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What Is The Difference Between Actos And Metformin

Common Side Effects Of Actos (pioglitazone Hydrochloride) Drug Center - Rxlist

Common Side Effects Of Actos (pioglitazone Hydrochloride) Drug Center - Rxlist

Actos is available as tablets in strengths of 15, 30 or 45 mg. Dose is dependent on patient response and the prescribing doctor's clinical judgment; glucose tests may help determine doses. Actos and other similar drugs may exacerbate symptoms of congestive heart failure (dyspnea, edema , weight gain) and these symptoms may be serious. Patients with congestive heart failure classified as III or IV (NY Heart Association) should not take this Actos. Other serious side effects of Actos include nausea, vomiting , jaundice , and vision changes or loss; it may also cause hypoglycemia . There are no good studies in pregnant or breastfeeding women. Use of Actos in these patients should weigh risks versus benefits. There are no studies of safety or effectiveness of Actos on pediatric (under 18 years old) patients. Our Actos Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information as well as related drugs, user reviews, supplements , and diseases, and conditions. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Fractures [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ] Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice. Over 8500 patients with type 2 diabetes have been treated with ACTOS in randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trials, including 2605 patients with type 2 diabetes and macrovascular disease treated with ACTOS in the PROactive clinical trial. In these trials, over 6000 patients have been treated with ACTOS for six months or lon Continue reading >>

Best Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

At-a-glance Six classes of oral medicines (and 12 individual drugs) are now available to help the 25.8 million people in the U.S. with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar when diet and lifestyle changes are not enough. Our evaluation of these medicines found the following: Newer drugs are no better. Two drugs from a class called the sulfonylureas and a drug named metformin have been around for more than a decade and work just as well as newer medicines. Indeed, several of the newer drugs, such as Januvia and Onglyza, are less effective than the older medications. Newer drugs are no safer. All diabetes pills have the potential to cause adverse effects, both minor and serious. The drugs’ safety and side effect “profiles” may be the most important factor in your choice. The newer drugs are more expensive. The newer diabetes medicines cost many times more than the older drugs. Taking more than one diabetes drug is often necessary. Many people with diabetes do not get enough blood sugar control from one medicine. Two or more may be necessary. However, taking more than one diabetes drug raises the risk of adverse effects and increases costs. Taking effectiveness, safety, adverse effects, dosing, and cost into consideration, we have chosen the following as Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs if your doctor and you have decided that you need medicine to control your diabetes: Metformin and Metformin Sustained-Release — alone or with glipizide or glimepiride Glipizide and Glipizide Sustained-Release — alone or with metformin Glimepiride — alone or with metformin These medicines are available as low-cost generics, costing from $4 to $35 a month. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, we recommend that you try metformin first unless it's inappropriate for your hea Continue reading >>

Metformin, Glipizide, Januvia, And Actos Related Questions

Metformin, Glipizide, Januvia, And Actos Related Questions

Metformin, Glipizide, Januvia, and Actos Related Questions Metformin, Glipizide, Januvia, and Actos Related Questions A friend's father (age 70+) is taking all of those drugs, and I wonder if that's a dangerous mix. I read about them today, and it seems Actos is the worst, followed by Glipizide. I also read in an older thread here that it's dangerous to take Actos and Januvia together. Why is that? Is that an unwelcome combination only for causing weight gain? He thinks one of these drugs is raising his cholesterol levels, but I didn't find it mentioned among the side-effects of any of them. I think only Actos could be a potential suspect, although some studies show it may lower cholesterol. What do you think? He is mildly anemic with no apparent reason. I've seen it mentioned many times here that Metformin depletes vitamin B12, but his B12 is within the lab ranges. I don't really trust many of those ranges, so I think he could still be B12 deficient with a result of 432 (211 - 946). Need to ask if he is supplementing with B12. Continue reading >>

Efficacy And Safety Of Pioglitazone Versus Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Double-blind, Randomized Trial.

Efficacy And Safety Of Pioglitazone Versus Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Double-blind, Randomized Trial.

Efficacy and safety of pioglitazone versus metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a double-blind, randomized trial. Department of Medicine I, Rudolfstiftung Hospital, A-1030 Vienna, Austria. [email protected] J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2004 Dec;89(12):6068-76. Pioglitazone increases the insulin sensitivity of peripheral tissues and may provide an alternative first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes. This study compared metabolic control in drug-naive type 2 diabetes patients given either pioglitazone or metformin. Eleven hundred and ninety-nine patients with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus [glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), 7.5-11%; normal, 4.3-6.1%] were randomized to receive either pioglitazone (< or =45 mg/d) or metformin (< or =850 mg, three times daily). HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin levels, total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, free fatty acids, and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio were measured. Mean HbA1c decreased in both treatment groups from baseline to wk 52 (-1.4% and -1.5%). Significantly greater mean reductions in FPG were observed in the pioglitazone group (-45.0 mg/dl; -2.5 mmol/liter) than in the metformin (-39.6 mg/dl; -2.2 mmol/liter) group (P = 0.016). Favorable changes in triglycerides and HDL-C were more pronounced with pioglitazone. Although low density lipoprotein cholesterol and TC levels increased with pioglitazone, TC/HDL-C ratios decreased similarly with both treatments. The urinary albumin/creatinine ratio was reduced by 19% with pioglitazone treatment, but remained unchanged with metformin therapy (-1%; P = 0.002). There was an increase in body weight of 1.9 kg in the pioglitazone group and a decrease of 2 Continue reading >>

Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met Xr (metformin And Pioglitazone) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met Xr (metformin And Pioglitazone) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

oval, white, imprinted with 4833M, 15/850 What are the possible side effects of metformin and pioglitazone (Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR)? This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness , or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effects, such as: stomach pain, blood in your urine, painful urination; feeling short of breath, especially when lying down; pale skin, feeling light-headed, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating; sudden unusual pain in your hand, arm, or foot; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever , loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). sneezing, runny nose, cough or other signs of a cold. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about metformin and pioglitazone (Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Glucophage) or pioglitazone (Actos), or if you have kidney problems, severe heart failure, active bladder cancer , or metabolic acidosis. Do not use metformin and pioglitazone if you are in a state o Continue reading >>

Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met Xr Drug Imprint

Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met Xr Drug Imprint

(pioglitazone and metformin hydrochloride) Tablets CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE AND LACTIC ACIDOSIS Thiazolidinediones, including pioglitazone, which is a component of ACTOPLUS MET, cause or exacerbate congestive heart failure in some patients [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. After initiation of ACTOPLUS MET, and after dose increases, monitor patients carefully for signs and symptoms of heart failure (e.g., excessive, rapid weight gain, dyspnea, and/or edema). If heart failure develops, it should be managed according to current standards of care and discontinuation or dose reduction of ACTOPLUS MET must be considered [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. ACTOPLUS MET is not recommended in patients with symptomatic heart failure. Initiation of ACTOPLUS MET in patients with established New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III or IV heart failure is contraindicated [see CONTRAINDICATIONS and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious complication that can occur due to metformin accumulation. The risk increases with conditions such as sepsis, dehydration, excess alcohol intake, hepatic impairment, renal impairment, and acute congestive heart failure [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. The onset is often subtle, accompanied only by nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgias, respiratory distress, increasing somnolence, and nonspecific abdominal distress. Laboratory abnormalities include low pH, increased anion gap, and elevated blood lactate [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. If acidosis is suspected, ACTOPLUS MET should be discontinued and the patient hospitalized immediately [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. ACTOPLUS MET tablets are a thiazolidinediones andbiguanide combination product that contains two oral antidiabetic medications:pioglitazone hydrochlori Continue reading >>

Actos And Metformin Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Actos And Metformin Drug Interactions - Drugs.com

Do not stop taking any medications without consulting your healthcare provider. Disclaimer: Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Multum is accurate, up-to-date and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. In addition, the drug information contained herein may be time sensitive and should not be utilized as a reference resource beyond the date hereof. This material does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients, or recommend therapy. Multum's information is a reference resource designed as supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge, and judgement of healthcare practitioners in patient care. The absence of a warning for a given drug or combination thereof in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for any given patient. Multum Information Services, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. Copyright 2000-2018 Multum Information Services, Inc. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. Some mixtures of medications can lead to serious and even fatal consequences. Continue reading >>

Actos For Type 2 Diabetes - Actos Full Prescribing Information

Actos For Type 2 Diabetes - Actos Full Prescribing Information

Actos for Type 2 Diabetes - Actos Full Prescribing Information Actos, pioglitazone hcl, patient information (in plain English) Thiazolidinediones, including Actos, cause or exacerbate congestive heart failure in some patients (see WARNINGS ). After initiation of Actos, and after dose increases, observe patients carefully for signs and symptoms of heart failure (including excessive, rapid weight gain, dyspnea, and/or edema). If these signs and symptoms develop, the heart failure should be managed according to the current standards of care. Furthermore, discontinuation or dose reduction of Actos must be considered. Actos is not recommended in patients with symptomatic heart failure. Initiation of Actos in patients with established NYHA Class III or IV heart failure is contraindicated (see CONTRAINDICATIONS and WARNINGS ). Actos (pioglitazone hydrochloride) is an oral antidiabetic agent that acts primarily by decreasing insulin resistance. Actos is used in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus [NIDDM] or adult-onset diabetes). Pharmacological studies indicate that Actos improves sensitivity to insulin in muscle and adipose tissue and inhibits hepatic gluconeogenesis. Actos improves glycemic control while reducing circulating insulin levels. Pioglitazone [( )-5-[[4-[2-(5-ethyl-2-pyridinyl)ethoxy]phenyl]methyl]-2,4-] thiazolidinedione monohydrochloride belongs to a different chemical class and has a different pharmacological action than the sulfonylureas, metformin, or the -glucosidase inhibitors. The molecule contains one asymmetric carbon, and the compound is synthesized and used as the racemic mixture. The two enantiomers of pioglitazone interconvert in vivo. No differences were found in the pharmacologic activi Continue reading >>

Switching Diabetes Patients From Avandia To Actos

Switching Diabetes Patients From Avandia To Actos

Switching diabetes patients from Avandia to Actos I have a lot of diabetes patients and have been an avid user of the thiazolidinediones (TZD) class. There are many reasons to like the TZDs: The older, generic medicines like metformin and sulfonylureas are known to fail over time. After 3 years, most patients on one of these drugs lose control of their blood sugar. In contrast, patients on TZDs maintain glycemic control (at least up to 4-5 years which was shown in the ADOPT study). The TZDs dont cause hypoglycemia, which is a really bad side effect of insulin and the sulfonylureas. Many diabetic patients need more than one drug, so even if you start with metformin, you are going to have to choose between a TZD (well studied, no hypoglycemia), a sulfonylurea (well studied, causes hypoglycemia), or a DDP4 inbitor like Januvia/Ongyza (not as well studied, no hypoglycemia). TZDs have other benefits that the other diabetes drugs dont, such as improving good cholesterol or HDL, and decreasing triglycerides or fats. In his presentation the Periscope study, which showed Actos prevented plaque build up, Dr. Nissen compared these results to other similar cholesterol lowering studies and showed an LDL-independent effect of the TZDs in their ability to prevent plaque build up. He believed this was due primarily to increases in HDL. Using a TZD, likely because of sustained glycemic control, prevents the need for insulin. This was shown in the recently maligned RECORD study and the NIH sponsored BARI-2D study. Insulin causes hypoglycemia and most of my patients would like to avoid insulin. The first patient contacted me by email related what he had heard about the FDA panels finding. He understood that they recommended not to pull the drug, but also felt that there were enough conce Continue reading >>

Pioglitazone/metformin

Pioglitazone/metformin

Pioglitazone/metformin (also known by the brand names Actoplus Met, Piomet and Politor) is combination of two oral diabetes medications pioglitazone and metformin. The two oral antihyperglycemic agents with different mechanisms of action are used to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Mechanisms[edit] Pioglitazone is a member of the thiazolidinedione class, it decreases insulin resistance in the periphery and in the liver resulting in increased insulin dependent glucose disposal and decreased hepatic glucose output. Metformin is a member of the biguanide class, improves glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes, lowering both basal and postprandial plasma glucose. Metformin decreases hepatic glucose production, decreases intestinal absorption of glucose and improves insulin sensitivity by increasing peripheral glucose uptake and utilization. Indication[edit] Pioglitazone/metformin is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise: To improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes, or For patients who are already treated with a separate combination of pioglitazone and metformin, For patients whose diabetes is not adequately controlled with metformin alone, or For patients who have initially responded to pioglitazone alone and require additional glycemic control. Dosage and administration[edit] Recommended dose[edit] Use of antihyperglycemic agents in the management of type 2 diabetes should be individualized on the basis of effectiveness and tolerability. Pioglitazone/metformin should be given with meals; the initial starting dose is either the 15 mg/500 mg or 15 mg/850 mg tablet strength once or twice daily, and gradually titrated after assessing adequacy of therapeutic response, while not exceeding the maximum recommend Continue reading >>

Are Your Meds Making You Fat?

Are Your Meds Making You Fat?

One of the frustrations of diabetes is the way everyone tells you to lose weight. Then they give you medicine that makes you gain weight. Some of the worst offenders are insulin and the thiazolidinedione drugs, pioglitazone (brand name Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia). Why do these drugs cause weight gain, and what can you do about it? To recap: As you know, Type 2 diabetes is a disease of insulin resistance. Your muscle and brain cells don’t want the glucose that the insulin is trying to bring, so they resist. The glucose stays in the bloodstream. At first, the beta cells in the pancreas try to compensate by pumping out extra insulin to overcome the resistance. When the beta cells can’t keep up, or when the resistance gets too severe, you start running high blood sugar and developing symptoms of diabetes. When Insulin is Low People with Type 1 diabetes don’t make enough insulin, period, and people with Type 2 develop a low-insulin situation over time. What does that do to you? With insufficient insulin, glucose can’t get into your muscle and brain cells to be burned as fuel. It can’t get into the liver to be stored as starch, and it can’t get converted into fat. Why not? Because insulin does all those things. So, when you don’t have enough insulin, you won’t gain weight, because your body can’t do anything with the glucose, and you wind up urinating it away. That’s why weight loss is a classic symptom of Type 1. Then You Inject Now this is the tricky part—if you have Type 2, and you are given insulin, the fat storage will resume full speed. Insulin resistance doesn’t affect fat storage. But because of insulin resistance, you will get only a partial improvement in glucose uptake by your muscle and brain cells. So the glucose starts to get store Continue reading >>

Actos (pioglitazone Hydrochloride): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

Actos (pioglitazone Hydrochloride): Side Effects, Interactions, Warning, Dosage & Uses

Thiazolidinediones, including ACTOS, cause or exacerbate congestive heartfailure in some patients [see WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. After initiation of ACTOS, and after dose increases, monitor patients carefully for signs and symptoms of heart failure (e.g., excessive, rapid weight gain, dyspnea, and/or edema). If heart failure develops, it should be managed according to current standards of care and discontinuation or dose reduction of ACTOS must be considered. ACTOS is not recommended in patients with symptomatic heart failure. Initiation of ACTOS in patients with established New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class III or IV heart failure is contraindicated [see CONTRAINDICATIONS and WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS ]. ACTOS tablets are a thiazolidinedione and an agonist for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ( PPAR ) gamma that contains an oral antidiabetic medication: pioglitazone. Pioglitazone [()-5-[[4-[2-(5-ethyl-2-pyridinyl) ethoxy] phenyl] methyl]-2,4-] thiazolidinedione monohydrochloride contains one asymmetric carbon, and the compound is synthesized and used as the racemic mixture. The two enantiomers of pioglitazone interconvert in vivo. No differences were found in the pharmacologic activity between the two enantiomers. The structural formula is as shown: Pioglitazone hydrochloride is an odorless white crystalline powder that has a molecular formula of C19H20N2O3SHCl and a molecular weight of 392.90 daltons. It is soluble in N,Ndimethylformamide,slightly soluble in anhydrous ethanol , very slightly soluble in acetone and acetonitrile, practically insoluble in water, and insoluble in ether. ACTOS is available as a tablet for oral administration containing 15 mg, 30 mg, or 45 mg of pioglitazone (as the base) formulated with the following excipients: lactose m Continue reading >>

Actos, Invokana, Metformin: What Type 2 Diabetes Drug's Right For You?

Actos, Invokana, Metformin: What Type 2 Diabetes Drug's Right For You?

Type 2 diabetes is debilitating for many, ushering in a world of needles, side effects and medications. Since insulin resistance causes excess glucose to build up in your blood, most diabetes medications combat this issue. The most popular type 2 diabetes drugs are Invokana (canagliflozin), Metformin (Glucophage) and Actos (pioglitazone). Each medication uses a different mechanism to help regulate blood sugar. However, some blood sugar drugs have serious side effects that worsen over time. Among Metformin, Invokana and Actos, which type 2 diabetes drug is right for you? There are many different type 2 diabetes medications, but these three are the most popular and commonly prescribed. New American College of Physicians (ACP) guidelines recommend Metformin for managing diabetes symptoms. This endorsements backed by data from the latest diabetes studies. The ACP also recommends combining Metformin with other drugs to manage type 2 diabetes, if necessary. Metformin, unless contraindicated, is an effective treatment strategy because it has better effectiveness, is associated with fewer adverse effects, and is cheaper than most other oral medications, said ACP president Dr. Nitin Damle. Dr. Damle adds that while U.S. obesity rates escalate, so too does type 2 diabetes prevalence. Metformin has the added benefit of being associated with weight loss, explains Dr. Damle. Metformin comes highly recommended by physicians nationwide and is the cheapest, most effective type 2 diabetes drug available. Invokana works with your kidneys to help you eliminate excess blood sugar through urination. This helps decrease blood sugar levels without increasing your likelihood of gaining weight, provided youre getting proper nutrition and exercise. One Invokana benefit is its higher association Continue reading >>

Actos (pioglitazone)

Actos (pioglitazone)

On April 8, 2014, Takeda were fined $6bn for destroying thousands of documents relating to health data about Actos . Takeda's partner, the pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly, has been fined $3 billion for its part in the cover up. Pioglitazone works by making cells more sensitive to insulin, which is used to regulate the level of glucose in the body. Improving insulin sensitivity (or reducing insulin resistance) makes it easier for sugar (glucose) in the blood to get into the cells. Actos is intended for adults with type 2 diabetes - particularly overweight diabetic patients - who are unable to control their blood sugar levels through diet and exercise alone or the use of metformin and/or a sulphonylurea. It is designed to be used alongside a healthy, balanced diet and regular physical activity. In the UK it is available as a standalone treatment (monotherapy), a dual-oral therapy in combination with metformin, or a triple-oral therapy in combination with metformin and a sulphonylurea. Actos may also be used in combination with insulin for type 2 diabetics who are unable to control their blood sugars on insulin alone or cannot tolerate meformin. Actos should never be used by diabetic patients who: are allergic or sensitive to any of the ingredients in the medicine or other thiazolidinediones have a heart condition, such as heart attack, or a history of heart problems have bladder cancer or history of bladder cancer It is also important to note that Actos is ineffective and possibly harmful in type 1 diabetes . Actos is administered orally with or without food. The drug is available in 15 mg, 30mg and 45mg tablet doses. The correct dosage set by your prescriber is printed on the pharmacy label, along with instructions on how often take your medicine. You should not change Continue reading >>

Is Actos Safe?

Is Actos Safe?

Q. I recently saw an ad for a lawsuit involving the diabetes drug Actos. Is it safe for me to continue taking it? A. That all depends. Pioglitazone (Actos) and a similar drug, rosiglitazone (Avandia), are in a class of medications known as thiazolidinediones, which are used to treat type 2 diabetes. In August 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first generic versions of pioglitazone. Sign up for the AARP Health Newsletter. Thiazolidinediones — whether used alone or in combination with other antidiabetic agents — can cause or worsen congestive heart failure. For that reason, people with heart failure should not use them, and those with risk factors for heart failure — such as high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, a history of heart attack or irregular heartbeats — should use them with caution. Both Actos and its generic equivalent are labeled with a "black box" safety warning to that effect. The drugs also carry a warning of a possible increased risk of bladder cancer based on the FDA's analysis of five-year results from an ongoing, 10-year study in California. While the analysis found no overall increased risk of bladder cancer associated with the use of pioglitazone, it did find a slightly increased risk among patients with the longest exposure to — and highest cumulative doses of — the drug. So if you have a history of bladder cancer, or have other risk factors for bladder cancer, you also may want to avoid the drugs. Still, pioglitazone works so well in older patients that, in my judgment, the benefits outweigh the possible risks for most people. For the reasons mentioned above, if you take pioglitazone, you and your doctor or other health professional should carefully watch for signs or symptoms of heart failure. These Continue reading >>

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