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What Is The Difference Between Type One Diabetes And Type Two Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Overview Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose), your body's important source of fuel. With type 2 diabetes, your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or doesn't produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. Symptoms Signs and symptoms of type 2 diabetes often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for: Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty. As a result, you may drink — and urinate — more than usual. Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat. Calories are lost as excess glucose is released in the urine. Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable. Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus. Slow-healing sores o Continue reading >>

Case Study: New-onset Diabetes: How To Tell The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Case Study: New-onset Diabetes: How To Tell The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

L.C., a 25-year-old white woman, presented to the Emergency Department reporting that she was in good health until ~ 3 weeks ago, when she began experiencing polyuria and polydipsia. She had had an unintentional weight loss of ~ 10 lb in the past 2 months. She denied visual disturbances, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dysuria, history of the same symptoms, and recent illness. She also denied alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drug use. Her medications included only oral birth control pills, and she was a competitive volleyball player. Family history was negative for diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, and autoimmune diseases. Physical exam revealed a blood pressure of 129/82 mmHg, pulse of 88 bpm, and respiration rate of 20 breaths per minute. L.C.'s weight was 62 kg, and her BMI was 21 kg/m2. She seemed healthy and aware. Her eyes, throat, and thyroid were normal, and her neck was negative for lymphadenopathy. She had a regular heart rate and rhythm, negative for murmurs, rubs, or gallops, with normal first and second heart sounds. Lungs were clear with normal respirations. Abdominal exam revealed normal breath sounds and no tenderness, guarding, or rebound. Extremities were normal, and neurological motor and sensory functioning was intact. Her fingerstick glucose on admission was 571 mg/dl, and subsequently measured serum glucose was 617 mg/dl. Testing revealed a sodium level of 133 mEq/l (normal 135–145), potassium of 4.0 mEq/l (normal 3.5–5.0), chloride of 99 mEq/l (normal 96–108), carbon dioxide of 25 mEq/l (normal 21–30), blood urea nitrogen (BUN) of 18 mg/dl (normal 7.0–20.0), and creatinine of 0.8 mg/dl (normal 0.4–10). Serum acetone was positive at 1:2. Urinalysis revealed a specific gravity of 1.010 (normal 1.005–1.300), glucose of 3+, Continue reading >>

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is More Worse Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes is a complicated condition and is mainly categorized into two different types: Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are a lot of differences as well as similarities between the two-condition due to which people often argue as to which type of diabetes is worse than the other. The following article deals with this question as we try to understand the differences and similarities between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. So, read on “Which is More Worse Type 1 or Type 2 Diabetes?” Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Let us first start by understanding the differences between the two types of diabetes. Following are the major differences: Definition Type 1 is the type of diabetes that is caused when the beta cells of the pancreas responsible for the production of the hormone insulin are destroyed completely. Thus, the body lacks insulin. Type 2 is the condition where the pancreas of the body is able to produce the hormone. However, the body is unable to utilize the hormone appropriately for several reasons. Causes The main causes of type 1 are genetic disorders, exposure to varied types of viral infections such as mumps and other viruses, exposure to the toxins in the environment, amongst others. Insulin resistance is the most important cause of type 2 diabetes. The condition is also associated with the increase in the body weight of the individual as well as with high levels of blood pressure and bad cholesterol levels. Genes can also be a factor here too. Onset The onset in case of type 1 is often very rapid, while the onset of type 2 is often really slow. The type 1 is mostly diagnosed during the childhood while type 2 is said to be diagnosed in adults who are usually over 30 years of age. Symptoms In either type of diabetes, the symptoms are slow to appea Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, a national health initiative to help the general public better understand what diabetes is, what its symptoms are, and how they can better manage and even prevent symptoms. One of the most common questions that people ask about diabetes is, “What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes?” Take a look at some of the key differences between each type, as well as some tips for treatment and management. Type 1 vs. Type 2 Diabetes There are two primary differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The first is that type 1 diabetes most frequently begins in childhood, which is why it is medically referred to as “juvenile-onset diabetes.” This type of diabetes is much more rare than type 2, with only about 5 percent of diabetes cases being type 1. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, can occur at any age but generally develops as an adult and is therefore called “adult-onset diabetes.” The second major difference between the two types lies in the way each affects the body. People with type 1 diabetes are unable to produce insulin, the hormone needed to regulate blood sugar levels and that allows your body to use glucose, or sugar, to create energy. People with type 2 diabetes have what is known as “insulin resistance,” meaning that while their bodies can produce insulin, they are unable to use it properly. Although there is no known cure for either type of diabetes, there are some effective strategies that you can use to help better manage the condition and to even reverse some of its effects. Most notably, it is crucial that those with diabetes take steps to eat a healthy, balanced diet, get regular exercise, and reduce stress. It’s also important that you work closely with your healthcare professio Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key. People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key. Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications. Both types of diabetes, if not controlled, share many similar symptoms, including: frequent urination feeling very thirsty and drinking a lot feeling very hungry feeling very fatigued blurry vision cuts or sores that don’t heal properly People with type 1 diabetes may also experience irritability and mood changes, and unintentionally lose weight. People with type 2 diabetes may also have numbness and tingling in their hands or feet. Although many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar, they present in very different ways. Many people with type 2 diabetes won’t have symptoms for many years. Then often the symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop slowly over the course of time. Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all and don’t discover their condition until complications develop. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop fast, typically over the course of several weeks. Type 1 diabetes, which was once known as juvenile diabetes, usually develops in childhood or adolescence. But it’s possible to get type 1 diabetes later in life. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have simi Continue reading >>

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What’s The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Find out the difference here. By Lester Wong Photo: udra / www.123rf.com PEOPLE AT RISK Type 1 diabetes most commonly presents in childhood and young adulthood. A family history puts a person at a slightly higher risk. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur in older people, above 40 years of age, especially those who are obese. TYPE 2 DIABETES MORE COMMON THAN TYPE 1 Over 90 per cent of the 400,000 diabetes cases here are Type 2, according to the 2010 national health survey. TYPE 2 DIABETES CAN BE PREVENTED, BUT NOT TYPE 1 Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Life-long insulin replacement is needed. Type 2 diabetes is associated with weight gain or obesity, leading to resistance to insulin. Long-term insulin replacement is needed only in more severe cases. “Maintaining a healthy weight through healthy eating and regular physical activity can help prevent Type 2 diabetes,” said Dr Daphne Gardner, a consultant at the Singapore General Hospital’s department of endocrinology. ONSET OF SYMPTOMS Both types of diabetes are marked by high glucose levels in the blood. Symptoms include thirst and frequent urination, weight loss, fatigue and recurrent infections. Symptoms for Type 2 diabetes may not show up until the glucose levels are very high. The onset of symptoms for Type 1 diabetes can be abrupt, sometimes happening over a matter of weeks. A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 15, 2016, with the headline ‘Differences between Type 1 and 2 diabetes‘. Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Type One And Type Two Diabetes

The Difference Between Type One And Type Two Diabetes

The Difference Between Type One and Type Two Diabetes Max Heinegg September 20, 2017 Comments Off on The Difference Between Type One and Type Two Diabetes Most people can associate the word diabetes with one person they know, but do they really know the difference between type one and type two diabetes and how it affects the people that have been diagnosed with it? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease associated with abnormally high levels of the sugar glucose in the blood. The two different types of diabetes are called similar names because the both involve the pancreas and insulin. The pancreas produces insulin which is a hormone that lowers blood sugar levels. Type one diabetes makesup 10% of the peoplewho have diabetes. Type one diabetes is caused by ones immune system destroying the cells that make insulin which eventually leaves the body unable to produce insulin. Without insulin, the bodys cells can no longer absorb the glucose needed to make energy. This is a genetic disease. There is no cure for type one diabetes, but the treatments can range anywhere from insulin injections to an insulin pump. a Medtronic insulin pump with infusion set Type one diabetics are dependent on insulin and can not live without it. Their blood sugars can fluctuate from low numbers to high numbers. The desired blood sugar for most human is between 80 to 100 mg/dL. Person checking glucose levels using glucose meter. Type two diabetics, who are normally associated with being overweight, are not insulin dependent but rather insulin resistant. They do not experience low blood sugars, but they do experience high blood sugars. This occurs when the body does not receive enough insulin to convert the glucose into energy, so it stays in the blood and can be realized when the blood is tested. Continue reading >>

Chart: The Basic Differences Between Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes

Chart: The Basic Differences Between Type 1 & Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases in children and adolescents — in fact, more than 150,000 people below age 20 have diabetes. When diabetes strikes during childhood, it is routinely assumed to be type 1, or juvenile-onset diabetes. However, in the last 2 decades, type 2 diabetes (formerly known as adult-onset diabetes) has been reported among US children and adolescents with increasing frequency. Furthermore, studies conducted in Europe showed an increase in the frequency of type 1 diabetes, especially in young children — but it is unclear whether the frequency of type 1 diabetes is also increasing among US youth. Type 1 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Often diagnosed in childhood, but can occur at any age Usually diagnosed after age 30 About 5-10 percent of people with diabetes have type 1 About 90-95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 Not associated with excess body weight Often associated with excess body weight — about 80 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. No known prevention measures Studies have found that people can lower their risk by losing 5 to 7 percent of their body weight through diet and increased physical activity Often a sudden onset Symptoms develop gradually Occurs equally among males and females, but is more common in whites than in nonwhites More common in older people, especially in people who are overweight, and occurs more often in African Americans, American Indians, some Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islander Americans, and Hispanics/Latinos Formerly called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes Increasingly being diagnosed in children and adolescents, especially among African American, Mexican American, and Pacific Islander youth. May be Continue reading >>

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

I realize this might be old news for all you veterans of diabetes out there, but I thought this week I might write a little bit about the key differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. I thought this might be helpful for newcomers to our “Diabetian community” (and let me say that while I’m sorry you find yourself with the diagnosis, we’re happy to welcome you here), or as a resource to share with friends and family who can often have a hard time understanding the differences. The understanding within the general public tends to be something along the lines of this: Diabetics can’t have sugar. That’s about it. So odds are pretty good that someone new to this disease is coming in with an idea that diabetes means you can’t ever have another cookie, but food without sugar is OK. And most of your friends and family will probably CONTINUE to think that well after you’ve gathered more information. Furthermore, the understanding of “Type 1” and “Type 2,” even among people who understand that there ARE two types, is often limited to age brackets — Type 1 is diabetes that starts when someone is young, Type 2 is what you get if you’re post-30. Or, more recently, Type 2 diabetes is linked solely to obesity, while Type 1 is…still diabetes for young people. Two diseases, one name An author of a study I once read pointed out that it’s rather unfortunate that we give the same name to these two diseases, because the mechanisms for how they work, AND the regimen for how we treat them, are very different. So then, without further ado, here is the lowdown on Type 1 diabetes, with Type 2 diabetes in a nutshell to come next week. Type 1 diabetes is the result of an immune system malfunction. A virus moves through our body, usually without us ever even kno Continue reading >>

What Is Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus comprises a group of chronic metabolic disorders characterized by abnormalities in insulin secretion or action (or both) resulting in hyperglycemia—or an excess of glucose (sugar) in the blood. These conditions are associated with disordered carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism and can lead to long-term complications involving the nervous system, and cardiovascular and sensory organs. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that more than 29 million people in the United States have diabetes; and one in four people with diabetes don’t know they have it. The differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes include: Causes Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells—which are the cells that produce insulin—resulting in absolute insulin deficiency. With type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time, it isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Type 2 diabetes is the consequence of a combination of insulin resistance and progressive beta cell destruction. Age of onset Type 1 diabetes was previously known as juvenile diabetes. It is more commonly diagnosed in young children and young adults—before the age of 40. Only 5 percent of people with diabetes have this form of the disease. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed after the age of 40; however, the childhood obesity epidemic in the United States has increased the incidence of children being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. When diagnosed in childhood, it is most often diagnosed during puberty. Symptoms Symptoms for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes include excessive Continue reading >>

This Is Why It's So Important To Know The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

This Is Why It's So Important To Know The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

A family who lost their son to undiagnosed Type 1 diabetes are backing a new campaign to raise awareness of the condition and the dangers of late diagnosis. Beth and Stuart Baldwin, together with their daughter Lia, 11, have raised almost £70,000 for charity since their son Peter died in January 2015. Despite showing typical symptoms of Type 1 diabetes like extreme fatigue, weight loss, and frequently needing to go to the toilet, the 13-year-old was not diagnosed until he was already seriously ill and passed away just days later. Beth said: “Losing a child is beyond anyone’s worst nightmare. It’s something that no family should have to go through and now it’s our mission to make sure that parents and medical professionals have the symptoms of Type 1 at the front of their minds. “Type 1 diabetes can be easily mistaken for viral infections or other illnesses. “Peter was very unwell with a chest infection at the time, which made the symptoms of his Type 1 diabetes harder to identify. “We need to be much more vigilant if we’re going to put a stop to completely preventable deaths. “The symptoms are simply toilet, tired, thirsty, thinner. If your child has any of these, trust your instinct and insist that they are tested. “Being able to recognise the symptoms, get a quick diagnosis, and early treatment could save your child’s life. “This is Peter’s legacy, and it’s all about helping as many other families as we can.” About one in five children with Type 1 diabetes in Wales aren’t diagnosed until they are in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a life-threatening condition that requires urgent medical attention. The Know Type 1 campaign, which launches in line with Diabetes Week (June 11-17) is focused specifically on the importance of recognising the Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Today, when most people think about diabetes, they probably assume the condition in question is Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is commonly associated with obesity, heart disease and kidney disease. Having Type 2 diabetes does not necessitate the use of insulin, but often elicits the use of other drugs that either promote insulin secretion or prevent excess glucose from entering the bloodstream through a variety of mechanisms. Because only about 5 percent of the population of those living with diabetes has Type 1 diabetes, this condition is often glanced over or forgotten. But individuals within this subset often carry emotional, mental and nutritional concerns that are much different from those living with Type 2 diabetes. What is Type 1 Diabetes? Those who have Type 1 diabetes lack of insulin production. This means that glucose is not able to be removed from the bloodstream to be used within the cells of the body. Typically, diagnosis happens before the age of 20, but it can happen at any age depending on the severity of the disease. It appears that those diagnosed later in life are able to manage their diabetes easier than those who completely lose function early. Signs that someone may have Type 1 diabetes include frequent urination, excessive thirst or hunger, drowsiness, fruity-smelling breath and even seizures. The root cause of this disease is still unknown; however genetic and environmental factors are believed to play a role. Nutrition and lifestyle have nothing to do with the development of Type 1 diabetes. What is It Like to Have Type 1 Diabetes? People with Type 1 diabetes have to check their blood sugars often, manage meals and snacks with insulin, and overcome unexpected high- and low-blood sugar levels. They also need to carry a glucometer, glucagon pen Continue reading >>

Difference Between Type One And Type Two

Difference Between Type One And Type Two

There are different kinds of diabetes; there is type one, type two, and gestational diabetes. In general, people with diabetes either have a total lack of insulin (type 1 diabetes) or they have too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively (type 2 diabetes). Type 1 diabetes (formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes), accounts for 5 to 10 out of 100 people who have diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, eventually eliminating insulin production from the body. Without insulin, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose), which they need to produce energy. In type 1 diabetes, Symptoms usually start in childhood or young adulthood. People often seek medical help, because they are seriously ill from sudden symptoms of high blood sugar. Episodes of low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia) are common. It also cannot be prevented. Type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset or non–insulin-dependent diabetes) can develop at any age. It most commonly becomes apparent during adulthood. But type 2 diabetes in children is rising. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the vast majority of people who have diabetes—90 to 95 out of 100 people. In type 2 diabetes, the body isn't able to use insulin the right way. This is called insulin resistance. As type 2 diabetes gets worse, the pancreas may make less and less insulin. This is called insulin deficiency. The person may not have symptoms before diagnosis. Usually the disease is discovered in adulthood, but an increasing number of children are being diagnosed with the disease. There are no episodes of low blood sugar level, unless the person is taking insulin or certain diabetes medicines. It can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including maintaining a h Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus, known simply as diabetes is described as a metabolism disorder. When we speak of metabolism we are referring to the way digestion occurs in our bodies. Diabetes is a disease characterized by high sugar (glucose) in the blood. There are two major causes of the metabolic disease. Diabetes could occur when the body has inadequate insulin production or when the cells fail to respond adequately to insulin. Diabetic patients tend to experience symptoms such as frequent urination (polyuria), frequent bouts of hunger (polyphagia) and thirst (polydipsia). What are the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What Is the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? Watch a video for basic comparison between type 1 and type 2 diabetes before reading on for more: Differences Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Type 1 Type 2 Basic Information 70 percent of type 1 diabetes diagnoses are in early adulthood in persons aged below 30 years old. The good news is that this type of diabetes doesn’t affect many, and it accounts for only five to 10 percent of the diabetic population. With type 1 diabetes, the body fails to produce sufficient insulin meaning the patient will have to take insulin injections for life. This is why type 1diabetes is referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes or juvenile diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was for the longest time referred to as ‘adult onset diabetes’. However over the past two decades, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have reported cases of an increase in adolescents and children in the U.S with this diabetes. This is the most prevalent type of diabetes and accounts for 90 percent of diabetics. Type 2 diabetes occurs when then the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin or when the cells resist the insulin, som Continue reading >>

Do You Know The Difference Between 'type 1' And 'type 2' Diabetes?

Do You Know The Difference Between 'type 1' And 'type 2' Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes is an illness that affects around 240-thousand Kiwis... and around 100-thousand don't know they have it yet. However, the disease is not always associated with an unhealthy lifestyle. 'Knowing the difference' between type 1 and type 2 is this year's focus for World Diabetes Awareness Month... Director of Youth for Diabetes New Zealand, Ruby McGill spoke to Duncan Garner. Watch the video. Continue reading >>

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