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What Is The Difference Between Type L And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Type 2 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Your best days lay aheadand thats why were here. Maybe youve just been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Or maybe youve been living with it for awhile. Heres the thing: your journey is unique and it starts fresh every day. No matter where you are with type 2 diabetes, there are some things you should know. It's the most common form of diabetes. Type 2 means that your body doesn't use insulin properly. And while some people can control their blood sugar levels with healthy eating and exercise, others may need medication or insulin to manage it. Regardless, you have everything you need to fight it. Theres no one-size-fits-all treatment for type 2, but we can help you take each step forward. You have tools. You have resources, friends, and healthcare providers. Whatever step you take next, know that you won't take it alone. Fitness is a key part of managing type 2. And the good news, all you have to do is get moving. You dont have to become an ultra-marathoner. You can start slowly with a walk around the block or a simple bike ride. The key is to find activities you love and do them as often as you can. Work with your doctor to determine what level of physical activity you should engage in Figure out how much time per day you can devote to exercise Set fitness goalshaving clear goals can help you stay motivated Consider where youll start working outthe gym, in your neighborhood, in a park? Build different activitiesinto your daily routine Keep track of what you do and stay focused on your goals Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

What Do They Have in Common? Abstract Type 1 and type 2 diabetes frequently co-occur in the same families, suggesting common genetic susceptibility. Such mixed family history is associated with an intermediate phenotype of diabetes: insulin resistance and cardiovascular complications in type 1 diabetic patients and lower BMI and less cardiovascular complications as well as lower C-peptide concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients. GAD antibody positivity is more common in type 2 diabetic patients from mixed families than from common type 2 diabetes families. The mixed family history is associated with more type 1–like genetic (HLA and insulin gene) and phenotypic characteristics in type 2 diabetic patients, especially in the GAD antibody–positive subgroup. Leaving out the extreme ends of diabetes phenotypes, young children progressing rapidly to total insulin deficiency and strongly insulin-resistant subjects mostly with non-Europid ethnic origin, a large proportion of diabetic patients may have both type 1 and type 2 processes contributing to their diabetic phenotype. Diabetes in most cases is caused by a loss of the physical or functional β-cell mass, mostly due to an autoimmune process (type 1 etiological process) and/or increased need for insulin due to insulin resistance (type 2 process) (1). Both of these major diabetes types are believed to include different stages of disease, ranging from non–insulin-requiring to insulin-requiring for control or survival. According to this classification adopted by the World Health Organization, it is quite possible that both processes would operate in a single patient and contribute to the phenotype of the patient. Also, factors other than autoimmunity can lead to a defective insulin response to glucose. Both major diab Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis To diagnose type 2 diabetes, you'll be given a: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates you have diabetes. A result between 5.7 and 6.4 percent is considered prediabetes, which indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Normal levels are below 5.7 percent. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions — such as if you're pregnant or have an uncommon form of hemoglobin (known as a hemoglobin variant) — that can make the A1C test inaccurate, your doctor may use the following tests to diagnose diabetes: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. Oral glucose tolerance test. For this test, you fast overnight, and the fasting blood sugar level is measured. Then you drink a sugary liquid, and blood s Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chan Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

If your child or someone you know has been recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering how the disease differs from type 2 diabetes — the form people tend to know more about. What causes type 1 versus type 2 diabetes? Are the symptoms the same? And how is each treated? Here to clear up the confusion with an overview of key differences — and similarities — between these two types of diabetes are experts Julie Settles, M.S.N., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.E.N., a clinical research scientist at Lilly Diabetes, and Rosemary Briars, N.D., P.N.P.-B.C., C.D.E., C.C.D.C., clinical director and program co-director of the Chicago Children’s Diabetes Center at La Rabida Children’s Hospital. Causes Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, as it’s formally known in medical terms, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person develops high blood glucose (blood sugar). The underlying health factors causing the high blood sugar will determine whether someone is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which “the body’s immune system starts to make antibodies that are targeted directly at the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (islet cells),” explains Briars. Over time, the immune system “gradually destroys the islet cells, so insulin is no longer made and the person has to take insulin every day, from then on,” she says. As for why this happens, Settles notes, “The immune system normally fights off viruses and bacteria that we do not want in our body, but when it causes diabetes, it is because something has gone wrong and now the body attacks its own cells.” Triggering this autoimmune response is a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors that researchers are still trying to fully understand. O Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Wikipedia

Type 2 Diabetes - Wikipedia

Type 2 diabetes (T2D), formerly known as adult-onset diabetes, is a form of diabetes that is characterized by high blood sugar , insulin resistance , and relative lack of insulin . [6] Common symptoms include increased thirst , frequent urination , and unexplained weight loss . [3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger , feeling tired, and sores that do not heal. [3] Often symptoms come on slowly. [6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease , strokes , diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness , kidney failure , and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations . [1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon. [4] [5] Universal blue circle symbol for diabetes [2] Maintaining normal weight, exercising , eating properly [1] Type2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise. [1] Some people are more genetically at risk than others. [6] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes , with the other 10% due primarily to type 1 diabetes and gestational diabetes . [1] In type 1 diabetes there is a lower total level of insulin to control blood glucose, due to an autoimmune induced loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas . [12] [13] Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose , oral glucose tolerance test , or glycated hemoglobin (A1C). [3] Type2 diabetes is partly preventable by staying a normal weight, exercising regularly, and eating properly. [1] Treatment involves exercise and dietary changes . [1] If blood sugar levels are not adequately lowered, the medication metformin is typically recommended. [7] [14] Many people may eventually also require insulin injections. [9] In those on insulin, Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 And 2

Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 And 2

Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 and 2 Diabetes: Differences Between Type 1 and 2 In general, people with diabetes either have a total lack of insulin (type 1 diabetes) or they have too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively (type 2 diabetes). Type 1 diabetes (formerly called juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes), accounts for 5 to 10 out of 100 people who have diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body's immune system destroys the cells that release insulin , eventually eliminating insulin production from the body. Without insulin, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose), which they need to produce energy. Type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes) can develop at any age. It most commonly becomes apparent during adulthood. But type 2 diabetes in children is rising. Type 2 diabetes accounts for the vast majority of people who have diabetes90 to 95 out of 100 people. In type 2 diabetes, the body isn't able to use insulin the right way. This is called insulin resistance. As type 2 diabetes gets worse, the pancreas may make less and less insulin. This is called insulin deficiency. Differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Symptoms usually start in childhood or young adulthood. People often seek medical help, because they are seriously ill from sudden symptoms of high blood sugar. The person may not have symptoms before diagnosis. Usually the disease is discovered in adulthood, but an increasing number of children are being diagnosed with the disease. Episodes of low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia) are common. There are no episodes of low blood sugar level, unless the person is taking insulin or certain diabetes medicines. It can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including maintaining a healthy weight, Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Key Facts

Type 2 Diabetes: Key Facts

Type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus) is more common than type 1 diabetes. Around 90 to 95 percent of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National 2014 Diabetes Statistics Report, 29.1 million Americans, or 9.3% of the US population have diabetes. This number reflects the 21 million who are currently diagnosed and another 8.1 million who do not even know they have diabetes. There are several key differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The most important difference is in the hormone insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that allows your body to use sugar (glucose) from carbohydrates in the food that you eat for energy or to store glucose for future use. Insulin helps keeps your blood sugar level from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin at all. People with type 2 diabetes still produce insulin, however the cells in the muscles, liver and fat tissue are inefficient at absorbing the insulin and regulating glucose. As a result, the body tries to compensate by having the pancreas pump out more insulin. But eventually the pancreas slowly loses the ability to produce enough insulin, and as a result the cells don’t get the energy they need. Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, meaning that the longer someone has it, the more “help” they will need to manage blood glucose levels. This will require more medications and eventually, injected insulin will be needed. People with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use it correctly; this is referred to as being insulin resistant. People with type 2 diabetes may also be unable to produce enough insulin to handle the gluco Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

There are three major types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. All types of diabetes cause blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but they do this in different ways Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but is most commonly diagnosed from infancy to the late 30s. With this type of diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces no insulin. It occurs when the body’s own defence system (the immune system) attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. What causes the immune system to do this is not yet completely understood, but we are funding research to find out. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common type of diabetes – in the UK over 90 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2. Type 2 diabetes usually affects those over 40, or 25 if you’re of South Asian descent. However, it is becoming more common among young people due to lifestyle. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes are not always obvious and, unlike with type 1, they can take a long time to develop. People with type 2 diabetes either don’t make enough insulin or don’t make insulin that the body can use properly. The cells in the body become resistant to insulin, making a greater amount of insulin necessary to keep blood glucose levels within a normal range. Eventually, the pancreas can wear out from producing extra insulin, and it may start making less and less. Type 2 can usually be managed through diet, exercise, and self-monitoring blood glucose, at least in the first few years following diagnosis. However, type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, and most people will need to take tablets and/or inject insulin after living with it for five to 10 years. LADA Up to a third of people who were initially diagnosed as having type Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas by special cells, called beta cells. The pancreas is below and behind the stomach. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar (glucose) into cells. Inside the cells, glucose is stored and later used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your fat, liver, and muscle cells do not respond correctly to insulin. This is called insulin resistance. As a result, blood sugar does not get into these cells to be stored for energy. When sugar cannot enter cells, a high level of sugar builds up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. The body is unable to use the glucose for energy. This leads to the symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes usually develops slowly over time. Most people with the disease are overweight or obese when they are diagnosed. Increased fat makes it harder for your body to use insulin the correct way. Type 2 diabetes can also develop in people who are thin. This is more common in older adults. Family history and genes play a role in type 2 diabetes. Low activity level, poor diet, and excess body weight around the waist increase your chance of getting the disease. Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Way To Distinguish Type 1 And 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Best Way To Distinguish Type 1 And 2 Diabetes?

Onset of diabetes in childhood with ketoacidosis and insulin dependency has traditionally been sufficient to diagnose type 1 diabetes, while onset in older, obese patients with primary insulin resistance suggested type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, features of type 1 and type 2 diabetes may be present in the same patient, making differentiation difficult. No diagnostic studies in the literature were identified that definitively demonstrate how to separate type 1 from type 2 diabetes. A patient’s age may suggest, but does not reliably distinguish, diabetes types. A study of 569 new-onset type 1 and type 2 diabetic children and adolescents showed that older age was only weakly associated with type 2 diagnosis (odds ratio [OR]= 1.4 for each 1-year increment in age; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3–1.6).2 In fact, newly diagnosed 12-year-old children have an equal incidence of type 1 as type 2 diabetes. Likewise, adults with type 2 phenotype (no initial insulin requirement) can present with positive autoantibodies typically found in younger type 1 patients. Older patients who fit this profile have been classified as type 1.5 diabetes or latent autoimmune disease in adults (LADA).3 A history of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) also does not reliably distinguish between types 1 and 2. A retrospective chart review gathered data on adults over 18 years of age who were admitted for DKA in a urban US hospital. Many patients with DKA were subsequently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Rates of type 2 diabetes in patients with DKA varied by race: 47% of Hispanics, 44% of African Americans, and 17% of Caucasians had type 2 diabetes.4 The overlapping presence of autoantibodies in both types of diabetes limits their use (TABLE). Autoantibodies do predict an earlier need for insulin. One pr Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Type 1 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

With the right tools and support, you can do anything. Whether you've been newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, are helping a loved one or have been managing your condition for a while, help is here. No matter how type 1 diabetes has shown up in your life, you can find success by balancing your medications, and sticking to your daily exercise routine and nutrition plan. But wherever youre at with this challenge, you can always reach out for help of any kindfrom your caregivers, your family, or other people who live with type 1 diabetes. Stress is natural part of fighting type 1 diabetes, so if youre experiencing unusual stress, depression, or anxiety of any kind, know that youre not alone. A heightened risk for mental health challenges comes hand in hand with all of the physical challenges, so know that its not your faultand there are plenty of resources and support to help you along the way. Knowing what to eat with type 1 diabetes can be tough. You need a strategy for balancing food, insulin doses, and physical activity to maintain your blood sugar levels. Learning how different foods affect your blood sugar and figuring out how to balance that within your daily routine is key. And remember, it can be a little bit of trial and error. Experiment with different foods and watch your blood sugar as daily activities change. You can also work with a dietician to build a personalized nutrition plan that works for you. The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Care Manual can help you navigate any challenge with confidence. The manual covers everything, from blood sugar goals to complications and special considerations by age. Everyone manages their diabetes in different ways. But the key to finding the right way to manage type 1 diabetes lies in working with your healthcare providers to di Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes?

Yahoo!-ABC News Network | 2018 ABC News Internet Ventures. All rights reserved. What Is The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes? Question: What is the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes? Answer: There are several types of diabetes; I'm going to discuss the two main types: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 formerly called juvenile onset diabetes occurs typically before the age of 20. Individuals with type 1 diabetes are usually thin, and the cause of type 1 diabetes is that the pancreas, the organ that secretes insulin, is destroyed by autoantibodies, that's why people with type 1 diabetes always need insulin, either injected or through an insulin pump. Type 1 diabetes occurs in about 10-15 percent of all the diabetics in the country. Now, the most common type of diabetes is what we call type 2, formerly called adult onset. Type 2 diabetics are usually heavy, usually diagnosed after the age of 35. Now, the cause of type 2 diabetes is quite different from type 1. The cause of type 2 diabete is primarily a complicated medical condition called 'insulin resistance.' In fact, in the early stages of type 2 diabetes, there's plenty of insulin around, it just doesn't work well. To treat type 2 diabetes, we typically use lifestyle, and that may work alone -- just diet and exercise -- then we may need oral medications, and it is not uncommon for someone with type 2 diabetes to eventually need insulin, either with or without the oral medications. Now, type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately 85 to 90 percent of all the diabetics in the country. The other important thing that needs to be said is that type 2 diabetes is associated with heart disease, and that's why it's so important to not only treat the glucose levels, but also to attack blood press Continue reading >>

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

I realize this might be old news for all you veterans of diabetes out there, but I thought this week I might write a little bit about the key differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. I thought this might be helpful for newcomers to our “Diabetian community” (and let me say that while I’m sorry you find yourself with the diagnosis, we’re happy to welcome you here), or as a resource to share with friends and family who can often have a hard time understanding the differences. The understanding within the general public tends to be something along the lines of this: Diabetics can’t have sugar. That’s about it. So odds are pretty good that someone new to this disease is coming in with an idea that diabetes means you can’t ever have another cookie, but food without sugar is OK. And most of your friends and family will probably CONTINUE to think that well after you’ve gathered more information. Furthermore, the understanding of “Type 1” and “Type 2,” even among people who understand that there ARE two types, is often limited to age brackets — Type 1 is diabetes that starts when someone is young, Type 2 is what you get if you’re post-30. Or, more recently, Type 2 diabetes is linked solely to obesity, while Type 1 is…still diabetes for young people. Two diseases, one name An author of a study I once read pointed out that it’s rather unfortunate that we give the same name to these two diseases, because the mechanisms for how they work, AND the regimen for how we treat them, are very different. So then, without further ado, here is the lowdown on Type 1 diabetes, with Type 2 diabetes in a nutshell to come next week. Type 1 diabetes is the result of an immune system malfunction. A virus moves through our body, usually without us ever even kno Continue reading >>

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