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What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus?

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus And Diabetes Mellitus

The word Diabetes is well known and it is mostly associated with a disease involving difficulties with sugar. There are actually two unrelated diseases named Diabetes - Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus. This article is to highlight each and to show the differences between the two. Similarities Both diseases are dependent on the action of hormones; Insulin for Diabetes Mellitus and Vasopressin for Diabetes Insipidus. Insulin is produced in the pancreas. Vasopressin is produced by the Hypothalamus and stored in the pituitary gland. Insulin is necessary for the utilization of sugar/glucose. Vasopressin is the hormone that regulates the body’s retention of water. In both the diseases there are variances derived the same way. A lack of or not enough of the hormone and a specific type of the disease is present. A lack of Insulin and the disease is Diabetes Mellitus Type 1. A lack of Vasopressin and the disease is Neurogenic Diabetes Insipidus. When the body is unable to use the hormone effectively another condition is present. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2, when the cells are insulin resistant. When the kidneys are insensitive to vasopressin, Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus (vasopressin-resistant) is the result. During pregnancy, the body is subjected to a multitude of diverse hormones and chemical reactions, caused mostly by the placenta. This hormonal imbalance can cause a temporary disease that occurs only during the pregnancy. The resistance to Insulin results in gestational diabetes mellitus. A deficiency of vasopressin causes gestagenic diabetes insipidus, also known as gestational diabetes insipidus. With both diseases, the body returns to normal shortly (four to six weeks) after the delivery. Diabetes Insipidus have a fourth condition, with no equivalent in diabet Continue reading >>

Know The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus.

Know The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus.

Diabetes – We know what it is… Insulin deficiency! How does that occur? Here is how – When we consume a meal that contains carbohydrates and sugar, it is absorbed into our bloodstream quickly. But when the amount of sugar gets too high in our blood, we might become a diabetes victim. Now let us know the differentiation between Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus are very different conditions. Except the word “diabetes,” the common factors between these 2 are that both involve thirst as well as urination. But beyond this point the conditions differ significantly. Diabetes Insipidus – What is it? This happens due to some injuries or else viral diseases, the hypothalamus or pituitary gland gets damaged and it might be rendered unable to produce the hormone called as vasopressin. Vasopressin is created as well as secreted by our brain in order to control the water metabolism. According to a detailed study from National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse, when this specific hormone is secreted to our kidneys it directs our kidneys to concentrate urine through a filtration process. And in the presence the condition – Diabetes insipidus, this process of communication from the production as well as secretion of vasopressin is disrupted completely before reaching the kidneys. As discussed earlier, the defect might be in the kidneys or they might be damaged due to specific reasons that results in inability to respond to the hormone vasopressin. This situation or the inability to respond to vasopressin results our body to lose water through excessive urination. This condition is known as diabetes insipidus. Diabetes Mellitus – What is it? Diabetes mellitus differs from diabetes insipidus especially Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Main Difference Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body is unable to produce enough insulin to maintain the blood glucose level resulting in high glucose level in blood. Diabetes is a general term for diabetes mellitus. Diabetes insipidus is a disease characterized by excessive thirst with excretion of large amount of diluted urine. Diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus are two totally different medical conditions. In diabetes mellitus polyuria is because of osmotic diuresis while in diabetes insipidus polyuria is because of diminished production of ADH (antidiuretic hormone) or kidney’s response to ADH. Diabetes mellitus commonly referred as diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which the blood glucose level is prolonged for a long time. Diabetes is due to cells of pancreas do not produce enough insulin or the cells of the body do not response adequately to the insulin produced. Diabetes mellitus is classified into type I DM and type II DM. Type I DM also known as insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile diabetes. In type I DM cells of pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to maintain the blood glucose level. The etiology of type I DM is unknown. Type II DM also called non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult onset diabetes. In type II DM body’s cells fails to respond to insulin produced by pancreas. Type II DM primary cause is excessive weight gain and not enough activity. There is also another type of diabetes that occur during pregnancy known as gestational diabetes. Symptoms of untreated diabetes mellitus are polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia and weight loss. Symptoms can be developed within one month of type I DM while in type II DM the symptoms develop much more slowly. Type I DM can be treated on Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Main Difference – Diabetes Mellitus vs Diabetes Insipidus Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus are two different medical conditions which arise due to a dysregulation of the endocrine system. Even though they share several similar features, the pathophysiology behind them has significant differences depending on the fundamental etiology and the progression of the pathological changes. The main difference between diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus is that diabetes insipidus involves a problem with the production of antidiuretic hormone or kidney’s response to antidiuretic hormone (nephrogenic diabetes insipidus), whereas diabetes mellitus is caused by a deficiency of the pancreatic hormone insulin. This article covers, 1. What is Diabetes Mellitus? – Definition, Cause, Signs and Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment 2. What is Diabetes Insipidus? – Definition, Cause, Signs and Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment 3. What is the difference between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus? What is Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is a long term ailment of metabolism that includes Diabetes type 1 and 2 which occur due to a malfunctional pancreas which fails to secrete required amounts of Insulin or poorly functioning insulin either due to an inherent pathology or acquired condition later in life, respectively. It can also happen as a result of excessive blood glucose, which does not respond to the secreted amount of insulin due to a separate mechanism known as Insulin resistance. There are 2 types of Diabetes: Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is a condition occurring due to the destruction of pancreatic Beta cells by autoimmune cells in the body. The patients rely on insulin injection since the body is not able to produce its own insulin. This condition can affect in Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus Vs Diabetes Insipidus

Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus Vs Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus (DI) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two medical conditions which are often confused as meaning the same thing. However, you should not mistake DI for DM which occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or becomes resistant to insulin. DI is associated with excessive urination and thirst. Hence, when you consider DI vs DM, you should know that they are not related in any way, though they may share the same symptoms such as excessive urination and excessive thirst. DM is a common condition compared to DI, which is rare. This could be attributed to the fact that DM is more prevalent compared to DI. That means there is a higher number of people diagnosed with DM compared to those diagnosed with DI. Another reason would be that DM is a serious medical condition which requires adopting a healthy lifestyle, such as exercise and diet, and insulin therapy. Any changes in these factors could be fatal in the long or short term. However, DI is not considered as serious a medical condition and can be managed by drinking enough fluids every day. What is DI? Diabetes insipidus is a rare medical condition characterized by high passage of urine due to kidney problems. This condition usually occurs when there is an imbalance of fluids in the body as a result of the kidney failing to regulate body fluids properly. This results in excessive thirst, even after taking water, and excessive urination (polyuria). Because of the high passage of urine, patients with DI may become dehydrated if they do not drink enough water to make up for the lost fluids. When functioning properly, your kidneys will remove excess water from your blood. This water waste will be stored in the bladder in the form urine which will be excreted from your body as urine. In case the fluid reg Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus: What's The Difference?

Diabetes Mellitus Vs. Diabetes Insipidus: What's The Difference?

The word diabetes is related to excess urination or polyuria. In physiology, we study two types of diabetes. One is diabetes mellitus, and other is diabetes insipidus. Both of the diseases are way different from each other due their cause and origin etc., but they have one thing in common: excess urination. Diabetes mellitus is a most common type of diabetes; it is characterized by excess glucose level in the blood that is followed by excess urination. And, diabetes insipidus is the disorder characterized by the excess urination due to function instability of ADH or lack of ADH, in this excess water is lost from the body which results in many serious conditions like dehydration, etc. The main difference in between diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus is the hormone. In diabetes mellitus Insulin is involved, whereas in diabetes insipidus ADH is involved. AdHealthPlus50 Visit Site Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Insipidus Glucose Level In diabetes mellitus, blood glucose level is high. In diabetes insipidus, the glucose level is normal, but excess water is lost. Hormone Diabetes mellitus is related to a hormone called insulin. Diabetes insipidus is related to hormone ADH. Gland In diabetes mellitus, a gland that is involved is the pancreas. In diabetes insipidus, pituitary gland is involved. Types of Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is more common in types of diabetes. Diabetes insipidus is less seen. Symptoms In diabetes mellitus, patient feel hungry due to loss of glucose in urine. In diabetes insipidus, the patient feels thirsty due to loss of excess water. Diabetes means excess urination and Mellitus means honey. Diabetes mellitus is the most common disorder seen around. This disorder is characterized by excess glucose in the blood which leads to polyurea. Normal blood gluco Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus Vs. Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood while diabetes insipidus is a disease where kidneys are unable to conserve water. Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a rare disease while diabetes mellitus is very common; "diabetes" in general usage refers to diabetes mellitus, which is of 3 types — gestational, Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The causes, symptoms, treatment and prognosis for diabetes insipidus are different from diabetes mellitus. Comparison chart Excessive thirst, excess volume of severely diluted urine. High blood sugar, excessive urination, increased thirst, increased hunger. 3 in 100,000 people 7.7 per 1000 people Deficiency of ADH. Brain tumor, head injury, medication such as lithium, genetics Type 1 - Autoimmune Disease; Type 2 - Genetics, lifestyle, infection Typically desmopressin (nasal spray) or IM, IV hypertonic saline solution (3% or 5%). Thiazide diuretics. Insulin and lifestyle management Causes and Types of Diabetes Diabetes insipidus Diabetes insipidus, or DI, is characterized by the inability of kidneys to conserve water when they purify blood. This can be either because of: a deficiency of ADH (antidiuretic hormone or vasopressin), or a failure of the kidneys to respond to ADH In the first case, the condition is called central DI, and in the second case it is called nephrogenic DI. Central DI is the more common form of the disease. Central DI can be inherited or caused due to damage to either the hypothalamus (the part of the brain that produces ADH) or the pituitary gland, where ADH is stored. Head injuries, tumors, infections or surgery can inflict such damage. Nephrogenic DI can be inherited (from mother to son) or be caused by kidney disease, hypercalcemia (excess calcium in the body) or by certain drugs such as lithiu Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

On this page: What is diabetes insipidus? Diabetes insipidus is a rare disorder that occurs when a person's kidneys pass an abnormally large volume of urine that is insipid—dilute and odorless. In most people, the kidneys pass about 1 to 2 quarts of urine a day. In people with diabetes insipidus, the kidneys can pass 3 to 20 quarts of urine a day. As a result, a person with diabetes insipidus may feel the need to drink large amounts of liquids. Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus—which includes both type 1 and type 2 diabetes—are unrelated, although both conditions cause frequent urination and constant thirst. Diabetes mellitus causes high blood glucose, or blood sugar, resulting from the body's inability to use blood glucose for energy. People with diabetes insipidus have normal blood glucose levels; however, their kidneys cannot balance fluid in the body. What are the kidneys and what do they do? The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of the spine. Every day, the kidneys normally filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. The urine flows from the kidneys to the bladder through tubes called ureters. The bladder stores urine. When the bladder empties, urine flows out of the body through a tube called the urethra, located at the bottom of the bladder. How is fluid regulated in the body? A person's body regulates fluid by balancing liquid intake and removing extra fluid. Thirst usually controls a person’s rate of liquid intake, while urination removes most fluid, although people also lose fluid through sweating, breathing, or diarrhea. The hormone vasopressin, also called antidiuretic hormone, con Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs And Cats

Diabetes In Dogs And Cats

Diabetes is something that most people think only humans can develop, but the truth is that dogs and cats can also develop diabetes. And like humans, dogs and cats are susceptible to both diabetes mellitus and diabetes insipidus. This guide will help you learn more about diabetes in dogs and cats so you get your pet the treatment they need, or to help prevent your pet from developing diabetes in the first place. 4 Key Facts About Diabetes in Cats and Dogs Diabetes is a fatal disease for cats and dogs if it is left untreated If a cat or dog requires insulin, there is a chance that the pet could recover after a period and no longer need it How the insulin is administered can affect how it works A cat or dog’s diet is the top factor in causing, treating, and avoiding diabetes The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus and Diabetes Insipidus in Cats and Dogs Of the two types of diabetes, diabetes mellitus is the most common to develop in dogs and cats. It is diagnosed as either Type I or Type II diabetes mellitus. Type I is known as “Insulin Dependent Diabetes.” This type of diabetes is caused by a total or near-total destruction of the beta-cells in the animal’s body. Type II diabetes, on the other hand, leaves some insulin-producing cells in the body, although not enough to do an adequate job of regulating the animal’s blood sugar levels. For this reason, it is known as “Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus.” This type of diabetes is most commonly caused by obesity and poor diet. Diabetes insipidus is the rarer of the two forms of diabetes. It is also known as “watery diabetes” or “weak diabetes” because it affects the animal’s water metabolism. Rather than storing water, the animal’s body releases it, thus causing increased thirst and urination Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes insipidus (DI) is a condition characterized by large amounts of dilute urine and increased thirst.[1] The amount of urine produced can be nearly 20 liters per day.[1] Reduction of fluid has little effect on the concentration of the urine.[1] Complications may include dehydration or seizures.[1] There are four types of DI, each with a different set of causes.[1] Central DI (CDI) is due to a lack of the hormone vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone).[1] This can be due to damage to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland or genetics.[1] Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) occurs when the kidneys do not respond properly to vasopressin.[1] Dipsogenic DI is due to abnormal thirst mechanisms in the hypothalamus while gestational DI occurs only during pregnancy.[1] Diagnosis is often based on urine tests, blood tests, and the fluid deprivation test.[1] Diabetes mellitus is a separate condition with an unrelated mechanism, though both can result in the production of large amounts of urine.[1] Treatment involves drinking sufficient fluids to prevent dehydration.[1] Other treatments depend on the type.[1] In central and gestational disease treated is with desmopressin.[1] Nephrogenic disease may be treated by addressing the underlying cause or the use of a thiazide, aspirin, or ibuprofen.[1] The number of new cases of diabetes insipidus each year is 3 in 100,000.[4] Central DI usually starts between the ages of 10 and 20 and occurs in males and females equally.[2] Nephrogenic DI can begin at any age.[3] The term "diabetes" is derived from the Greek word meaning siphon.[5] Signs and symptoms[edit] Excessive urination and extreme thirst and increased fluid intake (especially for cold water and sometimes ice or ice water) are typical for DI.[6] The symptoms of excessive urination Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

The word diabetes is an interesting one. Its origin is in the Greek language where it is derived from the word for a siphon or, more simply, a pipe or hose. This word was used to describe the disorder in ancient times (and diabetes was recognized in great antiquity) because those suffering from it produced such plentiful amounts of urine that they were reminiscent of a water pipe. The reason for the plentiful amounts of urine lies in the fact that when the sugar glucose reaches excessively high levels in our bloodstream, it is filtered into the kidney and enters the urine in large quantities. Due to its chemical and physical properties, when large amounts of glucose are filtered by our kidneys into the urine, it cannot be fully reabsorbed and retains a large amount of water with it, thus creating very large volumes of urine. The second part of the name, mellitus, is derived from the word meaning sweet, as in mellifluous music. Mellitus was added when it was discovered that the urine in a person with diabetes and very high blood sugar is sweet. Diabetes mellitus A condition characterized by inadequate production of insulin or resistance of the body's tissues to its actions, which results in excessive levels of glucose in the blood. Diabetes insipidus is a disorder with an entirely different basis, but its sufferers share the siphon-like quality of very frequent and very high volume urination. Diabetes insipidus is due to failure of production or action of another vital hormone, known as arginine vasopressin (AVP), also called antidiuretic hormone (ADH), that is responsible for maintaining the normal volume and concentration of our urine. When AVP is deficient (usually due to damage or disease of the hypothalamus or pituitary gland) or fails to work (usually due to diseas Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

What Is The Difference Between Diabetes Mellitus And Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Support Site is a participant in Affiliate Programs such as the Amazon Services Associates Program and eBay Partner Network. Affiliate advertising programs designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by linking to Amazon and Ebay. This means that for certain products we advertise in this website we may get a small commission if you decide to purchase the product via that link. You will never pay more when buying a product through one of our links. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus Vs Mellitus

Diabetes Insipidus Vs Mellitus

Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus might share a name and have some similar symptoms, but they are two very different diseases. They also require two very different treatments. Because diabetes mellitus involves blood sugar levels and insulin resistance, it is important for most people to use a blood sugar monitoring device daily and eat low glycemic foods that won’t spike their blood sugar levels. For diabetes insipidus, it isn’t blood sugar that is the problem, but blood water levels. The body produces a hormone called Vasopressin that is supposed to control how much water the kidneys take out of the blood stream. Converted to urine, these fluids flush out the wastes that the kidneys filter out. When this system malfunctions, a person’s thirst increases because the body thinks it needs more water to flush out impurities. By paying attention to the specific signs and symptoms of each disease, it becomes possible to discover which is the problem and find an appropriate solution to the issue. Here are the common symptoms and what they mean for each. Excessive Fatigue For diabetes insipidus, excessive fatigue occurs because of an overall lack of hydration. It may also be caused by an electrolyte imbalance. For diabetes mellitus, excessive fatigue generally occurs because blood sugar levels are too low or too high. Excessive Thirst This symptom occurs in diabetes insipidus because the body senses a lack of Vasopressin and so it demands more fluids because it thinks it needs them. For diabetes mellitus, the excessive thirst occurs because of excessive glucose levels that need to be expelled from the body. Urine for those with diabetes insipidus is clear and transparent, while with diabetes mellitus, it is yellow, pale, and often cloudy. Blurred Vision With diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus

Diabetes Insipidus

Tweet Diabetes insipidus, often shortened to DI, is a rare form of diabetes that is not related to blood sugar-related diabetes mellitus, but does share some of its signs and symptoms. Diabetes insipidus is simply excessive urination (polyuria) and complications thereof, caused by an antidiuretice hormone called a vasopressin. Read on to find out more about what diabetes insipidus is, how it affects the body, the different forms of the disease, and how it is diagnosed and treated. What are the symptoms of diabetes insipidus? Diabetes Insipidus leads to frequent urination, and this is the most common and clear symptom. In extreme cases, urination can be in excess of 20 litres per day. A secondary symptom is increased thirst, as a result of passing so much water. If this is not met, then dehydration can occur which, in turn, can lead to: Cracked skin Confusion Dizziness and even Unconsciousness Children suffering from the condition may become irritable or listless, with fever and vomiting also possible. How does diabetes insipidus compare with diabetes mellitus? Diabetes insipidus and diabetes mellitus should not be confused. The two conditions are unrelated, with diabetes insipidus a completely different type of illness. Diabetes mellitus is also far more common. Diabetes mellitus occurs due to insulin resistance or insulin deficiency and subsequent high blood glucose levels. Diabetes Insipidus on the other hand develops as a result of the stilted production of a hormone in the brain, which is released to stop the kidneys producing so much urine in order to retain water. Without this hormone, water is not retained and the kidneys constantly work to their maximum capacity. The word "Mellitus" tagged onto the main form of diabetes comes from an old word roughly meaning "to Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

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