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What Is The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease?

Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Link between Diabetes and Cardiovascular disease 1. Cardiovascular disease is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of early death among people with diabetes—about 65 percent of people with diabetes die from heart disease and stroke. The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. The more health risks factors a person has for heart disease, the higher the chances that they will develop heart disease and even die from it. Just like anyone else, people with diabetes have an increased risk of dying from heart disease if they have more health risk factors. However, the probability of dying from heart disease is dramatically higher in a person with diabetes. So, while a person with one health risk factor, such as high blood pressure, may have a certain chance of dying from heart disease, a person with diabetes has double or even quadruple the risk of dying. 2. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease or suffer a stroke than people without diabetes. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality for people with diabetes. If you have diabetes your risk of cardiovascular disease rises for a number of reasons. Hypertension, abnormal blood lipids and obesity, all risk factors in their own right for cardiovascular disease, occur more frequently in people with diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes causes damage to your body’s blood vessels making them more prone to damage from atherosclerosis and hypertension. People with diabetes develop atherosclerosis at a younger age and more severely than people without diabetes. Hy Continue reading >>

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

3. Diabetes-CVD Facts

  • More than 65% of all deaths in people with diabetes are caused by cardiovascular disease.
  • Heart attacks occur at an earlier age in people with diabetes and often result in premature death.
3 4. Diabetes-CVD Facts
  • Up to 60% of adults with diabetes have high blood pressure.
  • Nearly all adults with diabetes have one or more cholesterol problems, such as:
    • high triglycerides
    • low HDL (“good”) cholesterol
    • high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol
4 5. What is Diabetes ?
  • Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism
  • After digestion, glucose enters the blood stream
  • Then Glucose goes to cell through out the body where it Is used for energy
  • However, a hormone called insulin must be present to allow glucose to entre the cells
  • Insulin is produced by the pancreas, a large gland behind the stomach
6. Continue…
  • In people who do not have diabetes, the pancreas automatically produces the right amount of insulin to move glucose from blood into the cells
  • However, diabetes develops when the pancreas does not make enough insulin , or the cells in muscle,liver,and fats do not use insulin properly, or both.
8. Continue…
  • As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy…………..
9. Complications 10. Complications
  • Over time, high blood glucose levels damage nerves and blood vessels , leading to complications such as heart disease and stroke, the leading causes of death among people with diabetes
Health Talk: The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Health Talk: The Link Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Heart health should always be a concern, but for people with diabetes, it is extremely important. Diabetes is a disorder in which your body doesn’t produce or process insulin correctly and is often directly connected to cardiovascular disease. In fact, a person with diabetes has twice the chance of developing heart disease as someone without this condition. Also there are several other factors to consider: • A diabetic who has had a previous heart attack has a much greater risk of having another. • Diabetics develop cardiovascular disease at a much earlier age than others. • Diabetics who have heart attacks are more apt to die as a result. The connection between diabetes and heart disease starts with high blood glucose (sugar) levels. With time, the high glucose in the bloodstream damages the arteries, causing them to become stiff and hard. Fatty material that builds up on the inside of these blood vessels can eventually block blood flow to the heart or brain, leading to heart attack or stroke. Even though the statistics may point to an increased risk of developing heart disease if you have diabetes, there’s a lot you can do in terms of prevention: • Be active. Aim for about 30 minutes of exercise most days. That can be broken down into 10-minute increments and still give you all the heart benefits. • Consider low-dose aspirin. Talk to your doctor about whether you should take a low dose of aspirin every day, which may reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. However, there are risks, and aspirin therapy is not for everyone. • Eat a heart-healthy diet. Reduce consumption of high-fat and cholesterol-laden foods such as fried foods and eggs, and eat more high-fiber foods, including whole grains, vegetables, and fruits. Try to limit prepared sn Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Online Health Chat with Dr. Leslie Cho and Dr. Vinni Makin Introduction Cleveland_Clinic_Host: People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease at some point in their lives. It is important to control risk factors early on. Join cardiologist Leslie Cho, MD, and endocrinologist, Vinni Makin, MD,online for answers to your questions concerning the link between diabetes and heart disease. Leslie Cho, MD,is Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Women’s Cardiovascular Center. She is also Section Head,Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Cho is board-certified in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular medicine, and internal medicine. Her specialty interests focus on general cardiology, heart disease, and peripheral arterial and vascular disease and their attendant therapies and treatments. Dr. Cho specializes in heart disease in women. A graduate of the University Of Chicago Pritzker School Of Medicine, Dr. Cho completed her residency in internal medicine at University of Washington Medical Center. She completed cardiovascular medicine and interventional cardiology fellowships at Cleveland Clinic. Vinni Makin, MD, is an endocrinologist in Cleveland Clinic’s Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute. She is board certified in endocrinology and internal medicine, and her specialty interests include general endocrinology, diabetes, hirsutism, acne, and thyroid disorders. A graduate of Delhi University’s Lady Hardinge Medical College, Dr. Makin completed her residency in internal medicine at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County in Chicago. She completed her endocrinology fellowship at Cleveland Clinic. Cleveland_Clinic_Host: Welcome to our Online Health Continue reading >>

The Risk Factors For Heart Disease Also Predict Dementia

The Risk Factors For Heart Disease Also Predict Dementia

Lots of research has laid out the ties between the heart and the brain, from how exercise and nutrition affect both organs similarly to how they're similarly affected by stress and depression. And we know that heart disease and brain disease often go hand in hand. But a new study, presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017, finds that one the greatest predictors of dementia down the road is whether one has risk factors for heart disease in the present. In fact, having diabetes in middle age may even rival the gene variant for Alzheimer’s disease in how well it can foretell the onset of dementia in the years to come. “The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said study author Rebecca F. Gottesman in a news release. She and her team at Johns Hopkins University followed over 15,000 people for up to 30 years, beginning the study when they were 45-64 years old. Just over 1,500 people developed dementia over the next few decades, with age being the greatest predictor, as expected. The study also found that certain markers of heart disease were also incredibly strong predictors of brain disease. For instance, people who smoked in middle age had a 41% higher risk of developing dementia than non-smokers. People with high blood pressure had a 39% greater risk of dementia, and those with pre-hypertension (slightly elevated blood pressure) had a 31% higher risk than people with normal blood pressure. But the most startling connection was that people who had full-blown diabetes when they were middle aged had a 77% increased risk of developing dementia down the road. “Diabetes raises the risk almost as much as the most important known genetic risk factor for Al Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Aaron contacted TheDiabetesCouncil with some questions related to diabetes and heart disease. Aaron is 57 years old. He has had Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Aaron visited his doctor related to swelling in his ankles and feet, shortness of breath, and weight gain. After some tests, the doctor informed him that on top of his Type 2 diabetes, he now has congestive heart failure. He was now wondering why did he have heart disease now and was it because of his diabetes? In order to help Aaron and other people with diabetes understand the connection between diabetes and heart disease and how to prevent it, we decided to look into the specific link between the two diseases. What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease? According to the American Heart Association, there exist a relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: 68% percent of people with diabetes who are aged 65 and older die from heart disease and 16% die of a stroke. People with diabetes are more likely to die from a heart disease than those without diabetes. The National Institute of Health states the following for people with diabetes: They have additional causes of heart disease They are at higher risk of heart disease than those who do not have diabetes They may develop heart disease at a younger age Risk assessment must take into account the major risk factors (cigarette smoking, elevated blood pressure, abnormal serum lipids and lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia) and predisposing risk factors (excess body weight and abdominal obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of CVD). Identification of risk factors is a major first step for developing a plan for risk reduction in persons with diabetes. – Scott M. Grundy et al, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease In two words, the conn Continue reading >>

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

St. Luke’s Spotlights Critical Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Heart Disease In Partnership With Boehringer Ingelheim And Eli Lilly And Company

“St. Luke’s University Health Network is proud to continue our mission of improving patient education and care by collaborating with Boehringer Ingelheim and Lilly on this important initiative to encourage people with type 2 diabetes to learn more about their heart disease risk,” said Dr. Bankim Bhatt, St. Luke’s Chief of Endocrinology. “By providing relevant, educational resources about the connection between type 2 diabetes and heart disease to our community, we hope to empower people with type 2 diabetes and their loved ones to speak with their healthcare providers and to take action.” For Your SweetHeart launched in November 2016 following a survey that found more than half (52 percent) of adults with type 2 diabetes do not understand they are at an increased risk for heart disease and related life-threatening events, like heart attack, stroke or even death. Due to the complications associated with diabetes, such as high blood sugar, high blood pressure and obesity, cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease, is a major complication and the leading cause of death associated with diabetes. Ten leading patient and professional advocacy organizations and a steering committee of eight leading medical experts (cardiologists, endocrinologists and primary care physicians) have also joined the For Your SweetHeart movement to further educate their communities about the link between type 2 diabetes and heart disease. St. Luke’s University Health Network – a non-profit, regional, fully integrated, nationally recognized network providing services at seven hospitals and more than 200 sites in counties throughout Pennsylvania and New Jersey – encourages people with type 2 diabetes to assess their risk through the Heart You Quiz and other resources avai Continue reading >>

Biological Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Found

Biological Link Between Diabetes And Heart Disease Found

Researchers from the UC Davis Health System have discovered a biological link between diabetes and heart disease, which may explain why diabetes sufferers have an increased risk for heart disease. This is according to a study published in the journal Nature. The researchers found that when blood sugars are abnormally high (hyperglycemia), this activates a biological pathway that causes irregular heartbeats - a condition called cardiac arrhythmia - that is linked to heart failure and sudden cardiac death. According to the World Heart Federation, people who suffer from diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, compared with people who do not have diabetes. The American Heart Association says that around 65% of diabetes sufferers die from heart disease or stroke, emphasizing the need for new research looking at links between the conditions. For this study, UC Davis researchers, alongside collaborators at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, conducted a series of experiments to determine any biological reasons as to why diabetes sufferers are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease. O-GlcNAc-modified CaMKII a trigger of arrhythmias The experiments involved detailed molecular analysis in rat and human proteins and tissues, calcium imaging in isolated rat cardiac myocytes (cells found in muscle tissues) that were exposed to high glucose, as well looking at whole heart arrhythmias with optical mapping within isolated hearts and live diabetic rates. Their findings showed that moderate to high blood glucose levels, similar to those found in diabetics, triggered a sugar molecule called O-GlcNAc (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) in heart muscle cells to bind to a specific site on a protein called CaMKII (calcium/calmodulin-dependent pr Continue reading >>

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Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, but the number-one cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is actually heart disease. Heart disease and diabetes often occur together, and the link between them is high blood sugar. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. In fact, the CDC reports heart disease is responsible for one of every four deaths. For this reason, it’s essential for anyone with type 2 diabetes to understand the link between heart disease and diabetes and take proper preventative measures to manage or reverse their diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, you probably already know about insulin resistance. Because the body does not use insulin properly, the pancreas tries to compensate by making extra insulin. Over time, it can’t keep up, and the body cannot maintain normal blood glucose levels. (Find out more information about insulin resistance here.) Those high glucose levels can harden arteries over time. Your arteries need to be spacious and flexible to get proper blood and oxygen circulation throughout the body; tight and rigid arteries force the heart to work harder to pump the blood around. This leads to heart disease. Additionally, people with type 2 diabetes may follow certain lifestyles that can trigger heart disease. The same diet and habits that lead to type 2 diabetes can also lead to heart disease because of their connection to high blood pressure and high cholesterol. And it doesn’t stop there: Those same problems can lead to other conditions, such as erectile dysfunction or stroke. The good news: Both type 2 diabetes and heart disease can be prevented or managed by lifestyle choices. Lean proteins and heart-healthy meals can help keep cholesterol levels low, and ample research supports eating a vegetarian Continue reading >>

Understanding The Connection Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

Understanding The Connection Between Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease

The body is an incredible and complex being, and scientists have come to understand just how interrelated the body’s different functions really are. No illness or condition exists in solitary confinement within the body; each problem has the potential to create other health issues in an unwanted and often rapid domino effect. This pattern is especially prevalent when looking at the connection between diabetes and cardiovascular disease. According to the American Heart Association, at least 68 percent of people age 65 or older with diabetes ultimately die from a form of heart disease. That’s nearly three-quarters of all older Americans with diabetes, which is a rate two to four times higher than among adults without diabetes. Based on this strong correlation, the AHA has officially deemed diabetes to be one of the seven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Type 2 Diabetes Accelerates Cardiovascular Risk Factors It’s not a mystery why this blatant link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease exists. First, studies have uncovered a positive association between hypertension and the insulin resistance found in type 2 diabetics. Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, which means that diabetes can worsen the problem. Furthermore, it’s common for patients with diabetes to have unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels, which often trigger premature coronary heart disease. Finally, obesity and lack of physical activity are both major risk factors for insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. What Can You Do To Protect Yourself? If you do have diabetes, you aren’t powerless to protect yourself from cardiovascular disease and minimize your chances of a heart attack or stroke. Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

What Is The Connection Between Heart Disease And Diabetes?

Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to have heart disease than nondiabetic people, and at least 65% of these patients will die from their heart disease. The most important advice for the diabetic patient is to control modifiable risk factors for heart disease with the following actions: Stop smoking. Lower your blood pressure. Control your weight. Exercise. Monitor your blood sugar levels. Diabetes doubles your risks for heart disease and stroke, according to the National Institutes of Health. Having diabetes also means you may develop these problems at a younger age. High blood sugar levels can lead to deposits of fat on the inside of blood vessel walls, increasing your chances of narrowed, hardened and/or clogged blood vessels. If you have diabetes, talk to your doctor about the best ways to lower your risks for heart disease. Continue reading >>

The Diabetes And Heart Disease Connection

The Diabetes And Heart Disease Connection

People who suffer from diabetes are at high risk for heart disease. In a nutshell that’s the diabetes and heart disease connection. I’m sure you’ve heard the children’s song with these cute lyrics: “The foot bone connected to the ankle bone, Ankle bone connected to the leg bone …”* Who would have guessed that your pancreas and heart are connected! If you’re paying attention to your heart health, you’ve probably read and heard a lot about risks for people who have diabetes. That’s because there’s a major connection between the two diseases. If you prefer video, then here you are: According to the American Diabetes Association, people who are diabetic are twice as likely to have heart disease than those who aren’t diabetic. Even more sobering, a diabetic who has a heart attack is also more likely to die from that heart attack. Two out of three adults with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Risk Factors Part of the reason for the diabetes – heart disease connection may be the common traits of people who are diabetic and those at risk for heart disease. For example, many people who are diabetic are overweight, which is a known risk factor for heart disease. Diabetics are also more likely to be sedentary and to have high blood pressure. This combination of risk factors would make anyone at risk for heart disease. What may make diabetes a more special case for cardiac risk is insulin-resistance. Insulin resistance is known to increase triglyceride and LDL levels (the bad cholesterol) and also cause HDL (good cholesterol) to be lower. This can lead to hardening of the arteries. Hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis, is the major contributor to heart disease, heart attacks, and strokes. Therefore people who have diabetes are more likely Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And You

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And You

Diabetes is a common disease that is on the rise in America. Having diabetes raises your risk for developing other dangerous conditions, especially heart disease and stroke. November is National Diabetes Month, a time to raise awareness about preventing and managing diabetes and protecting yourself from its complications. Diabetes is a serious condition that happens when your body can’t make enough of a hormone called insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it has. Insulin helps your body digest sugars that come from what you eat and drink. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood. Over time, that sugar buildup damages your nerves, blood vessels, heart, and kidneys. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, or about 1 of every 11 people. 1 About 8 million of them don’t know they have diabetes. Another 86 million—more than 1 in 3 Americans older than 20 years—have prediabetes, a condition in which a person’s blood sugar is high, but not yet high enough to trigger diabetes.2 Most people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Adults with type 2 diabetes are about twice as likely to die from heart disease as adults who do not have diabetes.3 Surprising Facts About Diabetes Women with diabetes have a 40% greater risk of developing heart disease and a 25% greater risk of stroke than men with diabetes do.5 Experts aren’t sure why the risk is so much greater in women with diabetes than in men with diabetes. Women’s biology may play a role: Women usually have more body fat, which can put them at greater risk for heart disease and stroke. If you are a woman with diabetes, you can take steps to control your condition and improve your chances for avoiding heart disease and stroke (see below). Almost 7 in 10 people with diabetes over age 65 will die o Continue reading >>

Diabetes Dilemma: The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes Dilemma: The Connection Between Diabetes And Heart Disease

I like knowing why things are the way they are. Understanding the underlying causes of heart problems and treating them is one of the reasons I love working in cardiology. Sometimes the causes are obvious. Sometimes they’re not. For many people, the connection between diabetes and heart disease falls into the latter category. In fact, my wife and I talked about that just the other day over breakfast. She pointed out that people might take better care of themselves if they understood how the two conditions are connected. And I agree! The heart risks of diabetes If you have Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, you’re more likely to develop heart disease than someone who doesn’t have diabetes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die of heart disease or have a stroke than adults who don’t have diabetes. There are a few reasons for this higher risk in diabetes patients: Fluctuating levels of blood sugar, or glucose, which can damage the interior surfaces of blood vessels Potentially higher levels of lipids, or fats, in the blood, including high cholesterol levels (a condition known as diabetic dyslipidemia, which is associated with heart disease) A wide range of reactions specific to their type of diabetes, including elevated hormones and cytokines (proteins that cells use to communicate and carry out vital functions) These factors often result in accelerated atherosclerosis, or thickening of the walls of the arteries. But these aren’t the only ways patients with diabetes may be at greater risk for heart disease. Obesity, which often is a problem for patients with Type 2 diabetes, only makes these issues worse. Obese patients are more likely to have high blood pressure on top of their elevated ri Continue reading >>

Diabetic Heart Disease

Diabetic Heart Disease

If you have diabetes or pre-diabetes you have an increased risk for heart disease. Diabetic heart disease can be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra weight around the waist Abnormal cholesterol levels High blood pressure Smoking Some people who have diabetic heart disease have no signs or symptoms of heart disease. Others have some or all of the symptoms of heart disease. Treatments include medications to treat heart damage or to lower your blood glucose (blood sugar), blood pressure, and cholesterol. If you are not already taking a low dose of aspirin every day, your doctor may suggest it. You also may need surgery or some other medical procedure. Lifestyle changes also help. These include a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, being physically active, and quitting smoking. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

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