diabetestalk.net

What Is The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease?

The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two out of three people with diabetes will die of heart disease or stroke. Diabetes can have no symptoms and go undetected for years. The National Diabetes Education Program estimates that up to 50 percent of people with diabetes don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two out of three people with diabetes will die of heart disease or stroke. Why is diabetes a risk factor for heart disease and stroke? Diabetes contributes to heart disease in various ways, including the following four connections. 1. In time, too much glucose (or sugar) in the blood damages nerves and blood vessels. Continued high blood glucose levels prevent vessels from relaxing and dilating normally. This causes narrowing of the arteries and increases the likelihood of high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. In fact, people with diabetes are twice as likely to have high blood pressure. Vessel damage can wreak havoc on different parts of the body. It may lead to poor circulation, increasing the risk for infections and amputations. It can affect vessels to the eyes, eventually causing blindness. If the blood vessels to the kidneys are damaged, kidney failure is likely. Damage to heart vessels can trigger a heart attack; brain vessel damage can lead to a stroke. 2. Diabetes causes a chronic low level of inflammation to settle in the arteries, making them more susceptible to plaque buildup. Too much glucose in the Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Autoimmunity And The Heart

The Connection Between Diabetes, Autoimmunity And The Heart

Heart disease prevention for diabetics February is all about the heart. But I’m not talking about Valentine’s Day with all the love notes, chocolates, and flowers. I’m talking about February as American Heart Month, and the actual heart that is beating in your chest right now. We all need to be a little more mindful of our heart because – while it gives us life, if we don’t take care of it – it can lead to some extremely serious health issues. With that in mind, let’s take the opportunity this American Heart Month to bring attention to some lesser-known facts about heart disease and its indirect link to autoimmune disease. Heart disease has maintained its ranking as the leading cause of death in the United States for the past several decades. While we often associate high cholesterol, obesity, high blood pressure and smoking as some of the most common factors leading to cardiovascular complications, there are actually hundreds of varying risk factors that can lead to heart disease, including an entirely different disease: diabetes. Over the years, medical research has linked several diseases as being immune-mediated long after after the original discovery of such diseases; one prime example is diabetes. And, while this discovery was made nearly 40 years ago, many people are still unaware that all types of diabetes can have an autoimmune component. With that in mind, and as we make our way from diabetes to autoimmunity to heart health, let’s examine how diabetes is linked to heart disease. Caused by a hardening of the arteries or a blocking of the blood vessels that go to your heart, people with diabetes are more than twice as likely to suffer a heart attack than those without. In fact, two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or strok Continue reading >>

Diabetic Heart Disease

Diabetic Heart Disease

If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes you have an increased risk for heart disease. Diabetic heart disease can be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra weight around the waist Abnormal cholesterol levels High blood pressure Smoking Some people who have diabetic heart disease have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. Others have some or all of the symptoms of heart disease. Treatments include medications to treat heart damage or to lower your blood glucose (blood sugar), blood pressure, and cholesterol. If you are not already taking a low dose of aspirin every day, your doctor may suggest it. You also may need surgery or some other medical procedure. Lifestyle changes also help. These include a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, and quitting smoking. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The Diabetes-heart Disease Connection And What It Means For You

The diabetes–heart disease connection and what it means for you Understand the interactions between these two conditions. Photo: Thinkstock Exercise and a heart-healty diet lowers risks from both heart disease and diabetes. Decades ago, data from the historic Framingham Heart Study revealed that having diabetes significantly increases your risk of developing cardiovascular disease. In the intervening years, scientists have learned more about how the two deadly diseases interact. But the magnitude of the problem has expanded as well. Currently, two-thirds of people with diabetes eventually die of heart disease or stroke. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

By By Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center A strong link between diabetes and heart disease is now well established. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center several years ago showed a two- to threefold increase in the incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared with those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack or stroke is by far the leading cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in the treatment of heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so has the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival has been less than half as much as in the general population. Why Is Heart Disease So Common in People With Diabetes? Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease; however, a variety of mechanisms—not solely blood glucose levels—most likely come into play. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to other well-established risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and more than 90% of patients with diabetes have one or more of these additional risk factors. Some of the increased susceptibility to blood vessel damage that people with diabe Continue reading >>

Q&a: What's The Link Between Diabetes And Your Heart?

Q&a: What's The Link Between Diabetes And Your Heart?

Q: What is the connection between diabetes and heart and blood vessel diseases? A: The connection is huge. It is said that diabetes is a cardiovascular disease. But lots of people haven’t realized it yet. They worry more about diabetes affecting their eyesight and kidneys. Yes, that can happen. But the fact is that people with diabetes suffer and die much more from heart and blood vessel disease. That’s the real issue. This is the key reason there’s been a big change in the focus of diabetes management. It’s no longer just about glucose control. It’s at least — if not more — important for people to focus on controlling blood pressure and blood lipids, particularly LDL cholesterol. By the time someone gets diagnosed with diabetes, he or she may have already been living with serious risk factors for heart and blood vessel disease for years. Join the conversation and share this story Continue reading >>

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

“St. Luke’s University Health Network is proud to continue our mission of improving patient education and care by collaborating with Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly on this important initiative to encourage people with type 2 diabetes to learn more about their heart disease risk,” said Dr. Bankim Bhatt, St. Luke’s Chief of Endocrinology. “By providing relevant, educational resources about the connection between type 2 diabetes and heart disease to our community, we hope to empower people with type 2 diabetes and their loved ones to speak with their healthcare providers and to take action.” For Your SweetHeart launched in November 2016 following a survey that found more than half (52 percent) of adults with type 2 diabetes do not understand they are at an increased risk for heart disease and related life-threatening events, like heart attack, stroke or even death. Due to the complications associated with diabetes, such as high blood sugar, high blood pressure and obesity, cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease, is a major complication and the leading cause of death associated with diabetes. Ten leading patient and professional advocacy organizations and a steering committee of eight leading medical experts (cardiologists, endocrinologists and primary care physicians) have also joined the For Your SweetHeart movement to further educate their communities about the link between type 2 diabetes and heart disease. St. Luke’s University Health Network – a non-profit, regional, fully integrated, nationally recognized network providing services at seven hospitals and more than 200 sites in counties throughout Pennsylvania and New Jersey – encourages people with type 2 diabetes to assess their risk through the Heart You Quiz and other resources avai Continue reading >>

Error Loading Player: No Playable Sources Found

Error Loading Player: No Playable Sources Found

Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, but the number-one cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is actually heart disease. Heart disease and diabetes often occur together, and the link between them is high blood sugar. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In fact, the CDC reports heart disease is responsible for one of every four deaths. For this reason, it’s essential for anyone with type 2 diabetes to understand the link between heart disease and diabetes and take proper preventative measures to manage or reverse their diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, you probably already know about insulin resistance. Because the body does not use insulin properly, the pancreas tries to compensate by making extra insulin. Over time, it can’t keep up, and the body cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels. (Find out more information about insulin resistance here.) Those high glucose levels can harden arteries over time. Your arteries need to be spacious and flexible to get proper blood and oxygen circulation throughout the body; tight and rigid arteries force the heart to work harder to pump the blood around. This leads to heart disease. Additionally, people with type 2 diabetes may follow certain lifestyles that can trigger heart disease. The same diet and habits that lead to type 2 diabetes can also lead to heart disease because of their connection to high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And it doesn’t stop there: Those same problems can lead to other conditions, such as erectile dysfunction or stroke. The good news: Both type 2 diabetes and heart disease can be prevented or managed by lifestyle choices. Lean proteins and heart-healthy meals can help keep cholesterol levels low, and ample research supports eating a vegetarian Continue reading >>

Health Talk: The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Health Talk: The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Heart health should always be a concern, but for people with diabetes, it is extremely important. Diabetes is a disorder in which your body doesn’t produce or process insulin correctly and is often directly connected to cardiovascular disease. In fact, a person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without this condition. Also there are several other factors to consider: • A diabetic who has had a previous heart attack has a much greater risk of having another. • Diabetics develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. • Diabetics who have heart attacks are more apt to die as a result. The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood glucose (sugar) levels. With time, the high glucose in the bloodstream damages the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Even though the statistics may point to an increased risk of developing heart disease if you have diabetes, there’s a lot you can do in terms of prevention: • Be active. Aim for about 30 minutes of exercise most days. That can be broken down into 10-minute increments and still give you all the heart benefits. • Consider low-dose aspirin. Talk to your doctor about whether you should take a low dose of aspirin every day, which may reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, there are risks, and aspirin therapy is not for everyone. • Eat a heart-healthy diet. Reduce consumption of high-fat and cholesterol-laden foods such as fried foods and eggs, and eat more high-fiber foods, including whole grains, vegetables, and fruits. Try to limit prepared sn Continue reading >>

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Understanding The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month, an opportunity to recognize one of the most serious, complex and growing public health burdens worldwide – and its link to cardiovascular disease. In 2017, 425 million people worldwide have diabetes, and this number is expected to rise to 629 million by 2045 – meaning an astounding one in 10 adults will be living with the disease. In the U.S., diabetes impacts approximately 30 million people, and it was the seventh leading cause of death in 2015. Diabetes is a chronic and generally progressive disease that is characterized by high blood sugar levels, and without appropriate management, can lead to serious complications including kidney problems, blindness and amputation. In the U.S., about one third of adults with diabetes are not currently at their blood sugar goal, a reminder of the tremendous need for new therapeutic options to help those with diabetes to better manage their condition, as well as support and education to help them manage their treatment regimen. One of the biggest threats for people living with diabetes is cardiovascular disease. Diabetes itself is a risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease, and its complications, including heart attack and stroke, remain the number one cause of death in people with diabetes. Furthermore, adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. Additional research in this area is critical in order to reduce this burden, advance patient care and improve outcomes. In our early discovery efforts, Pfizer is focused on emerging areas of research in metabolic disorders, including metabolic-related cardiovascular complications, energy balance in chronic disease, type 2 diabetes/hyperinsulinemia and non-alcoholic Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart disease is common in people with diabetes. Data from the National Heart Association from 2012 shows 65% of people with diabetes will die from some sort of heart disease or stroke. In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the condition is more common in those with type 2 diabetes. In fact, heart disease is the number one cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes. The Framingham Study was one of the first pieces of evidence to show that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to heart disease than those people who did not have diabetes. The Framingham Study looked at generations of people, including those with diabetes, to try to determine the health risk factors for developing heart disease. It showed that multiple health factors -- including diabetes -- could increase the possibility of developing heart disease. Aside from diabetes, other health problems associated with heart disease include high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of early heart disease. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is 2 to 4 times higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. For example, one medical study found that people with d Continue reading >>

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

– a nationwide movement to raise awareness of the critical connection between type 2 diabetes and heart disease – to over 200 facilities and 60,000 people served by the organization annually. “St. Luke’s University Health Network is proud to continue our mission of improving patient education and care by collaborating with Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly on this important initiative to encourage people with type 2 diabetes to learn more about their heart disease risk,” said Dr. Bankim Bhatt, St. Luke’s Chief of Endocrinology. “By providing relevant, educational resources about the connection between type 2 diabetes and heart disease to our community, we hope to empower people with type 2 diabetes and their loved ones to speak with their healthcare providers and to take action.” For Your SweetHeart launched in November 2016 following a survey that found more than half (52 percent) of adults with type 2 diabetes do not understand they are at an increased risk for heart disease and related life-threatening events, like heart attack, stroke or even death. Due to the complications associated with diabetes, such as high blood sugar, high blood pressure and obesity, cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease, is a major complication and the leading cause of death associated with diabetes. Ten leading patient and professional advocacy organizations and a steering committee of eight leading medical experts (cardiologists, endocrinologists and primary care physicians) have also joined the For Your SweetHeart movement to further educate their communities about the link between type 2 diabetes and heart disease. St. Luke’s University Health Network – a non-profit, regional, fully integrated, nationally recognized network providing services at seven hosp Continue reading >>

Take Diabetes To Heart: The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Heart Disease

Take Diabetes To Heart: The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Heart Disease

People living with diabetes have a higher chance of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other coronary complications. The best chance of preventing CVD is to take diabetes to heart and understand the connection between your blood sugar levels and the warning signs of heart disease. See how you can take steps to keep your ticker tocking and have yet another vital reason for better managing diabetes. Understand the risk. Heart disease is a major complication of living with diabetes. According to the National Diabetes Education Program, the chance of developing heart disease or having a stroke is between two to four times greater in adults with diabetes.[1] The symptoms of CVD are not always as obvious as other complications, like increased risk of skin infection, but the risk is real. Since diabetes can interfere with nerves and diminish pain signals, someone with diabetes may not experience the usual warning signs of a heart attack.[2] Having diabetes is in itself a risk factor for heart disease, but there are other risk factors that you can have some control over to decrease your chance of heart attack or stroke. Smoking. Seriously?!? Are you still doing this? Smoking elevates the likelihood of heart disease, not to mention that it increases the risk of diabetic retinopathy and damages blood vessels which can lead to amputations. Find help to quit the smoking habit. High Blood Pressure. If your blood pressure is on the high side, it can cause strain on your heart and blood vessels as your body must work harder to pump the blood. Reducing your intake of sodium and finding ways to keep stress low can help lower blood pressure. High Cholesterol. High LDL cholesterol collects in your blood vessels, which overtimes narrows and hardens your arteries, blocking blood fl Continue reading >>

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Scrutinized

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Scrutinized

The link between diabetes and heart disease is well-known -- diabetics are two to four times more likely to have cardiovascular disease than nondiabetics, and two-thirds will die of an early heart attack or stroke. But the link itself is poorly understood. "A person with diabetes and no cardiovascular history has the same risk of having a heart attack as a person who has had a prior heart attack," said Dr. Ruchi Mathur, an endocrinologist at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Now researchers are attempting to figure out both the precise connection and what it means for treatment. "We need to understand why there is this risk because it has profound implications for therapy," said Dr. Jorge Plutzky, director of the vascular disease prevention program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "You should conceivably treat every patient with diabetes as aggressively as a heart attack survivor." That means going beyond the traditional focus on dramatically lowering blood sugar levels. Patients should also minimize a cluster of other risk factors that are common to both diabetes and cardiovascular disease: obesity, hypertension, unhealthy cholesterol profiles and, recent research indicates, inflammation. It also means that doctors should screen patients with heart disease for diabetes, and visa versa. By learning more about the mechanisms through which diabetes damages the heart, scientists may be able to interrupt or forestall the injury, extending patients' life span and improving their quality of life along the way. "People always think of diabetes as a sugar problem because it is diagnosed based on the amount of glucose in the blood," said Dr. Richard Nesto, chairman of the cardiology department at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass. "However, we now recogniz Continue reading >>

Diabetes Dilemma: The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes Dilemma: The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

I like knowing why things are the way they are. Understanding the underlying causes of heart problems and treating them is one of the reasons I love working in cardiology. Sometimes the causes are obvious. Sometimes they’re not. For many people, the connection between diabetes and heart disease falls into the latter category. In fact, my wife and I talked about that just the other day over breakfast. She pointed out that people might take better care of themselves if they understood how the two conditions are connected. And I agree! The heart risks of diabetes If you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, you’re more likely to develop heart disease than someone who doesn’t have diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than adults who don’t have diabetes. There are a few reasons for this higher risk in diabetes patients: Fluctuating levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which can damage the interior surfaces of blood vessels Potentially higher levels of lipids, or fats, in the blood, including high cholesterol levels (a condition known as diabetic dyslipidemia, which is associated with heart disease) A wide range of reactions specific to their type of diabetes, including elevated hormones and cytokines (proteins that cells use to communicate and carry out vital functions) These factors often result in accelerated atherosclerosis, or thickening of the walls of the arteries. But these aren’t the only ways patients with diabetes may be at greater risk for heart disease. Obesity, which often is a problem for patients with Type 2 diabetes, only makes these issues worse. Obese patients are more likely to have high blood pressure on top of their elevated ri Continue reading >>

More in diabetes