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What Is The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Uncovering The Genetic Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Uncovering The Genetic Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Type-2 diabetes (TD2) is a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), and these two common conditions are leading causes of disease and death globally. But the biological pathways that explain the connection between them have remained somewhat murky, as have the causes of T2D. In a large analysis of genetic data, an international team led by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine sought answers about what causes T2D and clarified how the two diseases are linked. The researchers found evidence that, on the whole, the genetic link between the diseases appears to work in one direction: risk genes for T2D are much more likely to be associated with higher CHD risk than the other way around. And there also could be some pathways whereby pharmacological lowering of one disease increases the risk of the other. “Using evidence from human genetics, it should be possible to design drugs for type-2 diabetes that have either beneficial or neutral effects on CHD risk; however it is important to identify and further de-prioritize pathways that decrease the risk of type-2 diabetes but increase the risk of CHD," said co-first author Danish Saleheen, MBBS, PhD. The scientists also found that diabetes-linked gene variants differ in their apparent effects on CHD risk, depending on their mechanisms. Variants that increase the chance of obesity or high blood pressure, for example, appear to boost CHD risk more strongly than do variants that alter insulin or glucose levels. Interestingly, this work identified dual diabetes-CHD risk loci that include targets of some existing drugs such as icosapent--an omega-3 fatty acid component of some fish oils, which lowers cholesterol and is sold in concentrated form as a prescription pharmaceutical. Dr. Saleheen, co-senior autho Continue reading >>

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

Get Unlimited Access On Medscape.

You’ve become the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal of medicine. A must-read every morning. I was an ordinary doctor until I found Medscape. A wonderful resource tool with great updates. ” Continue reading >>

Understanding The Connection Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Understanding The Connection Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

The body is an incredible and complex being, and scientists have come to understand just how interrelated the body’s different functions really are. No illness or condition exists in solitary confinement within the body; each problem has the potential to create other health issues in an unwanted and often rapid domino effect. This pattern is especially prevalent when looking at the connection between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. According to the American Heart Association, at least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes ultimately die from a form of heart disease. That’s nearly three-quarters of all older Americans with diabetes, which is a rate two to four times higher than among adults without diabetes. Based on this strong correlation, the AHA has officially deemed diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Type 2 Diabetes Accelerates Cardiovascular Risk Factors It’s not a mystery why this blatant link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease exists. First, studies have uncovered a positive association between hypertension and the insulin resistance found in type 2 diabetics. Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which means that diabetes can worsen the problem. Furthermore, it’s common for patients with diabetes to have unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which often trigger premature coronary heart disease. Finally, obesity and lack of physical activity are both major risk factors for insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. What Can You Do To Protect Yourself? If you do have diabetes, you aren’t powerless to protect yourself from cardiovascular disease and minimize your chances of a heart attack or stroke. Continue reading >>

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

“St. Luke’s University Health Network is proud to continue our mission of improving patient education and care by collaborating with Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly on this important initiative to encourage people with type 2 diabetes to learn more about their heart disease risk,” said Dr. Bankim Bhatt, St. Luke’s Chief of Endocrinology. “By providing relevant, educational resources about the connection between type 2 diabetes and heart disease to our community, we hope to empower people with type 2 diabetes and their loved ones to speak with their healthcare providers and to take action.” For Your SweetHeart launched in November 2016 following a survey that found more than half (52 percent) of adults with type 2 diabetes do not understand they are at an increased risk for heart disease and related life-threatening events, like heart attack, stroke or even death. Due to the complications associated with diabetes, such as high blood sugar, high blood pressure and obesity, cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease, is a major complication and the leading cause of death associated with diabetes. Ten leading patient and professional advocacy organizations and a steering committee of eight leading medical experts (cardiologists, endocrinologists and primary care physicians) have also joined the For Your SweetHeart movement to further educate their communities about the link between type 2 diabetes and heart disease. St. Luke’s University Health Network – a non-profit, regional, fully integrated, nationally recognized network providing services at seven hospitals and more than 200 sites in counties throughout Pennsylvania and New Jersey – encourages people with type 2 diabetes to assess their risk through the Heart You Quiz and other resources avai Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

Ways for Diabetics to Protect Their Heart Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering regarding heart disease and the diabetes. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over time, high blood glucose levels damage nerves and blood vessels, leading to complications such as heart disease and stroke, the leading causes of death among people with diabetes The Connection Between Heart Disease and Diabetes The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. With time, the high glucose in the bloodstream damages the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. According to the National Institutes of Health, about 65 percent of people with diabetes actually die of heart disease or stroke, and a person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without diabetes. connection. DID YOU KNOW? A person with diabetes who has had one heart attack has a much greater risk of having another. A middle-aged person who has diabetes has the same chance of having a heart attack as someone who is not diabetic, but already had a heart attack. People with diabetes develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. People with diabetes who have heart attacks are more apt to die as a result. People with diabetes have a higher-than-average risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart Disease And Diabetes

Heart disease is common in people with diabetes. Data from the National Heart Association from 2012 shows 65% of people with diabetes will die from some sort of heart disease or stroke. In general, the risk of heart disease death and stroke are twice as high in people with diabetes. While all people with diabetes have an increased chance of developing heart disease, the condition is more common in those with type 2 diabetes. In fact, heart disease is the number one cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes. The Framingham Study was one of the first pieces of evidence to show that people with diabetes are more vulnerable to heart disease than those people who did not have diabetes. The Framingham Study looked at generations of people, including those with diabetes, to try to determine the health risk factors for developing heart disease. It showed that multiple health factors -- including diabetes -- could increase the possibility of developing heart disease. Aside from diabetes, other health problems associated with heart disease include high blood pressure, smoking, high cholesterol levels, and a family history of early heart disease. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is 2 to 4 times higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. For example, one medical study found that people with d Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes & Heart Disease: What's The Connection?

Type 2 Diabetes & Heart Disease: What's The Connection?

Sponsored by Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly and Company Having either type 2 diabetes or heart disease can be a serious threat to your health. But did you know there is a connection between the two? Malcolm tells The Doctors he learned his lesson about the connection before it was too late. When he was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 15 years ago, he was in denial. As a physical education teacher and soccer coach, he felt healthy. When he broke his leg, doctors discovered he had a blocked artery and his heart issue may have been due to his diabetes. At 60, he is dealing with both type 2 diabetes and heart disease. “It’s not always easy to do,” he explains. Cardiologist Dr. Karol Watson and Malcolm join ER physician Dr. Travis Stork, who says that approximately 29 million Americans are living with diabetes and notes that what Malcolm is experiencing is more common than people realize. Dr. Watson explains that people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease than are people without diabetes. Dr. Stork shares the troubling fact that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes and according to a new national survey more than half of adults do not understand they are at an increased risk for heart disease due to their diabetes. Dr. Watson stresses that people with type 2 diabetes must implement and maintain good health habits like proper diet, exercise, monitoring their glucose levels and getting regular checkups. “Since I found out about the connection, between type 2 diabetes and heart disease, I’ve been doing everything I can to make a positive lifestyle change for myself. After all, I’d really like to meet my grandchildren and have a happy life with my family,” Malcolm shares. Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease?

What Is The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease?

If you've been diagnosed with diabetes, you might be wondering about the connection between diabetes and heart disease. In this guide, we've answered some common questions to help you understand how the two are related. What's the one development in diabetes research that people with diabetes should take to heart? There's no objective answer to that. But the experts we talk with probably would point to our growing understanding of free radicals and the damage they can cause to the bloodstream. Ever since the discovery of insulin allowed people with diabetes to live long enough to develop diabetes-related complications, researchers have been trying to tease out the underlying problem that contributes to increased rates of heart disease as well as blood vessel and nerve damage in people with diabetes. Now they know that they can blame much of the damage on unstable, highly reactive atoms or groups of atoms called free radicals. Everyone has free radicals — they're created as a by-product of many bodily processes, including breathing. Because free radicals are missing an electron, they constantly seek to "steal" electrons from normal molecules. When they succeed, they damage the molecules, unleashing a chemical cascade that can harm cells, including those that line arteries and make up nerves. Studies now show that the high blood sugar related to diabetes — especially high blood sugar after meals — triggers excess production of free radicals. This helps explain why so many studies find that people who maintain tight blood-sugar control are less likely to develop diabetes-related complications. While high blood sugar creates excess free radicals, so do blood-sugar swings (one reason to take regular blood sugar readings and not rely on your A1C score alone). Continuous Continue reading >>

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

What Does Diabetes Do To Your Heart Disease Risk?

Many people with diabetes also have heart disease. When you do things to take care of your diabetes, like manage your blood sugar, exercise, and eat a healthy diet, that's also good for your heart. It's important to understand your risk and how you can lower it. Besides diabetes, do you also have: A waist that's larger than 35 inches in women or 40 inches in men? Low levels of "good" ( HDL) cholesterol? High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol or triglycerides (another type of fat in the blood)? Even borderline elevated at 130/85 If you're not sure, your doctor can check all those numbers for you. Also, do you: Smoke? Have a family member with heart disease? Your doctor needs that information to work with you on a plan for better heart health. People with diabetes are at risk for: Coronary artery disease. Your coronary arteries are in your heart. Fatty deposits, called plaques, can narrow them. If plaque suddenly breaks, it can cause a heart attack. Exercise, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking are musts. It could be from coronary artery disease or from the diabetes. It can be dangerous and fatal, so aggressive management and follow up is essential Congestive heart failure. This is an ongoing condition in which the heart loses the ability to pump blood effectively. The main symptoms are shortness of breath when you're moving and leg swelling. Many people have both conditions. If you smoke, it's time to quit. Set a date and talk to your doctor. If you've tried to quit before, it's not too late. Many people try several times before they kick the habit for good. Nearly everyone with diabetes can benefit from getting more exercise. It's good for your heart and helps control your blood sugar. Even brisk walking counts, so you don't need a gym. If you're not active now, let Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

Diabetes And Heart Disease — An Intimate Connection

By By Om P. Ganda, M.D., Director, Lipid Clinic, Joslin Diabetes Center A strong link between diabetes and heart disease is now well established. Studies from Joslin Diabetes Center several years ago showed a two- to threefold increase in the incidence of heart disease in patients with diabetes compared with those without diabetes who were being followed in the Framingham Heart Study. Women with diabetes have an even greater risk of heart disease compared with those of similar age who do not have diabetes. In fact, cardiovascular disease leading to heart attack or stroke is by far the leading cause of death in both men and women with diabetes. Another major component of cardiovascular disease is poor circulation in the legs, which contributes to a greatly increased risk of foot ulcers and amputations. Several advances in the treatment of heart disease over the past two decades have improved the chances of surviving a heart attack or stroke. However, as the incidence of diabetes steadily increases, so has the number of new cases of heart disease and cardiovascular complications. Unfortunately, in patients with diabetes, improvement in survival has been less than half as much as in the general population. Why Is Heart Disease So Common in People With Diabetes? Diabetes by itself is now regarded as the strongest risk factor for heart disease; however, a variety of mechanisms—not solely blood glucose levels—most likely come into play. The blood vessels in patients with diabetes are more susceptible to other well-established risk factors, such as smoking, high cholesterol and high blood pressure, and more than 90% of patients with diabetes have one or more of these additional risk factors. Some of the increased susceptibility to blood vessel damage that people with diabe Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two out of three people with diabetes will die of heart disease or stroke. Diabetes can have no symptoms and go undetected for years. The National Diabetes Education Program estimates that up to 50 percent of people with diabetes don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States and is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. In fact, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two out of three people with diabetes will die of heart disease or stroke. Why is diabetes a risk factor for heart disease and stroke? Diabetes contributes to heart disease in various ways, including the following four connections. 1. In time, too much glucose (or sugar) in the blood damages nerves and blood vessels. Continued high blood glucose levels prevent vessels from relaxing and dilating normally. This causes narrowing of the arteries and increases the likelihood of high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke. In fact, people with diabetes are twice as likely to have high blood pressure. Vessel damage can wreak havoc on different parts of the body. It may lead to poor circulation, increasing the risk for infections and amputations. It can affect vessels to the eyes, eventually causing blindness. If the blood vessels to the kidneys are damaged, kidney failure is likely. Damage to heart vessels can trigger a heart attack; brain vessel damage can lead to a stroke. 2. Diabetes causes a chronic low level of inflammation to settle in the arteries, making them more susceptible to plaque buildup. Too much glucose in the Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

The Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Estimates suggest that 195 million people around the world have diabetes and that this will increase to 330 million or perhaps even 500 million by 2050. As many as 50 percent of all patients with Type 2 diabetes remain undiagnosed for many years because they have no symptoms. Cardiovascular disease is one of the major complications associated with diabetes. More than 50 percent of individuals with diabetes eventually develop coronary heart disease, stroke or cardiovascular disease. Diabetes is an independent risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease with the risk of the disease and its complications increased two to three times compared to non-diabetic individuals. Also, patients with diabetes develop heart disease at a much earlier age. Duration of diabetes increases the risk of heart disease death independent of coexisting risk factors, and because diabetes is undiagnosed in patients for many years, the complication of cardiovascular disease in these patients is more severe. Patients with multiple chronic diseases experience bad health outcomes because of fragmented care as they see various clinicians, receive complex medication regimens, and are often noncompliant. Evidence has shown that early diagnosis and aggressive management of risk factors reduces heart disease complications in diabetic patients. It is important to screen for undiagnosed diabetes in patients with cardiovascular disease, but we have to aggressively treat cardiovascular risk factors in patients with diabetes. So called metabolic syndrome – a combination of increased waist circumference, glucose intolerance, hypertension, low HDL and elevated triglycerides – is a common link between the development of both diabetes and heart disease. Thus, risk factors for heart disease must be eva Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes

Most people living with diabetes are aware that they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. But the statistics can be truly staggering regarding heart disease and the diabetes. The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood sugar levels. With time, the high glucose in the bloodstream damages the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Your risk of heart disease with diabetes is further elevated if you also have a family history of cardiovascular disease or stroke. According to the National Institutes of Health, about 65 percent of people with diabetes actually die of heart disease or stroke, and a person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without diabetes. Manage your Diabetes ABCs Knowing your diabetes ABCs will help lower your chances for heart disease. A is for the A1C test. The A1C test shows your average blood sugar level over the past 3 months. High blood sugar levels can harm your heart and blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes. B is for blood pressure. High blood pressure makes your heart work too hard. It can cause a heart attack, stroke and kidney disease. C is for cholesterol. One kind of cholesterol, called LDL or “bad” cholesterol, can build up and clog your blood vessels. It can cause a heart attack or stroke. Ask your health care team what your cholesterol numbers should be. Sometimes you may need to take medicine to lower your cholesterol and protect your heart. S is for stop smoking. Not smoking is especially important for people with diabetes because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels, so your hear Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes, may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure (hypertension) High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

Health Talk: The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Health Talk: The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Heart health should always be a concern, but for people with diabetes, it is extremely important. Diabetes is a disorder in which your body doesn’t produce or process insulin correctly and is often directly connected to cardiovascular disease. In fact, a person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without this condition. Also there are several other factors to consider: • A diabetic who has had a previous heart attack has a much greater risk of having another. • Diabetics develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. • Diabetics who have heart attacks are more apt to die as a result. The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood glucose (sugar) levels. With time, the high glucose in the bloodstream damages the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Even though the statistics may point to an increased risk of developing heart disease if you have diabetes, there’s a lot you can do in terms of prevention: • Be active. Aim for about 30 minutes of exercise most days. That can be broken down into 10-minute increments and still give you all the heart benefits. • Consider low-dose aspirin. Talk to your doctor about whether you should take a low dose of aspirin every day, which may reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, there are risks, and aspirin therapy is not for everyone. • Eat a heart-healthy diet. Reduce consumption of high-fat and cholesterol-laden foods such as fried foods and eggs, and eat more high-fiber foods, including whole grains, vegetables, and fruits. Try to limit prepared sn Continue reading >>

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