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What Is The Life Expectancy Of A Man With Type 1 Diabetes

Living Longer With Diabetes: Type 1

Living Longer With Diabetes: Type 1

When you’re diagnosed with diabetes, you may wonder, “Is this going to kill me? How long can I live with this?” These are scary questions. Fortunately, the answers have gotten better. This article is about living longer with Type 1. Next week will be about Type 2. History of life with Type 1 In Type 1, the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed. Before insulin was discovered and made injectable, Type 1 diabetes usually killed children within months, or even days. The only treatment known to medicine was going on a low-carb, high-fat and -protein diet. People might live a few years that way. According to the website Defeat Diabetes, “In 1897, the average life expectancy for a 10-year-old child with diabetes was about one year. Diagnosis at age 30 carried a life expectancy of about four years. A newly diagnosed 50-year-old might live eight more years.” (Probably, those 50-year-olds really had Type 2.) In the 1920s, insulin was discovered and became available for use. Life expectancy with Type 1 went up dramatically. But when I started nursing in the 1970s, it was still common for people with Type 1 to die before age 50. With better insulins, home testing, and lower-carbohydrate diets, people live longer. A study from the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, found that people with Type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years. This compares to a life expectancy at birth of roughly 76 years for men and 81 years for women in the general population in the U.S. A new study of about 25,000 people with Type 1 in Scotland found that men with Type 1 diabetes lose about 11 years of life expectancy, and women about 13 years compared to those without the disease. According to WebMD, “Heart disease accounted for the most lost Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

Improvements In The Life Expectancy Of Type 1 Diabetes

Improvements In The Life Expectancy Of Type 1 Diabetes

Survival in type 1 diabetes has improved, but the impact on life expectancy in the U.S. type 1 diabetes population is not well established. Our objective was to estimate the life expectancy of the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) study cohort and quantify improvements by comparing two subcohorts based on year of diabetes diagnosis (1950–1964 [n = 390] vs. 1965–1980 [n = 543]). The EDC study is a prospective cohort study of 933 participants with childhood-onset (aged <17 years) type 1 diabetes diagnosed at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh from 1950 to 1980. Mortality ascertainment was censored 31 December 2009. Abridged cohort life tables were constructed to calculate life expectancy. Death occurred in 237 (60.8%) of the 1950–1964 subcohort compared with 88 (16.2%) of the 1965–1980 subcohort. The life expectancy at birth for those diagnosed 1965–1980 was ∼15 years greater than participants diagnosed 1950–1964 (68.8 [95% CI 64.7–72.8] vs. 53.4 [50.8–56.0] years, respectively) (P < 0.0001); this difference persisted regardless of sex or pubertal status at diagnosis. This improvement in life expectancy emphasizes the need for insurance companies to update analysis of the life expectancy of those with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes because weighting of insurance premiums is based on outdated estimates. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The Pittsburgh EDC study is a prospective cohort study of childhood-onset (age <17 years) type 1 diabetes. All participants were diagnosed or seen within 1 year of diagnosis at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh between 1950 and 1980. Potential participants were identified using hospital records and were considered eligible for the study if the record noted a clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. The co Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

Life Expectancy Increases For People With Type 1

An Australian study finds people with Type 1 are living longer, but not as long as the average population. A new study on life expectancy and Type 1 diabetes has brought results that can be seen as glass half-empty or glass half-full. The bad news is that life expectancy for people with Type 1 is still shorter than that of the average population; the good news is that people with Type 1 are living longer than ever before. For the study, Australian researchers used government data to measure the life expectancy of people with Type 1 from 1997 to 2010, according to a report in Diabetes in Control. By the end of the study period, men with Type 1 had gained an average of 1.9 years in life expectancy, while women with Type 1 had gained 1.5 years in the same time period. People with Type 1 still had a life expectancy that was 12 years shorter, on average, than that of the average population, however. Researchers attribute the gains in lifespan to rapid medical advances, emerging research, and deepening understanding of Type 1 diabetes. When it comes to children with Type 1, more children are being diagnosed earlier, and intensive insulin therapy is beginning at a younger age to get blood sugar levels under control. Also, insulin pump and blood sugar monitoring technology has improved greatly in the 21st century, creating the possibility for better long-term blood sugar control. With the promise of the development of new therapeutic techniques and smarter pumps, there’s hope that the gap in life expectancy between those with and without Type 1 can continue to close. Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation, our sister publication. Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Diabetes Patients And How It Can Be Improved

Life Expectancy For Diabetes Patients And How It Can Be Improved

Life Expectancy For Diabetes Patients and How it Can be Improved Diabetes, for far too long, has been characterized as a condition that shortens the life expectancy. Earlier, it was a condition that was diagnosed in people in their late forties or fifties. According to a study in 2010, diabetes cuts off an average 8.5 years from the lifespan of a 50-year-old man with diabetes as compared to the one without diabetes. Over the years, easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyle and stress, diabetes is affecting millions of young adults today. What Causes a Shorter Lifespan for Diabetes Patients? High blood sugar damages the blood vessels, nerves causing poor circulation and functioning of important organs like the heart, kidney, and eyes leading to complications such as heart attack, stroke, blindness, kidney disease if diabetes is left uncontrolled. It is accompanied by high blood pressure and cholesterol that further damages the organ systems. Short-term complications like hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis can also be fatal. The lifespan of Individuals Living with Type 1 diabetes: People with type 1 diabetes cannot produce insulin that causes the building of excess glucose in the blood. People who have been diagnosed with this condition have to be given insulin supplements to maintain the glucose levels. People with this condition are diagnosed in their youth, hence these people have to live with this condition for a relatively long period of time than people with type 2 diabetes. According to the reports of Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA); men with type 1 diabetes have a shortened lifespan of 11 years than normal men. Women with the condition have their lives cut short by 13 years. The impact on the heart health appears to be one of th Continue reading >>

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

What Is The Life Expectancy For Diabetics?

Diabetes is recognized as one of the leading causes of disability and death worldwide. There was a time when Type 2 diabetes was common in people in their late forties and fifties. However, thanks to the easy availability of processed foods, sedentary lifestyles, poor sleep and a host of other unfavorable factors, type 2 diabetes affects millions of young adults throughout the globe today. A report was commissioned in 2010 by the National Academy on an Aging Society. It showed that diabetes cut off an average of 8.5 years from the lifespan of a regular, diabetic 50-year-old as compared to a 50-year-old without the disease. This data was provided by the Health and Retirement Study, a survey of more than 20,000 Americans over the age of 50, done every two years by the University of Michigan. Characterized by high blood glucose levels, T2D can be the result of a combination of genes, obesity and an unhealthy lifestyle. If left untreated, diabetes can be life-threatening. Complications of this disease can take a serious toll on a patient’s health and well-being. So, how long do diabetics live, you ask? Does having diabetes shorten one’s life? Let’s address these questions, one by one. MORE: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) How Long Do Diabetics Live? Diabetes is a system-wide disorder which is categorized by elevated blood glucose levels. This blood travels throughout the human body and when it is laden with sugar, it damages multiple systems. When the condition is left unchecked or is managed poorly, the lifespan of diabetic patients is reduced due to constant damage. Early diagnosis and treatment of diabetes for preventing its long-term complications is the best coping strategy. So, don’t ignore your doctor’s advice if you’re pre-diabeti Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (insulin dependent diabetes, juvenile) is a condition in which the body stops making insulin. This causes the person's blood sugar to increase. There are two types of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is attacked by the immune system and then it cannot produce insulin. In type 2 diabetes the pancreas can produce insulin, but the body can't use it. Causes of type 1 diabetes are auto-immune destruction of the pancreatic beta cells. This can be caused by viruses and infections as well as other risk factors. In many cases, the cause is not known. Scientists are looking for cures for type 1 diabetes such as replacing the pancreas or some of its cells. Risk factors for type 1 diabetes are family history, introducing certain foods too soon (fruit) or too late (oats/rice) to babies, and exposure to toxins. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes are skin infections, bladder or vaginal infections, and Sometimes, there are no significant symptoms. Type 1 diabetes is diagnosed by blood tests. The level of blood sugar is measured, and then levels of insulin and antibodies can be measured to confirm type 1 vs. type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin and lifestyle changes. Specifically, meal planning to ensure carbohydrate intake matches insulin dosing. Complications of type 1 diabetes are kidney disease, eye problems, heart disease, and nerve problems (diabetic neuropathy) such as loss of feeling in the feet. Poor wound healing can also be a complication of type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes cannot be prevented, however, keeping blood sugar at healthy levels may delay or prevent symptoms or complications. There is currently no cure, and most cases of type 1 diabetes have no known cause. The prognosis or life-expectancy for a person with Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes: Where Are We In 2017?

Type 1 Diabetes: Where Are We In 2017?

Go to: Etiology T cell mediated autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells is thought to be the final pathway in the development of type 1 diabetes (5). Multiple beta cell autoantibodies are frequently present in patients with type 1 diabetes. Antigens for these antibodies include insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-65), islet antigen 2, and zinc-transporter 2 (6). The role of these antibodies in causing beta cell destruction is not completely understood. How this autoimmune process is triggered is not known, although both genetic and environmental factors are thought to be necessary. These holes in our knowledge are critical impairments in our ability to prevent type 1 diabetes. Figure 1 shows a diagram of the proposed mechanisms behind the development of type 1 diabetes. The major genetic determinants of type 1 diabetes are alleles at the HLA-DRB1 and DQB1 loci. DQA1*0501 and DQB1*0302 confer very high risk for type 1 diabetes (7). Kingery et al. have suggested a role for complement component 4 (C4) copy number variation in the development of the disease. This is interesting since the C4 gene is closely associated to the HLA locus (8). Polymorphisms in multiple other genes including the insulin gene have also been found to play a role, although their relative contribution is small (9). The exact environmental factors involved in type 1 diabetes initiation are far less known. One plausible hypothesis is that viral infections trigger beta cell autoimmunity in genetically susceptible individuals. Several viruses have been associated with type 1 diabetes, including enteroviruses such as coxsackievirus B (10). Enterovirus infections are more frequent in siblings who develop type 1 diabetes compared with siblings without diabetes (11). Enterovirus antibodies are Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes May Cut Life Span, But Intensive Treatment Can Help Close The Gap

Type 1 Diabetes May Cut Life Span, But Intensive Treatment Can Help Close The Gap

People with type 1 diabetes may have a shorter life expectancy than their peers, but intensive treatment may help offset that risk, say two separate new studies. In the first study, published in JAMA, Shona J. Livingstone of the University of Dundee in Scotland and her colleagues compared the life expectancy of Scottish men and women ages 20 and older who had type 1 diabetes to a group of adults without the condition. Life expectancy after age 20 was an additional 46.2 years among men with type 1 diabetes, but 57.3 years among men without the condition, an estimated loss of 11.1 years. Find the Best Diabetes Blogs of the Year » The life expectancy after age 20 for women with type 1 diabetes was an additional 48.1 years, compared to 61 years among women without it, an estimated loss of 12.9 years for women with diabetes. In the general population without type 1 diabetes, 76 percent of men and 83 percent of women lived to age 70, compared with 47 percent of men and 55 percent of women with type 1 diabetes. The study also showed that even patients with type 1 diabetes who still had good kidney function had reduced life expectancy. Heart Disease, Diabetic Comas Are Common Causes of Death Dr. Helen Colhoun, a professor of public health at the University of Dundee and a co-author of the study, told Healthline that heart disease, heart attacks, and diabetic comas were responsible for the largest percentage of the estimated loss in life expectancy for patients younger than 50. Colhoun said, “The data are good news for people with type 1 diabetes. They show much better average life expectancy than older reports from other countries. At the same time, they also show that further work needs to be done to get to a goal of no reduction in life span. These data emphasize that effo Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy Gap Between Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And General Population Persists

Life Expectancy Gap Between Patients With Type 1 Diabetes And General Population Persists

Life Expectancy Gap Between Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and General Population Persists Life Expectancy Gap Between Patients With Type 1 Diabetes and General Population Persists Patients with type 1 diabetes are more likely to die earlier and live more years with disabilities. Although life expectancy has increased among patients with type 1 diabetes and the general population, those with the disease are still likely to live more years with disabilities and die earlier than people without diabetes.1,2,3,4 According to a study published in JAMA in 2015, the estimated loss of life expectancy in patients with type 1 diabetes at 20 years of age was approximately 11 years for men and 13 years for women, as compared with the general population without the disease.1 The findings were based on data from patients in Scotland from 2008 to 2010. Nevertheless, the researchers noted that their findings may not hold true for other nations or populations. An important question is whether our findings are generalizable internationally. This cannot be directly assessed because there are no large contemporary or historical nationally representative studies from other countries, Shana Livingston, MSc, of the University of Dundee in Scotland, and colleagues wrote, noting that contemporary larger scale data from other countries are needed. However, 2 recent studies published in Diabetologia, which examined life expectancy of patients with type 1 diabetes in Australia and Sweden, may offer a few answers to this question. In the first study, Lili Huo, MD, and Dianna Magliano, PhD, both from Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia, derived mortality rates of Australians with type 1 diabetes listed on the National Diabetes Services Scheme between 1997 and 2010 (n=85 54 Continue reading >>

Why Do Some Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Live So Long?

Why Do Some Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Live So Long?

Go to: Abstract While the lifespan of people with type 1 diabetes has increased progressively since the advent of insulin therapy, these patients still experience premature mortality, primarily from cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, a subgroup of those with type 1 diabetes survives well into old age without significant morbidity. It is the purpose of this review to explore the factors which may help in identifying these patients. It might be expected that hyperglycaemia plays a major role in explaining the increased incidence of CVD and mortality of these individuals. However, while a number of publications have associated poor long term glycaemic control with an increase in both all-cause mortality and CVD in those with type 1 diabetes, it is apparent that good glycaemic control alone cannot explain why some patients with type 1 diabetes avoid fatal CVD events. Lipid disorders may occur in those with type 1 diabetes, but the occurrence of elevated high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol is positively associated with longevity in this population. Non-renal hypertension, by itself is a significant risk factor for CVD but if adequately treated does not appear to mitigate against longevity. However, the presence of nephropathy is a major risk factor and its absence after 15-20 years of diabetes appears to be a marker of long-term survival. One of the major factors linked with long-term survival is the absence of features of the metabolic syndrome and more specifically the presence of insulin sensitivity. Genetic factors also play a role, with a family history of longevity and an absence of type 2 diabetes and hypertension in the family being important considerations. There is thus a complex interaction between multiple risk factors in determining which patients with type Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes

New study shows recent improvement in years of life lost. With minimal studies to evaluate the impact of type 1 diabetes on life expectancy, studies have been developed to retrospectively look at the effects of diabetes on mortality. Diabetes was also compared to other disease states and causes that had an influence on years of life lost (YLL). The YLL of patients with type 1 diabetes and patients with other disease states were compared to those of the general healthy population. This autoimmune disorder accounts for 10% of all Americans diagnosed with diabetes, and the ability to prevent the development of type 1 diabetes is minimal. Causes have been linked to genetics, and viral infections such as mumps, rubella, cytomegalovirus, measles, influenza, encephalitis, polio, or Epstein-Barr virus. In a study conducted on Australians with type 1 diabetes between the years of 1997 and 2010, researchers looked at the estimated YLL of the type 1 diabetic patients compared to the general public. Researchers used the Chiang method to estimate life expectancy and Arriaga’s method to estimate the impact of age-specific and cause-specific mortalities. Results showed no disparity in terms of YLL from type 1 diabetes in women vs. men. When the YLL was organized into two groups, 1997-2003 and 2004-2010, the 2004-2010 groups showed improvement in life expectancies of 1.9 years in men and 1.5 years in women. Overall, over the time period of the study, patients with type 1 diabetes had a life expectancy of 12.2 years less than the general population. The majority of the YLL was attributed to endocrine and metabolic diseases that occurred between the ages of 10-39, and circulatory diseases that occurred after the age of 40. Medical advances over the years may account for the YLL improve Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes And Life Expectancy: What Effect Does Type 2 Diabetes Have?

Diabetes can cause serious health complications and have an impact on life expectancy. How much a person's life is reduced depends on a combination of factors, such as the severity of the case, additional complications, and response to treatment. After being diagnosed, most people with diabetes want to know how the condition will affect the length and quality of their life. Each individual varies, but maintaining healthy blood sugar levels often has the largest influence on life expectancy. Relatively few studies have examined the link between diabetes and life expectancy, especially on a large scale. As a result, doctors aren't entirely sure how diabetes relates to how long people with the condition will live. This article will explore more. Fast facts on diabetes and life expectancy: While some estimates exist, there is no way to know exactly how diabetes will affect life expectancy. Type 2 diabetes is thought to have less of an effect on life expectancy than type 1 because people typically develop the condition much later in life. Generally, anything that helps maintain or contribute to healthy blood sugar levels can reduce the toll diabetes takes. What is the life expectancy of people with type 2 diabetes? A 2010 report by Diabetes UK claims type 2 diabetes reduces life expectancy by roughly 10 years. The same report states that type 1 diabetes may reduce life expectancy by at least 20 years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the average life expectancy in 2014 for American men was 76.4 years and women 81.2 years. A 2012 Canadian study found that women aged 55 years and over with diabetes lost on average 6 years of life while men lost 5 years. Also, a 2015 study concluded that the risk of death associated with type 2 diabetes could b Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy 'not Reduced' By Intensive Type 1 Diabetes Treatment

Life Expectancy 'not Reduced' By Intensive Type 1 Diabetes Treatment

Although the recommended standard of care, it has yet to be established whether intensive diabetes therapy affects mortality in type 1 diabetes patients. A new study, however, has found an association between intensive treatment and a modestly lower all-cause rate of death. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, PA, followed type 1 diabetes patients for an average of 27 years. Among these patients, receiving intensive treatment with the aim of reducing blood sugar levels to a nondiabetic range was linked to a slight reduction in mortality compared with conventional treatment. While the effect of intensive diabetes therapy on the mortality of people with type 1 diabetes had not been established, previous research has found that the reduction of blood sugar toward the nondiabetic range in type 2 diabetes patients does not consistently lead to a reduction in mortality. Type 1 diabetes is a condition whereby the body does not produce the insulin required to convert sugars, starches and other foods into energy. With type 2 diabetes, the body does not utilize the insulin that is produced properly - also referred to as insulin resistance. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 29.1 million Americans - around 9.3% of the population - had diabetes in 2012. This figure had increased from 25.8 million (8.3%) in 2010. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the US. Other research suggests that type 1 diabetes patients may have shorter life expectancies than the general population. A recent Scottish population study, published in JAMA, reports that men with type 1 diabetes have an average life expectancy 11 years lower than the general public. Women with type 1 diabetes at the same age have a life expectancy 13 years lower than the general average. Inten Continue reading >>

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes May Be Improving

Life Expectancy For Type 1 Diabetes May Be Improving

(Reuters Health) - On average, people with type 1 diabetes die 11 to 13 years earlier than people without the condition, according to a new study from Scotland. While the news may be disheartening for people with type 1 diabetes, the study’s senior researcher said the new results are more encouraging than previous estimates that found larger gaps in life expectancies. An important message is that the difference in life expectancy is narrowing, said Dr. Helen Colhoun of the University of Dundee School of Medicine in Scotland. “It’s not zero,” she said. “The goal is to get it to zero.” Among people with type 1 diabetes, formerly known as juvenile diabetes, the body’s immune system destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Insulin removes sugar from the bloodstream so it can be used for energy. Instead, those people need to inject insulin and pay special attention to their blood sugar – or glucose – levels. Untreated, type 1 diabetes can lead to heart, blood vessel, kidney, eye, and nerve damage. About 29.1 million Americans have diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 5 percent of those have type 1 diabetes. The researchers write in JAMA that according to earlier data from the U.K., people there with type 1 diabetes died an average of 15 to 20 years earlier than nondiabetics. A 1970s report put the decrease in life expectancy at 27 years for type 1 diabetics in the U.S., and a 1980s report from New Zealand put it at 16.5 years. “They’re mostly very old,” Colhoun said of the estimates. She said the correct information is important, because it shows how far care for type 1 diabetes has come. For the new study, the researchers used national data from Scotland on 24,691 people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

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