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What Is The National Diabetes Prevention Program?

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

Ymca's Diabetes Prevention Program

More than 200 Ys across the country help thousands of people reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes with YMCA’s Diabetes Prevention Program. This small-group program helps people with prediabetes eat healthier, increase their physical activity and lose weight, which can delay or even prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic disease that causes blood sugar levels to rise higher than normal. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people. A condition called prediabetes occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. More than 86 million Americans have prediabetes and are at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes has no cure, but prediabetes can be reversed. Chances are you know at least one person with diabetes and probably more than one with prediabetes. To find out if you are at risk, take this quick test. Then share the test with friends and family. The Y Can Help If you find out you or someone you know is at risk for developing diabetes, the YMCA's Diabetes Prevention Program can help. Find out if a Y near you runs the program. Continue reading >>

Programs & Initiatives In Communities Diabetes Prevention

Programs & Initiatives In Communities Diabetes Prevention

Prevent type 2 diabetes with the Diabetes Prevention Program Find education and support across Minnesota for people who have prediabetes or are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) is a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-led, proven lifestyle change program that can help people with prediabetes cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. A trained lifestyle coach works with participants to teach lifestyle skills needed to make lasting changes — like eating healthier, adding physical activity and managing stress. The goal of this year-long program is for participants to lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight and gain 150 minutes of weekly physical activity. Program participants meet weekly for 16 weeks over an initial six-month period, and monthly over the next six months. The DPP curriculum is based on findings from the Diabetes Prevention Program research study, a randomized controlled trial conducted by the National Institutes of Health. This study showed that people with prediabetes who lost a modest amount of weight — 5 to 7 percent, or about 15 to 20 pounds for most people — reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent over a three year period. Diabetes Prevention Program The DPP is offered across Minnesota in health care, community and worksite settings. Find a nearby program by following one of these links below. Learn about diabetes management at: Programs & Initiatives in Communities – Diabetes Management Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

Hudson Headwaters Health Network National Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle coaching session. Photo credit: Pepe Productions. The statistics are startling. One in three Americans is pre-diabetic, which translates to more than 110,000,000 individuals affected. Alarmingly, more than 90 percent are unaware that they’re pre-diabetic. The good news is that diabetes is largely preventable. With funding from the New York State Health Foundation (NYSHealth), AHI partnered with Adirondack Health, Hudson Headwaters Health Network, UVM Health Network – CVPH and Washington County Public Health to launch the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Registered nurse Greg Freeman is the UVM Health Network – CVPH National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) Director AND a participant in the program. After learning of his diabetes risk, Greg followed the NDPP recommendations and lost 81 lbs. Greg is an enthusiastic advocate of the program and one of the participants featured in the new AHI NDPP video showcasing how the program works. Watch the videos The new AHI NDPP video features interviews with a lifestyle coach and program participants explaining how lifestyle changes have made a difference. A second video provides a provider-focus. Watch the AHI NDPP Provider Video. Enrollees in NDPP can expect lifestyle coach support, which teaches how to make better food choices, encourages increased physical activity and importantly creates skills to maintain the newly-learned behaviors to continue to be successful. Read Greg’s story In an interview, Greg Freeman shares why he was successful with the NDPP program: Read the interview. More Information Join an existing NDPP program: Hudson Headwaters Health Network: Jennifer Leszyk, 518.824.2336 Implement an on-site NDPP: visit the Center Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

On this page: The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a major multicenter clinical research study aimed at discovering whether modest weight loss through dietary changes and increased physical activity or treatment with the oral diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) could prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in study participants. At the beginning of the DPP, participants were all overweight and had blood glucose, also called blood sugar, levels higher than normal but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes—a condition called prediabetes. The DPP found that participants who lost a modest amount of weight through dietary changes and increased physical activity sharply reduced their chances of developing diabetes. Taking metformin also reduced risk, although less dramatically. The DPP resolved its research questions earlier than projected and, following the recommendation of an external monitoring board, the study was halted a year early. The researchers published their findings in the February 7, 2002, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. DPP Study Design and Goals In the DPP, participants from 27 clinical centers around the United States were randomly divided into different treatment groups. The first group, called the lifestyle intervention group, received intensive training in diet, physical activity, and behavior modification. By eating less fat and fewer calories and exercising for a total of 150 minutes a week, they aimed to lose 7 percent of their body weight and maintain that loss. The second group took 850 mg of metformin twice a day. The third group received placebo pills instead of metformin. The metformin and placebo groups also received information about diet and exercise but no intensive motivational counseling. A fourth group was t Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

The purpose of the present article is to provide a detailed description of the highly successful lifestyle intervention administered to 1,079 participants, which included 45% racial and ethnic minorities and resulted in a 58% reduction in the incidence rate of diabetes (2). The two major goals of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) lifestyle intervention were a minimum of 7% weight loss/weight maintenance and a minimum of 150 min of physical activity similar in intensity to brisk walking. Both goals were hypothesized to be feasible, safe, and effective based on previous clinical trials in other countries (3–7). The methods used to achieve these lifestyle goals include the following key features: 1) individual case managers or “lifestyle coaches;” 2) frequent contact with participants; 3) a structured, state-of-the-art, 16-session core-curriculum that taught behavioral self-management strategies for weight loss and physical activity; 4) supervised physical activity sessions; 5) a more flexible maintenance intervention, combining group and individual approaches, motivational campaigns, and “restarts;” 6) individualization through a “toolbox” of adherence strategies; 7) tailoring of materials and strategies to address ethnic diversity; and finally 8) an extensive network of training, feedback, and clinical support. RATIONALE FOR DPP LIFESTYLE INTERVENTION At the time the DPP was being designed, evidence from a number of observational studies and three intervention studies (3–5) suggested that lifestyle intervention might reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Although none of the three intervention studies was a randomized controlled trial, they all suggested that modest changes in lifestyle could lower the risk of diabetes. In the Malmo study (3), parti Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

According to the Centers for Disease Control, one out of three American adults has prediabetes – meaning their blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal, putting them at high risk for diabetes. You could be at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes if you: are 45 years of age or older are overweight have a family history of type 2 diabetes are physically active fewer than three times per week ever gave birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds ever had diabetes while pregnant (gestational diabetes), or have been diagnosed with prediabetes Take this assessment on the CDC's website to find out if you are at risk for developing diabetes. Mon Health Medical Center’s National Diabetes Prevention Program can help reduce your risk for diabetes. Research has shown that making small changes – including making better food choices, increasing physical activity, and reducing stress – can significantly reduce your risk for developing diabetes. This program will educate and support you in making those important lifestyle changes. To participate in the program, you must be at high risk for developing diabetes, have been diagnosed by a physician as having prediabetes, or had gestational diabetes in a pregnancy. The National Diabetes Prevention Program is a year-long program and is free of charge, but space is limited and pre-registration is required. It is not necessary to have a physician referral to participate, provided you meet the prediabetes requirements. For more information: Andrea S. McCarty, MS, RDN, LD, CDE Diabetes Education Coordinator 304-598-1805 [email protected] Watch the Video To Learn More about Pre-diabetes: Continue reading >>

What Is The National Dpp?

What Is The National Dpp?

National Diabetes Prevention program – or National DPP – is a partnership of public and private organizations working to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. The partners work to make it easier for people with prediabetes to participate in evidence-based, affordable, and high-quality lifestyle change programs to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes and improve their overall health. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP) is an evidence-based lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes. It can help people cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half. The Diabetes Prevention Program research study showed that making modest behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weight—that is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. These lifestyle changes reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with prediabetes. Participants work with a lifestyle coach in a group setting to receive a 1-year lifestyle change program that includes 16 core sessions (usually 1 per week) and 6 post-core sessions (1 per month). For more information about the National Diabetes Prevention Program curriculum, go to www.cdc.gov/diabetes/prevention or watch the CDC's Diabetes Prevention Program video online, or download and print the National DPP Infographic (PDF). What Is the Benefit of Being Part of a National DPP? Various organizations throughout Utah will soon be part of the National DPP, led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It is proven to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay development of type 2 diabetes. Being part of a group provides support from other people who are facing similar challenges and trying to make the same changes you are. Together you can celebrate successes and find ways to overcome obstacles. Eligible Participants The target for this program are adults 18 and older who are at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes based on fasting glucose or A1C or via a short risk survey. You can download and print the CDC Prediabetes Infographic (PDF) for more information. National DPP Features Trained lifestyle Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

National Diabetes Prevention Program (dpp)

Yes! Hearing that you have prediabetes is not a death sentence, but means you need to take action today. You don't have to do this alone. The Diabetes Prevention Program can help. It's the first step to a brighter future. If you have prediabetes, now is the time for prevention. The Diabetes Prevention Program can help you take charge of your health to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. What is the Diabetes Prevention Program? The Diabetes Prevention Program groups meet once a week for 16 weeks, and then once a month for 6 months to maintain healthy lifestyle changes. During each session, your lifestyle coach will teach a lesson and lead a group discussion. You will learn to: Eat healthy Add physical activity to your life Manage stress Stay on track when eating out The Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle coaches have the experience and training to help you reach your goals. Your lifestyle coach will help you: Learn the facts about healthy eating and physical activity and explain how these behaviors will help reduce your risk for type 2 diabetes Set and meet your goals Build relationships with other participants Work as a group to meet challenges Understand and respond to your food cues Stay motivated Solve problems that can get in the way of healthy changes What is the benefit of being part of a Diabetes Prevention Program? (Other than preventing a chronic disease that has no cure.) The Diabetes Prevention Program is led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It is proven to help people with prediabetes prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. As part of the Diabetes Prevention Program group, you will work with other participants and a trained lifestyle coach to learn the skills you need to make lasting changes. These changes include losing a modest amount of weigh Continue reading >>

Do I Have Prediabetes?

Do I Have Prediabetes?

National Diabetes Prevention Program The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program offers scientifically proven and effective lifestyle change programs that can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. The program can show you how to make better food choices, be more physically active, and find helpful ways to cope with problems and stress. You'll work with a trained lifestyle coach and a small group of people who are all working towards the same goal. It’ll last for 1 year (including meetings about once per week in the first 6 months). The hundreds of local community partners are required by CDC to meet high standards and prove results. You can do it in person, or online. This is a proven program to motivate and support people with prediabetes to make practical, real-life changes, and cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by more than half. That's kind of big news. The hundreds of organizations across the U.S. that offer these programs are focused on one thing only — positive results. So use our program locator to find one near you. Usually, your doctor can tell you if you qualify. It's generally based on your body mass index (which is based on your height and weight), your blood sugar levels (blood test), your age (must be 18 or older), and if you have a history of gestational diabetes (meaning you developed diabetes when you were pregnant). You may also qualify based on results from the online risk test. Just one more reason to take it! Costs for the program are often covered by insurance providers or employers. For some people, there may be a cost. Check with your employer or insurance provider to see if the program is a covered benefit for you. Watch how Mike joined the National Diabetes Prevention Program and found support to make healthy lifestyle Continue reading >>

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (mdpp) Expanded Model

Background Diabetes affects more than 25 percent of Americans aged 65 or older, and its prevalence is projected to increase approximately two-fold for all U.S. adults (ages 18-79) by 2050 if current trends continue. We estimate that Medicare spent $42 billion more in the single year of 2016 on beneficiaries with diabetes than it would have spent if those beneficiaries did not have diabetes; per-beneficiary, Medicare spent an estimated $1,500 more on Part D prescription drugs, $3,100 more for hospital and facility services, and $2,700 more in physician and other clinical services for those with diabetes than those without diabetes (estimates based on fee-for-service, non-dual eligible, over age 65 beneficiaries). Fortunately, type 2 diabetes can usually be delayed or prevented with health behavior changes. The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program (MDPP) expanded model is a structured behavior change intervention that aims to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes among Medicare beneficiaries with an indication of prediabetes. This model is an expansion of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) model test, which was tested through the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation’s Health Care Innovation Awards. The final rule establishing the expansion was finalized in the Calendar Year (CY) 2017 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (PFS) final rule published in November 2016. On November 2, 2017, CMS issued the CY 2018 PFS final rule, which established policies related to the set of MDPP services, including beneficiary eligibility criteria, the MDPP payment structure, and supplier enrollment requirements and compliance standards aimed to enhance program integrity. The MDPP Expanded Model The Medicare Diabetes Prevention Program expanded model is a structured intervention with t Continue reading >>

Update On The National Diabetes Prevention Program

Update On The National Diabetes Prevention Program

Today's Dietitian Vol. 18 No. 4 P. 24 Learn what the National DPP is all about and how dietitians can get involved. A massive, multifaceted problem often requires a solution of the same proportions. Diabetes is a health crisis dietitians know well, and the numbers of those who have the disease or may develop it are staggering. But through the National Diabetes Prevention Program (National DPP), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), along with hundreds of organizations, stakeholders, and trained professionals are working to reach and then help millions of Americans delay and possibly prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes. The CDC estimates that 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, and 8 million of them don't even know it. What's worse, prediabetes affects even more people—an estimated 86 million people aged 20 and older. The vast majority, about 90% of people with elevated blood glucose that isn't high enough to be considered diabetes, have yet to be diagnosed. That's crucial, because prediabetes not only puts people at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes, it also puts them at higher risk of heart disease and stroke, according to the 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report. But if the CDC and a whole host of other organizations across the country have anything to say about it, type 2 diabetes won't be a reality for the many millions of Americans they seek to reach through the National DPP. What Is the National DPP? Established five years ago, the National DPP is the largest effort of its kind to prevent type 2 diabetes. Managed by the CDC, the National DPP is a framework built on the National Institutes of Health's landmark DPP study that concluded in 2002, which showed lifestyle modifications, including healthful eating, moderate weight loss, an Continue reading >>

Curricula And Handouts

Curricula And Handouts

Your organization must use an approved curriculum that meets the CDC requirements for recognition. Newly developed curricula must be submitted, reviewed, and approved by CDC prior to its use. On this page, learn about curriculum requirements and download a CDC-developed curriculum in English or Spanish. For questions and more information about the PreventT2 curriculum visit the Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) or PreventT2 Resources. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program

National Diabetes Prevention Program

Led by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) It's time to take charge of your health. Prevent Type 2 diabetes with the National Diabetes Prevention Program! If you have been told you have prediabetes or think you are at risk, participating in this program will help you: Learn the skills you need to lose weight, be more physically active and manage stress Connect with a lifestlye coach to guide and encourage you Gain support from other members who have similar goals This is a FREE 12-month program. The class start date is November 2, 2017 at 2:30 p.m. For an overview of this program, attend a session on one of these dates: September 7, 21 at 2:30 p.m. Call 702-369-7560 to register. Class Dates: Thursdays November 2, 16, 30, 2017 December 7,14, 28, 2017 January 11, 18, 25, 2018 February 8, 22, 2018 March 8, 22, 2018 April 5, 19, 2018 May 10, 31, 2018 June 14, 2018 July 12, 2018 August 16, 2018 September 20, 2018 October 4, 2018 Time: 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. Location: Desert Springs Hospital Diabetes Treatment Center 2075 East Flamingo Road #225 Las Vegas, NV 89119 What is prediabetes? This means your blood sugar level is higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. Nearly 90 percent of adults who have prediabetes don't know they have it. Those who have prediabetes combined with poor weight management and/or minimal physical activity could develop type 2 diabetes within five years. Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Prevention Program (ndpp)

National Diabetes Prevention Program (ndpp)

Are You at Risk? Our interactive diabetes risk assessment test can help you determine if you are at risk of developing pre-diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with Diabetes, learn to manage it through workshops in the Diabetes Self-Management Program (DSMP). The Diabetes Risk test asks you to answer some questions about potential risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Your results are not saved in any way. The test takes less than a minute and could save your life! In this evidence-based year-long program, small groups of participants meet weekly with a trained Lifestyle Coach for a minimum of 16 weekly sessions in the first 6 months followed by a second 6 month period containing at least one session per month concluding the program in one full year. The year is focused on lifestyle change strategies that can help participants to lose small amounts of weight and increase physical activity to significantly decrease their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Sessions focus on healthy eating, increasing physical activity, and learning skills to maintain weight loss. This is a proven program for people with pre-diabetes or who are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes and who are ready to make achievable and realistic lifestyle changes. The workshops The National Diabetes Prevention Program (NDPP) lifestyle change workshop promoted and recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is an evidence-based program developed specifically to prevent type 2 diabetes. It is designed for people who have prediabetes or are at risk for type 2 diabetes, but who do not already have diabetes. A trained lifestyle coach facilitates the program and will encourage you to make some changes to aspects of your lifestyle, like eating healthier, reducing str Continue reading >>

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