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What Is The Number Of Borderline Diabetes?

What Is Considered Borderline Diabetes?

What Is Considered Borderline Diabetes?

Borderline diabetes is a term for a condition that's now called prediabetes. It's based on the level of blood glucose, also known as blood sugar, when you have fasted (which means you haven't eaten any food overnight). Your doctor will test your blood glucose in the office. If it is below 100 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dL), it is normal. Borderline diabetes or prediabetes occurs when your fasting blood glucose is between 100 and 125 mg/dL. A level of 126 mg/dL or above indicates diabetes. When the diabetes police are in hot pursuit and you are within five miles of a state border you have borderline diabetes. Sorry. I couldn’t resist. In the medical world we use certain fixed blood sugar numbers to determine who has diabetes and who doesn’t. The standards are set by the American Diabetes Association and are adjusted from time to time as new research reveals new truths. So if your blood sugar is above a set threshold you have diabetes. If it’s below a set threshold you don’t. If you fall between the two sets of numbers you’re not a member of either tribe. You aren’t really quite “normal,” but your sugar isn’t high enough to really be considered a person with diabetes either. You have borderline diabetes, prediabetes, or in more technical terms, impaired glucose tolerance. But none of these labels convey the deadly seriousness of the condition. Here’s the truth, no bull, if you have borderline diabetes, full-blown diabetes is on the way. The conversion rate from prediabetes to full blown diabetes is mind numbing, and because of this I especially dislike the term “borderline” as it makes the condition sound somehow less serious than it is. At any rate, on to the numbers. We now use a quick and simple blood test called an A1C to Continue reading >>

Foods A Borderline Diabetic Should Avoid

Foods A Borderline Diabetic Should Avoid

With borderline diabetes, or prediabetes, blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not as high as with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Underlying prediabetes is a condition called insulin resistance. With this condition, the body stops responding normally to insulin, the hormone that enables cells to absorb and use blood sugar, or glucose. Prediabetes occurs when muscle, fat and liver cells have become so resistant to insulin that glucose builds up in the blood. The good news for people with prediabetes is that changes in diet, along with exercise and weight loss, can delay or prevent progression to T2DM. Knowing what foods to avoid helps you create a healthy diet for borderline diabetes. Video of the Day Carbohydrates include sugars, starch and fiber. While fiber passes through the digestive system largely unchanged, sugars are quickly digested and absorbed into the bloodstream. This leads to a rise in blood sugar level, which varies depending on the food source. Fruits, vegetables, dairy products and whole-grain foods are healthful sources of carbohydrates for people with prediabetes because they provide needed fuel for the body along with various other beneficial nutrients. But sugary foods like desserts, candy and sugar-sweetened beverages are high in calories and aren't very nutritious. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends avoiding sugar-sweetened beverages, such as full-calorie sodas, sweet tea, and fruit, energy and coffee drinks. A wide-ranging July 2015 "BMJ" review of 17 studies representing 189.1 million U.S. adults found that regularly drinking sugar-sweetened beverages increases the risk for T2DM by 13 percent for each daily serving. The original risk estimates were higher but were revised to exclude obesity as a contributing factor, as it may ha Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends that blood glucose screening for adults begin at age 45, or sooner if you are overweight and have additional risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. There are several blood tests for prediabetes. Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test This test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the test measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. In general: An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal An A1C level between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates type 2 diabetes Certain conditions can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as if you are pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant). Fasting blood sugar test A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. In general: A fasting blood sugar level below 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — 5.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) — is considered normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 7.0 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. This result is sometimes called impaired fasting glucose. A fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/L) or higher indicates type 2 diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test This test is usually used to diagnose diabetes only during pregnancy. A blood sample is taken after you fast for at least eight hours or overnight. Then you'll drink a sugary solution, and your blood sugar level will be measured again after two hours. In general: A blood sugar level less than 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmo Continue reading >>

Five Borderline Diabetes Symptoms

Five Borderline Diabetes Symptoms

Borderline diabetes symptoms are the things to watch for if you think you might be prediabetic. I call them the big five because doctors mention them the most. The first two are increased thirst and frequent urination. The word diabetes literally means "siphon out". Diabetes has been diagnosed for thousands of years by the increased urine and intense thirst that go along with the disease. Here is what happens. Beta cells in your pancreas are pumping out insulin, the hormone that carries glucose into cells, but the cells are resisting insulin's efforts. That is insulin resistance. Or your beta cells are damaged and cannot respond to the call for insulin as fast as they are supposed to. The end result is the same: too much sugar traveling in your blood. Your body responds by siphoning it out through your kidneys. That takes a lot of water. So you are extra thirsty, and you go to the bathroom often. A urine test would show high sugar content. This is why ancient doctors called diabetes the "sweet urine disease." Those are two of the five warning signs. Third is fatigue. If your cells are resisting insulin, they are still hungry even though plenty of glucose is present, making you tired. Blurred vision is number four. This symptom comes and goes as your blood sugar fluctuates. Eyes are very sensitive, making them a great warning sign that your blood sugar is not normal. Number five is the newest of the borderline diabetes symptoms. Are you sleeping less than six hours a night? High blood sugar might be the reason you cannot sleep longer. These are the big five borderline diabetes symptoms: Excessive urination Increased thirst Fatigue Blurred vision Sleeping 5-1/2 hours or less a night You may not notice any of these borderline diabetic symptoms but still have prediabetes. T Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

What Is The Glucose Number For Borderline Diabetes?

What Is The Glucose Number For Borderline Diabetes?

Borderline diabetes is a stage in the potential development of diabetes when there is too much glucose in your blood, but not enough that you are diagnosed as diabetic. An elevated blood glucose level is a risk factor for becoming diabetic. Identification Doctors use the same tests to diagnose borderline diabetes and diabetes. Based on the results, you are diagnosed as normal, pre-diabetic, or diabetic. Types The oral glucose tolerance test measures your blood glucose level after you fast and then drink a high-glucose liquid. If your blood glucose level is 140 to 200 mg/dl during this test, you are borderline, or pre-diabetic. The intravenous or fasting plasma glucose test measures the amount of glucose in your blood after an injection of glucose into your bloodstream. If your blood glucose level is 100 to 126 mg/dl during this test, you are borderline, or pre-diabetic. Fun Fact Mg stands for milligrams. Dl stands for deciliter. One hundred mg/dl (100 mg/dl) means that your blood glucose level is equivalent to having 100 milligrams of glucose in one deciliter of blood. Significance Learning that your blood glucose level is borderline is an opportunity to prevent a serious disease. If you are borderline, lose weight, get regular exercise and eat well. You might never become diabetic. Expert insight Many health care professionals do not like to differentiate between borderline diabetes and diabetes because people often do not take “borderline” or ‘pre-diabetic” seriously. Barbara El started and sold two businesses before becoming a professional writer in 2003. She specializes in educational, technical, garden and business writing, and her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications. She holds a master’s degree in education and enjoys voluntee Continue reading >>

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

What You Need To Know- Borderline Diabetes Diabetes does not just develop overnight. Borderline diabetes may have no symptoms at all, or you may experience 1 or more of the symptoms described below. You can prevent diabetes if you identify borderline diabetes early. What You Need To Do- Borderline Diabetes If you have any of the symptoms described below then get checked out by your health care provider. If you are in a high risk group than you also should be screen for prediabetes, even if you do not have symptoms. I was stopped at a local function recently and the person I was speaking to told me she was recently diagnosed with borderline diabetes. My acquaintance was very concerned because she read and heard about many of the complications of diabetes; and she wanted to know what this meant for her. She asked me things like “do I need to check my blood sugar all the time now,” “do I need to eat differently,” and “am I going to have to start taking medications?” While I discuss the answers to many of these particular questions in a previous post, I am always struck, in this day of the news coverage of obesity and the diabetes epidemic, how many people have not heard of borderline diabetes and its complications. What Is Borderline Diabetes? Actually, there is no medical diagnosis called “borderline diabetes.” Rather, borderline diabetes refers to a medical condition called prediabetes. This is when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed with type II diabetes. People with borderline diabetes or prediabetes are more likely to develop type II diabetes and may already have some of the signs or symptoms of diabetes. Many times patients with borderline diabetes (prediabetes) will not have any signs or symptoms. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Borderline diabetes, also called prediabetes, is a condition that develops before someone gets type 2 diabetes. It’s also known as impaired fasting glucose or glucose intolerance. It basically means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but they’re not quite high enough to be considered diabetes. During the prediabetes phase, your pancreas usually still produces enough insulin in response to ingested carbohydrates. The insulin is less effective at removing the sugar from the bloodstream, though, so your blood sugar remains high. This condition is called insulin resistance. If you have prediabetes, you should know you’re not alone. In 2015, it was estimated that 84.1 million people age 18 and older had the condition. That’s 1 in 3 Americans. Having prediabetes doesn’t mean you’ll definitely develop diabetes. It is a warning of what could lie ahead, however. People with prediabetes have a 5 to 15-fold higher risk for type 2 diabetes than someone with normal blood sugar levels. Those chances increase if you don’t make any healthy changes to your diet or activity habits. “Prediabetes is not pre-problem,” says Jill Weisenberger, MS, RD, CDE, and author of “Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week.” Someone with insulin resistance in its early stages can develop type 2 diabetes if it continues long enough. Only 10 percent of people with prediabetes even know they have it because they don’t display any symptoms. “Often, people consider these symptoms part of their normal day, so they’re ignored,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and co-author of “Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.” Any of these risk factors can increase your chances of developing prediabetes: being inacti Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

The term borderline diabetes refers to a condition called prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classed as type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is to be considered a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that 10 to 23 percent of people with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Prediabetes can be accompanied by other risk factors. It is associated with conditions such as obesity, especially abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood fat levels and low levels of "good" cholesterol. When these risk factors "cluster" together in a person, there is a higher risk of not just type 2 diabetes but heart disease and stroke as well. Other medical terms used when talking about prediabetes include: Symptoms of borderline diabetes Prediabetes is not the same as diabetes. However, neither prediabetes nor diabetes have clear symptoms. Both can go unnoticed until prediabetes has progressed to type 2 diabetes, or until another complication such as a heart attack occurs. Some people may experience symptoms as their blood sugars remain high. Passing urine more often and increased thirst can be symptoms of type 2 diabetes before it is diagnosed and treated. Prediabetes is not found unless testing is done for it. Testing is carried out when there are risk factors that make prediabetes more likely. Causes and risk factors of borderline diabetes The main risk factors for prediabetes are being overweight or obese, not getting enough exercise, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors include: Drinking a lot of high-sugar drinks may also increase the risk. One study found that people who regularly drink sugary products - 1 or 2 cans of soda a day, for ex Continue reading >>

Is 'borderline' Diabetes Really Diabetes?

Is 'borderline' Diabetes Really Diabetes?

I just learned that I'm a "borderline" diabetic, even though my blood glucose reading was very close to normal. Now I'm not sure what to do. Should I be consistently checking my blood sugar level, eating differently, or taking medication as though I actually have diabetes? I don't want to develop diabetes, but I don't want to take unnecessary precautions either. — Sue, New Jersey Great question! Now that you've been diagnosed with prediabetes, prevention is key. Prediabetes is characterized by either impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Both of these terms refer to the level of sugar in the bloodstream, and they're both ways of saying that you have prediabetes. If your fasting glucose level (a test in which blood is drawn after six hours without food) is between 100 and 125 mg/dl, you have IFG. If your blood sugar level two hours after a glucose challenge test is between 139 and 200 mg/dl, you have IGT. Okay — now that we have the classification straight, why should you be worried about these numbers if yours are not in the diabetic range? Here's why: As your blood glucose rises above the normal level, your risk of developing damage in the body's small blood vessels, and ultimately your risk of a heart attack or stroke, also rises. In addition, having abnormal glucose levels is a risk factor for developing outright diabetes in the future. By bringing you blood sugar levels back in the normal range, you can probably prevent the onset of diabetes and other complications, such as coronary artery disease. It is not absolutely essential to frequently check your glucose levels at home as long as you and your doctor monitor them periodically. The precautions that you can and should take to prevent complications and the onset of diabetes consi Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. But it’s not too late to turn things around. If you have it (like 86 million other Americans), your blood sugar (glucose) level is higher than it should be, but not in the diabetes range. People used to call it "borderline" diabetes. Normally, your body makes a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar. When you have prediabetes, that system doesn't work as well as it should. You might not be able to make enough insulin after eating, or your body might not respond to insulin properly. Prediabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease or have a stroke. But you can take action to lower those risks. Your doctor will give you one of three simple blood tests: Fasting plasma glucose test. You won't eat for 8 hours before taking this blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 100 Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 100-125 Diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 or higher Oral glucose tolerance test. First, you'll take the fasting glucose test. Then you'll drink a sugary solution. Two hours after that, you'll take another blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 140 after the second test Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 140-199 after the second test Diabetes if your blood sugar is 200 or higher after the second test Hemoglobin A1C (or average blood sugar) test. This blood test shows your average blood sugar level for the past 2 to 3 months. Doctors can use it to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes or, if you already know you have diabetes, it helps show whether it's under control. The results are: Normal: 5.6% or less Prediabetes: 5.7 to 6.4% Diabetes: 6.5% or above You may need to take the test again to confirm the results. Lifestyle change Continue reading >>

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

8 Actions To Take If You Have Prediabetes

Changing the Path to Type 2 A whopping 86 million Americans have prediabetes. That’s according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) -- that's 37 percent of American adults over age 20 and 51 percent of adults over age 65. Research shows about 70 percent of people with prediabetes will develop type 2 diabetes over time. Despite these scary stats, only 11 percent of people who have prediabtes know it. The good news is you can prevent or slow the progression of prediabetes to type 2. Numerous research studies conducted over the last 30 years show that early and aggressive management with continued vigilance over time is what prevents or delays type 2 diabetes. And the earlier you detect it and put your plan into action, the better. Here are eight ways to manage prediabetes. 1. Get Tested to Know for Sure. Do you have family -- parents or siblings -- with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes? Are you carrying extra weight around your middle? Don't get enough exercise? These are a few of the risk factors for prediabetes. A good first step to see if you are at high risk is to use the American Diabetes Association (ADA) Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test. You can take the test by visiting diabetes.org/risk. If you’re at high risk, schedule an appointment with your health care provider to get a check of your blood glucose level -- or, better yet, your A1C (an average of your blood glucose over two to three months). See the blood test results to diagnose prediabetes on the next page. 2. Max Out Your Insulin-Making Reserves. It's well known that at the center of the storm of the slow and steady onset of prediabetes is insulin resistance -- the body's inability, due to excess weight and genetic risk factors, to effectively use the insulin th Continue reading >>

If You Are Borderline Diabetic What Can You Do?

If You Are Borderline Diabetic What Can You Do?

Being borderline diabetic is pretty painless. It's an invisible club, and you probably weren't aware when you slipped into it. In fact, the club itself is hard to define. Here's how you became a member, and how to get out. If there were borderline diabetes symptoms that could serve as warning signs, the prediabetes club would lose members fast. The problem is that the trip from normal to borderline diabetic begins with high blood sugar. How do you know if it is high, and what is normal? An accurate way to find out if you are in this club, although it takes several hours, is the glucose tolerance test or GTT. It will give you the best picture of your blood sugar levels. But the quick way to find out if you are borderline diabetic is a fasting blood test. After you've fasted 8 hours or overnight, you visit your doctor to get a fingerstick test. The nurse will prick your finger to put a drop of blood on a little test strip. She will take this to a glucose monitor. In just a few seconds the monitor gives her a number. If that number is under 100, you are considered normal, although the perfect fasting number is 80. If the number is over 100 but under 125 you are going to be labeled borderline diabetic, or prediabetic. It might be a good idea to get more than one blood check to be sure. A number over 125 means you will begin treatment because you are now a type 2 diabetic. Treatment usually begins with an oral medication right away to lower your blood sugar. Your doctor will also order blood tests for cholesterol levels and liver health. Target levels for your blood pressure will now be lower. That's because your risk for heart disease just tripled But if your blood sugar is in the range of 100-125 you are prediabetic, a term doctors prefer instead of borderline diabetic. Yo Continue reading >>

How Serious Is Prediabetes?

How Serious Is Prediabetes?

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), over 84 million Americans had prediabetes in 2015. But how big a problem is prediabetes? Is prediabetes a real disease? Or are they just trying to scare people, sell medicines, and get more money for diabetes services? Let’s see. What is prediabetes? According to the Centers for Disease Control, prediabetes means blood sugars that are higher than normal, but not high enough to qualify as diabetes. It’s what used to sometimes be called “borderline diabetes.” Prediabetes is a numbers game. There are no symptoms that define it. The term “prediabetes” classes people with only slightly high sugars as having an illness. Some experts strongly dislike the term, because it sounds like a stage on the way to diabetes. It can be, but many people never get there. It depends on your life and how you live it. A person can be classed with prediabetes in three ways: • Impaired fasting glucose (IFG): A fasting blood glucose between 100–125 mg/dl (5.6–7.0 mmol/l). • Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT): An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) result from 140–199 mg/dl. The person is given a sweet drink and his glucose is tested one and/or two hours later. An OGTT was the first test used to diagnose prediabetes, but it’s used much less now because of the time, difficulty, and expense involved. • Hemoglobin A1C: An HbA1c level of 5.7% to 6.4%. HbA1c is a rough measure of a person’s average glucose over the last 2–3 months. Some of the increased number of people with prediabetes is from the newer tests. More people are being tested, the cutoffs have been lowered, so more cases are being found. But what is the significance of these numbers? According to Australian health professionals writing on this website, IFG ma Continue reading >>

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