Vitals, Back brace, knee brace and shoe Certified Professional Coder - CPC - Medical Billing - Business Office ASC, Anesthesia, Wound Care, Diabetic Shoes, etc. is a plus. Certified Professional Coder CPC - in office work required. LOREN J. MILLER Advanced Foot Specialist - Saint Petersburg, FL Clinical duties include rooming patients, inputting medical histories, obtaining vitals, assisting the doctor with procedures, taking x-rays, wound care and Estimated: $23,000 - $31,000 a yearQuick Apply Eventus WholeHealth - Wilson, NC +2 locations Provides and utilizes all skills taught for treating and caring for the feet including learning about special diabetic conditions, PVD conditions, nail diseases Estimated: $120,000 - $160,000 a yearQuick Apply Extremity Healthcare, Inc. - Atlanta, GA Extremity Healt Continue reading >>

Diabetic & Comfort Shoes | Duluth, Mn

Diabetic & Comfort Shoes | Duluth, Mn

Diabetic and Comfort Shoes is committed to serving our patients with excellent care while providing the optimum results for everyday pain relief and comfort! Our staff includes a Board Certified Pedorthist (C-Ped), a Board Certified Prosthetist (CP) and a Board Certified Fitter who are all trained in foot anatomy, pathology and orthotic devices. Their qualifications have been tested and accepted by the American Board for Certification in Orthotics, Prosthetics, and Pedorthics. Our goal is to treat our patients with the utmost respect while addressing the purpose of their visit. We at Diabetic and Comfort Shoes are here to provide services pertaining to everyday foot problems, shoe fitting, orthoses casting, Arizona brace like casting, and custom molded shoes. We will try to accommodate any and all situations possible within our scope of practice while keeping patient confidentiality. If unable, we will refer the patient to another professional in that field. The patients involvement is very much encouraged and welcomed. Our patients come first and we pride in this statement. Are you a Diabetic? If you answered yes you may qualify for diabetic shoes and inserts at little or no cost to you. Call us for details. Continue reading >>

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