diabetestalk.net

What Is The Most Important Risk Factor For Developing Type Ii Diabetes?

Risk Factors For Diabetes Updated For 2017

Risk Factors For Diabetes Updated For 2017

Recent studies are showing that a lack of Vitamin D could be a risk factor for diabetes. Vitamin D plays a role in reducing your bodys resistance to insulin. If theres not enough Vitamin D in the body, it can impair the ability of insulin to work as well as it should. There are other areas in which Vitamin D contributes to diabetes prevention, such as glucose resistance and helping to regulate calcium in the cells (which can also impair the effect of insulin). Reducing the Risk: Make sure you are getting plenty of Vitamin D each day. Because Vitamin D is hard to intake through diet alone, you may want to consider alternatives, such as a vitamin supplement. Talk to a doctor to learn more about what your needs may be. Prediabetes, also called Glucose Intolerance, is a condition in which the body does not metabolize glucose quickly, resulting in higher blood sugar levels (126 mg/dl). These levels are not yet high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes (200mg/dl), but the health impacts of diabetes can begin to manifest. There are 84 million Americans with prediabetes, many of whom do not know they are ill. People with prediabetes are at extreme risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Reducing the Risk: Prediabetes is often the result of being overweight,obese, or having a poor diet. Consider losing weight and making healthier choices in the foods you eat. Pancreatitis is a disease of the pancreas that has been linked to an increased risk factor for diabetes. Pancreatitis occurs when the pancreas becomes inflamed, usually from digestive enzymes that activate while still in the pancreas. One of the potential long-term effects secondary diabetes, which is a type of diabetes that develops because of another medical condition. The two most common causes of pancreatitis are ex Continue reading >>

What Increases My Risk Of Diabetes?

What Increases My Risk Of Diabetes?

There are three major types of the disease: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. With all three, your body can't make or use insulin. One of every four people with diabetes doesn't know they have it. That amounts to about 7 million Americans. Might you be one of them? Read on to see if your risk of having diabetes is high. This type usually starts in childhood. Your pancreas stops making insulin. You have type 1 diabetes for life. The main things that lead to it are: Family history. If you have relatives with diabetes, chances are strong you’ll get it, too. Anyone who has a mother, father, sister, or brother with type 1 diabetes should get checked. A simple blood test can diagnose it. Diseases of the pancreas. They can slow its ability to make insulin. Infection or illness. Some infections and illnesses, mostly rare ones, can damage your pancreas. If you have this kind, your body can't use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. Type 2 usually affects adults, but it can begin at any time in your life. The main things that lead to it are: Obesity or being overweight. Research shows this is a top reason for type 2 diabetes. Because of the rise in obesity among U.S. children, this type is affecting more teenagers. Impaired glucose tolerance. Prediabetes is a milder form of this condition. It can be diagnosed with a simple blood test. If you have it, there’s a strong chance you’ll get type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance. Type 2 diabetes often starts with cells that are resistant to insulin. That means your pancreas has to work extra hard to make enough insulin to meet your body's needs. Ethnic background. Diabetes happens more often in Hispanic/Latino Americans, African-Americans, Native Americans, Asian-Americans, Pacific Islanders, and Alaska n Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

INTRODUCTION Type 2 diabetes mellitus is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and relative impairment in insulin secretion. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, but is heterogeneous and both genetic factors affecting insulin release and responsiveness and environmental factors, such as obesity, are important. The prevalence of and risk factors for type 2 diabetes will be reviewed here. The pathogenesis, including genetic susceptibility, and the diagnostic criteria for diabetes are discussed elsewhere. (See "Pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus" and "Clinical presentation and diagnosis of diabetes mellitus in adults".) LIFETIME RISK/PREVALENCE It is estimated that diabetes affects 387 million people worldwide [1]. Among adults in the United States, the estimated overall prevalence of diabetes ranges from 12 to 14 percent, depending on the criteria used [2]. An analysis of data from the National Health Interview Survey found a doubling in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes from 1990 to 2008, with no significant change during 2008 to 2012 [3]. Other national databases, such as the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), have reported an increase in the prevalence of diabetes over two decades (from 9.8 to 12.4 percent), but have confirmed the relatively stable (approximately 12 percent) prevalence between 2008 and 2012 [2,4]. Given the marked increase in childhood obesity, there is concern that the prevalence of diabetes will continue to increase substantially. (See "Definition; epidemiology; and etiology of obesity in children and adolescents", section on 'Epidemiology'.) The prevalence of diabetes is higher in certain populations. Using data from a national survey for people aged 20 years or older, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

Type 2 diabetes is more common in people who don't do enough physical activity, and who are overweight or obese. Type 2 diabetes can often be prevented or delayed with early lifestyle changes, however there is no cure. Common symptoms include being more thirsty than usual, passing more urine, feeling tired and lethargic, slow-healing wounds, itching and skin infections and blurred vision. People with pre-diabetes can reduce their risk of developing diabetes by increasing their physical activity, eating healthily and losing weight (if they are overweight). On this page: Diabetes is a condition where there is too much glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. The body uses glucose as its main source of energy. Glucose comes from foods that contain carbohydrates, such as potatoes, bread, pasta, rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is released and absorbed into the bloodstream. The glucose in the bloodstream needs to move into body tissues so that cells can use it for energy. Excess glucose is stored in the liver, or converted to fat and stored in other body tissues. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, which is a gland located just below the stomach. Insulin opens the doors (the glucose channels) that let glucose move from the blood into the body cells. It also allows glucose to be stored in the liver and other tissues. This is part of a process known as glucose metabolism. There are two main types of diabetes – type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition where the body's immune cells attack the insulin-producing cells. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin and need insulin injections to survive. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and affects 85 to 90 per cent of all people with diabet Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition in which the body becomes resistant to the normal effects of insulin and/or gradually loses the capacity to produce enough insulin in the pancreas. We do not know what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is associated with modifiable lifestyle risk factors. Type 2 diabetes also has strong genetic and family related risk factors. Type 2 diabetes: Is diagnosed when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (reduced insulin production) and/or the insulin does not work effectively and/or the cells of the body do not respond to insulin effectively (known as insulin resistance) Represents 85–90 per cent of all cases of diabetes Usually develops in adults over the age of 45 years but is increasingly occurring in younger age groups including children, adolescents and young adults Is more likely in people with a family history of type 2 diabetes or from particular ethnic backgrounds For some the first sign may be a complication of diabetes such as a heart attack, vision problems or a foot ulcer Is managed with a combination of regular physical activity, healthy eating and weight reduction. As type 2 diabetes is often progressive, most people will need oral medications and/or insulin injections in addition to lifestyle changes over time. Type 2 diabetes develops over a long period of time (years). During this period of time insulin resistance starts, this is where the insulin is increasingly ineffective at managing the blood glucose levels. As a result of this insulin resistance, the pancreas responds by producing greater and greater amounts of insulin, to try and achieve some degree of management of the blood glucose levels. As insulin overproduction occurs over a very long period of time, the insulin producing cells in the pan Continue reading >>

8 Surprising Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

8 Surprising Risk Factors For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Understand Your Type 2 Diabetes Risk If you don't exercise, are seriously overweight, or have a host of family members with type 2 diabetes, the odds that you, too, will develop the disease become increasingly likely. But diabetes is a complicated disease, and researchers continue to discover evidence that the risk factors are more varied and complex than once thought. For example, recent research shows that breast cancer can increase the odds of developing diabetes in some women, and taking life-saving statins could protect your heart yet also be a type 2 diabetes risk factor. While these risk factors may not be as strong as being overweight or inactive, they point to the importance of taking diabetes screening and prevention seriously, especially in light of other health conditions you or family members might be facing. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes You’re at risk for developing prediabetes if you: Are overweight Are 45 years or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk) You can prevent or reverse prediabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes such as losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity. The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make healthy changes that have lasting results. Type 2 Diabetes You’re at risk for developing type 2 diabetes if you: Have prediabetes Are overweight Are 45 years or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or given birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Are African American, Hispanic/Latino American, American Indian, or Alaska Native (some Pacific Islanders and Asian Americans are also at higher risk) You can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes with simple, proven lifestyle changes such as losing weight if you’re overweight, eating healthier, and getting regular physical activity. Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are not as clear as for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Known risk factors include: Family history: Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 1 diabetes. Age: You can get type 1 diabetes at any age, but Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes is a condition that affects the body’s ability to use blood sugar for energy. The three types are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Doctors usually diagnose type 1 diabetes in childhood, although it can occur in adults also. Type 1 diabetes affects the body’s ability to produce insulin. This hormone is vital to helping the body utilize blood sugar. Without enough insulin, the extra blood sugar can damage the body. According to the American Diabetes Association, 5 percent of all people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a condition that affects a body’s ability to use insulin properly. Unlike people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes make some insulin. However, they can’t make enough to keep up with rising blood sugar levels. Doctors associate type 2 diabetes with lifestyle-related factors like obesity. Gestational diabetes is a condition that causes women to have very high blood sugar levels during pregnancy. This condition is typically temporary. Having risk factors does not mean that someone will get diabetes. Doctors don’t know the exact cause of type 1 diabetes. Family history of type 1 diabetes is considered a risk factor. According to the American Diabetes Association, the child of a man with type 1 diabetes has a 1 in 17 chance of developing type 1 diabetes. If a woman has type 1 diabetes, her child has a 1 in 25 chance if the child was born when the woman was younger than 25. Women with type 1 diabetes who give birth at age 25 or older have a 1 in 100 chance of having a child with type 1 diabetes. Having a parent with type 2 diabetes also increases diabetes risk. Because diabetes is often related to lifestyle choices, parents may pass on poor health habits to their children. This increases their risk Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Factors

Type 2 diabetes has many risk factors associated with it, mostly related to lifestyle choices. Type 2 diabetes develops when glucose—which our bodies need for energy—stays in the blood and can’t get into the cells. This occurs when the pancreas either doesn’t make enough insulin or the body doesn’t use the insulin as it should, leading to insulin resistance. About Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance means your body cannot use the insulin your body makes. Your body may produce sufficient amounts of insulin to transport glucose to the cells, but the body resists the insulin. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood and causes symptoms associated with type 2 diabetes. Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes But in order to develop insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, you must also have a genetic abnormality. Along the same lines, some people with type 2 don’t produce enough insulin; that is also due to a genetic abnormality. That is, not everyone can develop type 2 diabetes. Additionally, not everyone with a genetic abnormality will develop type 2 diabetes; these risk factors and lifestyle choices influence the development. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: Family history: Type 2 diabetes has a hereditary factor. If someone in your close family has (or had) it, you are more likely to develop it. Race/ethnicity: Certain ethnic groups are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, including African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. It’s interesting to point out that as certain countries have become more Westernized and their lifestyle choices—particularly their food choices—have become more “American,” the incidence of type 2 diabetes has gone up. For instance, China used to have a low rate of type 2 diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Risk Factors

Diabetes Risk Factors

You're also more at risk if: you’ve ever had a heart attack or a stroke you have schizophrenia, bipolar illness or depression, or if you are receiving treatment with antipsychotic medication you’re a woman who’s had polycystic ovaries, gestational diabetes, or a baby weighing over 10 pounds. You can find out your risk of Type 2 diabetes now. It only takes a few minutes. It could be the most important thing you do today. Before you use the tool to find out your risk, you need to take a few measurements: your waist size, your height and your weight. Find out more about how to get an accurate waist measurement. It's not your belt size. Are you eligible for an NHS Health Check? Whether you have any other risk factors or not, if you’re over 40 your risk of Type 2 diabetes and other conditions is higher. If you're aged 40 to 74 and living in England you may be eligible for a free NHS Health Check. It's a great way to check your health and get personalised advice on keeping yourself healthy and active. Find out more about the health check on the NHS website, or talk to your GP for more information. Terry's story Continue reading >>

​​​​type 2 Diabetes: Risk Factors

​​​​type 2 Diabetes: Risk Factors

Dr Teh Ming Ming, Senior Consultant from The Department of Endocrinology at Singapore General Hospital, a member of the SingHealth group​ shares the risk factors for​ ​type 2 diabetes.  by maintaining a healthy lifestyle.​​ What is type 2 diabetes? Type 2 diabetes is caused by the body not producing enough insulin, or the insulin is there but it is not working properly. Hence, the blood glucose level is high. What are the risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes? Researchers do not fully understand why some people develop type 2 diabetes and others do not. However, it is important to take note of some of the risk factors: The more fatty tissue you have, the more resistant your body is to the action of insulin. ​Inactivity The less active you are, the greater your risk of developing diabetes. Physical activity helps you to control your weight, uses up sugar as energy and make your cells much more sensitive to the insulin. Hence, it is important to have a healthy lifestyle to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.​​​​​​​​​ Family history Your risk increases if a parent or sibling has type 2 diabetes. High blood pressure High blood pressure of greater than 140/90 millilitres mercury (mmHg) is recognised as a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. Abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels If you have low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or good cholesterol, your risk of developing type 2 diabetes is higher. Triglyceride is another type of fat carried in the blood. People with high triglyceride level are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. You can discuss with your doctor about checking your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. ​Gestational diabetes Your risk of developing diabetes is greater if you h Continue reading >>

Risk Factors For Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational

Risk Factors For Diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, And Gestational

This article is about risk factors for diabetes mellitus. Usually just called diabetes, this is a disease that occurs when the body does not make or use insulin in the way it should. Diabetes results in a person having too much of a type of sugar, called glucose, in their blood and not enough in their cells. At least 1 in 4 people with diabetes does not know that they have the disease. Knowing risk factors for diabetes is very important for preventing the damage it can cause. If a person knows what these factors are, they can see a doctor early to find out if they have, or are at risk of, diabetes. There are three main kinds of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Each of these is briefly described below, along with their important risk factors. Type 1 diabetes In type 1 diabetes, the body makes no or very little insulin. It affects around 5 percent of those with diabetes. It is treated with either insulin injections or an insulin pump, along with diet. The main risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history. Having a parent or sibling with type 1 diabetes increases the chances of a person having the same type. If both parents have type 1, the risk is even higher. Age. Type 1 diabetes usually affects younger people. Ages 4 to 7 and ages 10 to 14 are the most common. Type 1 diabetes may occur at other ages, although it does so less often. Genetics. Having certain genes may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes. Your doctor can check for these genes. Where a person lives. Studies have found more type 1 diabetes the further away from the equator a person lives. There may be other risk factors for type 1 diabetes. Researchers are currently investigating these. Type 2 diabetes The body can still make some insulin, but is not able to use it the way it Continue reading >>

15 Common Risk Factors Of Type 2 Diabetes

15 Common Risk Factors Of Type 2 Diabetes

You're in the doctor's office for a routine physical exam when you receive the diagnosis: type 2 diabetes. Sure, you have heard of diabetes before and may even have a general idea of what led to this diagnosis. In fact, your doctor may have even warned you that in most cases, developing the disease is a direct result of poor nutrition and lack of exercise. But you didn't really listen, because you've been living this way for years and things seemed fine. How did you miss the warning signs? And what exactly went wrong? To find out, let's take a look at the most common risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes and better determine which ones may apply to you. This article was originally published by our partners at RodaleWellness.com. Both your genes and your childhood environment (learned eating habits, outdoor activities, sleeping patterns, reward mechanisms, etc.) can increase or decrease your risk of developing diabetes. The more fat you have (especially around your middle), the more resistant your body becomes to insulin and the hunger-regulating hormone leptin. Prolonged periods of sitting increase your chances of developing diabetes. Why? Working your muscles squelches the fire of inflammation. Not using your muscles leads to the development of diabetes. And when you sit, you barely use any muscles. Certain races are more prone to the ravishments of the Western diet than others: Hispanics, blacks, Hawaiians, Native Americans, and Asians have an increased risk of developing diabetes. Beginning at age 45, your risk for diabetes grows considerably. At this time in your life, you have likely eaten too many cupcakes with icing and walked too few miles (fix that now with these walking tips!)—and the effects of this lifestyle are beginning to show. And retirees have Continue reading >>

More in diabetes