diabetestalk.net

What Is The Latest Medicine For Diabetes?

Fda Approves Drug That Helps Diabetes, Weight Loss

Fda Approves Drug That Helps Diabetes, Weight Loss

FDA Approves Drug That Helps Diabetes, Weight Loss A new diabetes drug that lowers blood sugar and also helps people lose weight has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The once-a-week injection drug Ozempic ( semaglutide ) is approved for people with type 2 diabetes . It stimulates the body's insulin production and reduces appetite, the Associated Press reported. The drug is from Danish company Novo Nordisk. A company-funded study of 1,200 type 2 diabetes patients found those who took Ozempic had average reductions in long-term blood sugar levels at least 2.5 times greater than those who took the daily diabetes pill Januvia. Patients who took Ozempic also lost two to three times as much weight as those in the comparison group, the AP reported. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. Substantial weight loss can help lower their blood sugar and better control their diabetes. Novo Nordisk is also assessing Ozempic separately for weight loss alone. Ozempic costs $676 for a four- to six-week supply without insurance. Novo Nordisk also markets a similar once-a-day shot, Victoza, the AP reported. Copyright 2013-2017 HealthDay. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes Treatment

Treatment of type 2 diabetes includes both self-care by the patient and medical care provided by physicians and other healthcare providers. Diabetes treatment generally includes: Medications Nutrition therapy Physical activity Lifestyle measures to manage stress and other issues Specialist care to prevent and treat complications Bariatric surgery Type 2 Diabetes Medications Many people with type 2 diabetes start with the oral drug metformin to help control blood sugar levels, and then add other drugs to the regimen, either soon after diagnosis or months or years later. There are currently more than 10 classes of diabetes drugs, each of which lowers blood sugar in a different way. If your current drug regimen isn't lowering blood sugar enough, your doctor may elect to add a drug from a different class. Most people with type 2 diabetes will also eventually need to use insulin. Some will need to take one or two doses of long-acting insulin per day, such as Lantus (insulin glargine) or Levemir (insulin detemir), and others will need to take long-acting insulin with rapid-acting insulin, such as Humalog (insulin lispro) or Novolog (insulin aspart) before meals. Sulfonylureas and Meglitinides Sulfonylurea medications have also been used for many years to help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar. These drugs "cause the insulin-producing [cells of the pancreas] to produce insulin almost constantly, which means they [increase the] risk for low blood sugar and for weight gain," says Daniel Einhorn, MD, vice president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. "But, they are inexpensive and they are effective, and have been used for a long time," he adds. Examples of sulfonylureas include: Another group of medications that stimulate insulin-produci Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Diabetes Medication - Guides And Information

Tweet Diabetes medications are a common form of treatment for people with diabetes. There are many different types of diabetes medicines, or anti-diabetic drugs, and this includes insulin, which has its own area within the site. Whilst each drug is unique in the way it works to help patients with diabetes keep their condition under control, some act similarly to one other and are grouped in the same class of drugs. The way in which they are administered can also differ, with some medicines taken orally and others injected directly into the blood. Are diabetes drugs suitable for all diabetics? Most diabetes drugs are designed for people with type 2 diabetes who are unable to control their blood sugar levels through strict diet and exercise alone. But some, such as metformin, are sometimes taken alongside insulin treatment for people with type 1 diabetes. Medication guides Explore the 18 most common medications for diabetes: Assists insulin in controlling post-meal glucose levels. Can more than one drug be taken at the same time? Depending on individual circumstances, a GP may prescribe more than one anti-diabetic drug to help treat a patient’s diabetes. Watch the video below for more information on the types of diabetes medication available. What are the side effects of anti-diabetic medicines? As with any type of medication, blood glucose-lowering drugs can have a number of side effects. These potentially harmful effects are listed in the patient information leaflet that accompanies the medication, so make sure you check this before starting your drug treatment. You may not experience any of the adverse effects listed, but if you do, consult your doctor and/or diabetes care team as they may be able to suggest another suitable medication for your condition. They will a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

New Type 2 Diabetes Medications

New Type 2 Diabetes Medications

Even if you can manage your diabetes now by just eating well and being active, you may need medication someday. We've come far since the 1920s, when insulin was first used to treat diabetes. There's no magic pill yet, but you have more options than ever before to help control your blood sugar. And more are coming. Most type 2 diabetes drugs work by helping your body make insulin or use it better. Some new medicines are different because they don't have anything to do with insulin. Your kidneys try to keep glucose, a kind of sugar your cells use for energy, out of your pee. Proteins called sodium-glucose transporters (SGLTs) help your kidneys keep glucose in your blood instead of your pee. But with type 2 diabetes, if your blood sugar level is already creeping up, you don't need the glucose in your body. Pills known as SGLT2 inhibitors turn off one of those proteins so that you pee it out instead. Canagliflozin (Invokana) Dapagliflozin (Farxiga) Empagliflozin (Jardiance) These drugs have some extra benefits, says John B. Buse, MD, PhD, director of the Diabetes Care Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. "You're losing calories through urine, so there is weight loss -- usually about 5 to 10 pounds in 6 to 12 months." When you take them, you lose a little bit of salt, too, which can help with your blood pressure. These drugs aren't perfect, he says. "The downside is that, because there is sugar in your nether regions, women have a higher risk of yeast infections, and uncircumcised men can get foreskin infections." To avoid the risk of dehydration, Buse says that elderly people with kidney disease and people who are taking diuretics, pills that make you pee out extra water, shouldn't take SGLT2 inhibitors. Another downside in taking SGLT2 inhibitors is t Continue reading >>

The Latest In Diabetes Drugs: Less Hypoglycemia, More Weight Loss

The Latest In Diabetes Drugs: Less Hypoglycemia, More Weight Loss

By Emma Ryan and Payal Marathe Research presented at EASD 2017 showcased drugs, both new and old, that improve blood sugar management, weight loss, heart health, and even blood pressure New research presented at the recent European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) conference showed promising results, including lower A1c, better heart health, weight loss, and less hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Click to read more about the most notable updates on new therapies: Semaglutide – a once-weekly GLP-1 injection for type 2 diabetes (under FDA review after a very positive Advisory Committee meeting in which four diaTribe Foundation volunteers participated) Bydureon – a once-weekly GLP-1 injection for type 2 diabetes (available now, with a newly-approved, easier way to take it) Add-on pills for type 1 – SGLT “class” Farxiga (available now) and sotagliflozin (in development) Tresiba – a once-daily basal insulin for type 1 and type 2 (available now) Sulfonylureas versus pioglitazone – type 2 diabetes pills (available now) Glimepiride versus ertugliflozin – type 2 diabetes pills (available now and in development, respectively) The EASD meeting also included discussions of much more than diabetes drug therapies. You can read diaTribe’s coverage of a study showing improved outcomes from CGM use during pregnancy and The diaTribe Foundation’s event on “Solvable Problems in Diabetes.” Semaglutide– a once-weekly injection for type 2 diabetes (under FDA review) Researchers presented new weight loss data on semaglutide, a once-weekly GLP-1 agonist that is currently under FDA review. The SUSTAIN 6 trial showed that people with type 2 diabetes on the lower dose of semaglutide lost more weight – an average of 8 pounds (4% of their body weight) – compar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medicines

Diabetes Medicines

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. If you can't control your diabetes with wise food choices and physical activity, you may need diabetes medicines. The kind of medicine you take depends on your type of diabetes, your schedule, and your other health conditions. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. If you have type 1 diabetes, you will need to take insulin. Type 2 diabetes, the most common type, can start when the body doesn't use insulin as it should. If your body can't keep up with the need for insulin, you may need to take pills. Along with meal planning and physical activity, diabetes pills help people with type 2 diabetes or gestational diabetes keep their blood glucose levels on target. Several kinds of pills are available. Each works in a different way. Many people take two or three kinds of pills. Some people take combination pills. Combination pills contain two kinds of diabetes medicine in one tablet. Some people take pills and insulin. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Breaking Down Diabetes: Drugs For Diabetes, Starting With The Best Metformin

Breaking Down Diabetes: Drugs For Diabetes, Starting With The Best Metformin

Stanford University School of Medicine blog Breaking down diabetes: Drugs for diabetes, starting with the best metformin Metformin is physician-researcher Randall Stafford's go-to drug for diabetes. He explains why in this installment in the series, Breaking down diabetes. A huge assortment of 100 medications are available to treat high blood sugar in Type 2 diabetes, including two historical breakthrough drugs, insulin and metformin . The pharmaceutical industry has successfully added a few new, innovative drugs, but the most effective drugs remain the older, less expensive medications. Let's make some sense out of this mess of medications. Most are given by mouth (oral), but injected insulin, which I'll address in a future blog post, remains a key medication. In addition, oral drugs have limited impact, so they are often used in combinations (including tablets containing two drugs). Patients frequently try multiple oral drugs before starting insulin. With very few exceptions, I start patients on metformin first. To illustrate a patient's experience with diabetes drugs, let's check in on with Mrs. R., a 70-year-old with diabetes: When she was first diagnosed 19 years ago, she started on metformin at 500 mg twice per day. These large tablets initially caused intestinal discomfort (a common side effect). Over time, the mild abdominal pain went away. This drug worked well for a few years, but Mrs. R gained some additional weight and the metformin was no longer adequate. The drug, glipizide was added. This also worked for many years, but in 2012, she needed a third drug, sitagliptin . Eventually, she would need insulin. To understand Mrs. R's experience, or the medications taken by you or a friend or family member, lets start with the best medication, metformin. Approved Continue reading >>

New And Improved Diabetes Medications

New And Improved Diabetes Medications

Pharmacy shelves and the approval pipeline are packed with new medications for all types of diabetes, according to our experts. "Efforts to develop and approve blood glucose-lowering medicines for type 2 diabetes are at an unprecedented high," says Kelly L. Close, PWD type 1, president of Close Concerns, Inc., a health care information company, and editor-in-chief of e-newsletter diaTribe (diatribe.us). "No surprise -- so are the numbers of people with type 2 and the need for new therapies." The need, the numbers, and the understanding that type 2 is more than just a glucose and insulin problem have revved the drug-development engines, with some likely benefits for type 1 diabetes, too. "We now know that six or more organs are involved in glucose control, including the pancreas, liver, gastrointestinal tract, muscle, adipose tissue (fat), and brain," says Susan Cornell, Pharm.D., CDE, assistant professor of pharmacy practice at Midwestern University Chicago College of Pharmacy in Downers Grove, Illinois. Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Drug For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

Fda Approves New Drug For Treatment Of Type 2 Diabetes

The US Food and Drug and Administration has announced the approval of a drug called Farxiga (dapaglifozin) to help treat adults with type 2 diabetes. The tablets, in combination with diet and exercise, are said to improve control of blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, approximately 25.8 million people in the US have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes accounts for around 90% of these cases. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high blood glucose (hyperglycemia). This is a result of the body being unable to produce enough insulin, or not being able to use the insulin properly (insulin resistance). High blood sugar levels can lead to serious short-term and long-term health issues, such as nerve and kidney damage, blindness and heart disease. Farxiga, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor (SGLT2), works by preventing the kidney from reabsorbing glucose. This increases the excretion of glucose and reduces blood sugar levels. According to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), 16 clinical trials involving more than 9,400 patients with type 2 diabetes assessed the safety and effectiveness of the drug. These trials demonstrated that Farxiga was able to improve HbA1c (hemoglobin A1c or glycosylated hemoglobin) levels - a measure of blood glucose control - in type 2 diabetic patients. Commenting on the drug approval, Dr. Curtis Rosebraugh, director of the Office of Drug Evaluation II at the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, says: Controlling blood sugar levels is very important in the overall treatment and care of diabetes, and Farxiga provides an additional treatment option for millions of Americans with type 2 diabetes." The FDA says as well as being assessed as a stand-alone therapy, the drug has also been tested in combination with Continue reading >>

Diabetes Wonder Drug: New Pill Can 'significantly' Improve Health Of Type 2 Sufferers

Diabetes Wonder Drug: New Pill Can 'significantly' Improve Health Of Type 2 Sufferers

British researchers have shown a simple pill has the power to lower blood sugar and promote weight loss in just three months. The development is significant as the once a day tablet could potentially end the need for painful daily insulin injections. And it comes as figures show the diabetes epidemic gripping the UK costs the NHS more than £10 billion a year with a new diagnosis made every two minutes. Trials showed up to 90 per cent of patients receiving semaglutide lowered their blood glucose levels and experienced “meaningful” weight loss. Study leader Melanie Davies, Professor of Diabetes Medicine at the University of Leicester, said: “These results demonstrating semaglutide’s ability to have a significant impact on lowering blood glucose and support weight loss when taken orally therefore are hugely promising. “Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition with potentially devastating complications which is posing a major challenge to health services across the world because of the increasing numbers of people developing it.” Although there are several treatments for Type 2 currently available many come with an increased risk of developing low blood sugar, a condition known as hypoglycaemia, and weight gain. The pill could be available in as little as two years. Type 2 diabetics either do not produce enough insulin, which controls blood sugar levels, or the insulin they produce does not work properly. The condition is largely lifestyle driven with nine in 10 sufferers overweight or obese. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Meanwhile, about 12 million people in the UK are at increased risk of Continue reading >>

Top 6 Breakthrough Diabetes Treatments You May Have Missed

Top 6 Breakthrough Diabetes Treatments You May Have Missed

Are you concerned you might be diagnosed with diabetes one day? You are not alone. Diabetes and prediabetes are two of the top pressing health issues in the nation. The number of Americans who are at risk for diabetes is astounding: it is reported that close to 86 million people in the U.S. have prediabetes, meaning their blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates a person diagnosed at age 50 dies six years earlier than a person without diabetes. One in three American adults will have diabetes in the year 2050 if current trends continue. Close to 29 million Americans, or 9% of the population, currently have diabetes. The vast majority of people, about 90 to 95 percent of those diagnosed with diabetes, have type 2 diabetes, according to the ADA. Insulin is a hormone the body needs to utilize the glucose (sugar) from food to provide energy for the body. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas either doesn't make enough insulin, there is resistance to the effects of insulin, or both. Treatment typically begins with oral metformin, a veteran drug that is the backbone of many diabetes treatment regimens. From there, different drug classes may be added to metformin, and for some patients, the use of insulin may become necessary. However, the latest diabetes news is encouraging. New drugs, improved monitoring devices and an understanding of how diet and exercise can impact diabetes is adding up to positive outcomes for patients. As reported in August 2014 from research in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, the vast majority of people with type 2 diabetes are living longer lives due to better medications and treatments for both the disease and the numerous complications that Continue reading >>

The Top Diabetes Treatment Options For Better Blood Sugar Control

The Top Diabetes Treatment Options For Better Blood Sugar Control

There are some health conditions that can be managed by simply taking a pill — but type 2 diabetes isn’t one of them. Diabetes is a complex condition that often requires lifestyle changes and sometimes additional treatment that can help keep your blood sugar level under control. For some people, making healthful lifestyle changes can be enough to gain control over their blood sugar level. For others, taking medication may also be necessary. There are many drug options available, and the initial approach might need to be tweaked as treatment progresses. How Type 2 Diabetes Can Be Treated Through Diet and Lifestyle Changes The first approach to managing diabetes usually means practicing healthier lifestyle habits. This is often centered on eating a better diet, getting exercise, and losing weight if necessary. If your doctor says that you need to make these changes, it’s smart to tailor them to your personal preferences so that you'll be more likely to stick with them. “First, I ask people about their exercise patterns and about what they like to eat, and try to get an idea about what might be improved,” says endocrinologist William Sivitz, MD, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. Dr. Sivitz emphasizes the importance of being active, eating a healthy diet, and having a good understanding of the role that carbohydrates play. He recommends eating healthy carbs, such as nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, legumes, whole grains, and nonfat dairy products. A certified diabetes educator or a registered dietitian can help personalize your diet and teach you strategies to control your blood sugar. Depending on your desired blood sugar range and weight loss goals, recommendations for foods, carbohydrate intake, an Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Diabetes Drug That Also Helps With Weight Loss

Fda Approves Diabetes Drug That Also Helps With Weight Loss

FDA approves diabetes drug that also helps with weight loss FDA approves diabetes drug that also helps with weight loss TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators on Tuesday approved a new diabetes drug that reduces blood sugar levels and also helps people lose significant weight. Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk said the Food and Drug Administration approved its once-a-week shot for people with Type 2 diabetes. The drug, Ozempic, also known as semaglutide, works by stimulating the body's own insulin production and reducing appetite. In one big company-funded study, Ozempic, on average, reduced long-term blood sugar levels at least 2 ½ times as much as a popular daily diabetes pill, Merck & Co.'s Januvia. It also helped study participants lose two to three times as much weight as those in the comparison group. Over 56 weeks, patients who got a lower dose of Ozempic lost an average of 9.5 pounds (4.3 kilograms) while those who got a higher dose lost 13.5 pounds (6.1 kilograms). The patients who took Januvia lost an average of 4 pounds (1.9 kilograms). The 1,200 study participants were also taking one or two standard diabetes medicines. Novo Nordisk, a leader in diabetes care, has also been testing the drug separately for weight loss alone. Many Type 2 diabetes patients are overweight or obese, and losing significant weight usually helps them reduce their blood sugar and better control their diabetes. Over time, too high sugar in the blood can damage multiple organs and weaken circulation. The new drug comes in injector pens and costs about the same as similar weekly drugs: $676 for a four- to six-week supply without insurance. Novo Nordisk already sells a similar once-a-day shot, Victoza. Ozempic will compete with other popular once-a-week drugs in the same class, including E Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Lancing Devices And Diabetes Drugs

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016. When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner. In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In this installment, we look at lancing devices and diabetes drugs that have recently hit the market. Lancing devices Motivated to help a friend with Type 2 diabetes, bioengineer Christopher Jacobs, PhD, developed a new lancing device, called Genteel, to reduce the pain of pricking fingertips. “I was moved by his distress, compelled by our friendship, and undone by the irresistible siren song that lies at the heart of every engineering challenge,” said Jacobs. For 10 years, Jacobs studied the limitations of current devices and the Continue reading >>

More in diabetes