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What Is The Cheapest Diabetic Test Strips?

Causes Behind The Fluctuating Prices Of Diabetic Test Strips

Causes Behind The Fluctuating Prices Of Diabetic Test Strips

Why are the rates for diabetic test strips constantly changing? Good question. Although every market has its fluctuations, the market for diabetic testing supplies has shown major instability in the recent past. With diabetes becoming so prevalent there is a continually increasing demand for testing supplies. In turn, there should be hundreds of manufacturers competing for market share and thus driving the prices down. Unfortunately, the Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring (BGSM) market is anything but normal. Over the past 20 years, four manufacturers have managed to control over 90% of the BGSM market, those being: Lifescan – One Touch Ultra Blue and Verio Roche – Accu-chek Aviva Plus and Smartview Abbott – Freestyle Lite and Precision Xtra Bayer – Bayer Contour and Contour NEXT With so much market share, these four manufacturers have created an Oligopoly that prevents competition. In other words, prices can be controlled and raised systematically through collusion and lobbying. Big Pharma is not the only culprit. Both the Government and Health Insurance companies also add to the confusion and limited choices. The Competitive Bidding Program was implemented by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) in 2013 forcing suppliers of test strips to compete for Medicare bids. It prevented 90% of suppliers from selling to Medicare. While these suppliers can still sell to Medicare customers, they would not be reimbursed. If you’re looking to restrict access and decrease affordability, that’s how you do it. For more, checkout this blog on the Competitive Bidding Program and it’s impact on diabetes. But it’s the insurance sector causing the most recent fluctuations in the prices of diabetes supplies. Health insurance giants, represented by Pharmacy Benefit Continue reading >>

#pricecheck: When Diabetes Test Strips Are Too Expensive

#pricecheck: When Diabetes Test Strips Are Too Expensive

Through our #PriceCheck project, we're crowdsourcing the cost of common medical procedures and devices. This time around, we're asking about the cost of diabetes test strips. Mark's story Mark Winters, 66, answered our call. A longtime tennis player and writer, Winters has had Type 1 diabetes for more than 60 years. He told me it would be best if he checked his blood sugar four times a day. Instead, he says, he generally tests once in the morning and once at night. He's had diabetes for so long, he says, that he's very good at maintaining his blood sugar through nutrition and exercise. Still, he concedes, "I should test more – but I don't, because I can't afford it." 'Immoral' costs Diabetics can't necessarily just choose the cheapest strip on the market; there are a variety of glucose meters, and each one requires its own specific test strip. Winters buys the Accu-Chek brand of test strips for his Accu-Chek Aviva meter. He's uninsured, and has paid for them out of pocket for years. (That will finally change at the start of 2015, when he'll go on Medicare.) But in recent years, he's struggled to afford his test strips, as the cost has jumped - from roughly 33 cents a strip at Target, to more than a dollar, he says. So he took to the Internet to find a better deal: Boxes of 50 strips for about $31.50 per box, including shipping - a little more than 60 cents per strip. "The situation with the pricing of diabetic necessities has become more than worrisome; gouging for a profit is immoral," Winters wrote in an email to Impatient. He wonders what happens to other people who can't afford to test as often as necessary, and don't manage their condition as meticulously as he does. A larger problem Winters has reason to wonder. I spoke with Kathleen Wall, who was a certified di Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar (glucose) Test Strips

Blood Sugar (glucose) Test Strips

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers some diabetic test supplies, including blood sugar test strips as durable medical equipment (DME). Who's eligible? All people with Part B who have diabetes are covered. Your costs in Original Medicare If your supplier accepts assignment, you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies. Medicare pays for different kinds of DME in different ways. Depending on the type of equipment: You may need to rent the equipment. You may need to buy the equipment. You may be able to choose whether to rent or buy the equipment. Medicare will only cover your DME if your doctors and DME suppliers are enrolled in Medicare. Doctors and suppliers have to meet strict standards to enroll and stay enrolled in Medicare. If your doctors or suppliers aren’t enrolled, Medicare won’t pay the claims submitted by them. It’s also important to ask your suppliers if they participate in Medicare before you get DME. If suppliers are participating suppliers, they must accept assignment. If suppliers are enrolled in Medicare but aren’t “participating,” they may choose not to accept assignment. If suppliers don't accept assignment, there’s no limit on the amount they can charge you. Competitive Bidding Program If you live in or visit certain areas, you may be affected by Medicare's Competitive Bidding Program. In most cases, Medicare will only help pay for these equipment and supplies if they're provided by contract suppliers when both of these apply: Contract suppliers can't charge you more than the 20% coinsurance and any unmet yearly deductible for any equipment or supplies included in the Competitive Bidding Program. You may need to use specific suppliers for some types of diabetes testing sup Continue reading >>

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Comparing The Cost Of Diabetes Test Strips At Major Retailers

Where’s the best place to buy blood glucose monitor test strips over-the-counter? And which test strips are the most affordable? We took a look at the top blood sugar test strip costs at a few of the major retailers to see what the best deals are. Hands down, the ReliOn brand of test strips is the most affordable if you’re paying for test strips out-of-pockt at a meager 18 cents per strip (in a 50 count box) at Walmart and 35 cents (in a 50 count box) if you buy on Amazon. However, it’s only available at Walmart (and Amazon), so that can make it difficult if there isn’t a Walmart in your area. The next most affordable test strip is the Bayer Contour Next, which came it between 77 cents and 86 cents per strip in their 50 count boxes if you buy them at a brick-and-mortar store, or 24 cents per strip on Amazon. Lifescan’s One Touch Ultra Blue, Roche’s Accuchek Aviva, and Abbott’s Freestyle Lite came in at well over a dollar a strip at all the major pharmacy retailers, but all of them in under a dollar a strip if you buy on Amazon. Roche’s Accuchek Aviva came in as the most expensive test strip at every retailer, except Amazon, where it came in a whole 5 cents cheaper than One Touch Ultra Blue. Amazon is for the most part the most affordable place to buy your test strips out-of-pocket, unless you’re buying Walmart’s ReliOn test strips. In that case, you’re better off just driving to Walmart. Here’s the full breakdown: Walmart One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $68.79 / $1.37 per strip Freestyle Lite – 50 count: $81.64 / $1.63 per strip Bayer Contour Next – 50 count: $38.88 / $.77 per strip ReliOn Prime – 50 count: $9.00 / $.18 per strip AccuChek Aviva Plus – 50 count: $82.27 / $1.64 per strip Walgreens One Touch Ultra Blue – 50 count: $79.9 Continue reading >>

A Low-cost Inkjet-printed Glucose Test Strip System For Resource-poor Settings.

A Low-cost Inkjet-printed Glucose Test Strip System For Resource-poor Settings.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The prevalence of diabetes is increasing in low-resource settings; however, accessing glucose monitoring is extremely difficult and expensive in these regions. Work is being done to address the multitude of issues surrounding diabetes care in low-resource settings, but an affordable glucose monitoring solution has yet to be presented. An inkjet-printed test strip solution is being proposed as a solution to this problem. METHODS: The use of a standard inkjet printer is being proposed as a manufacturing method for low-cost glucose monitoring test strips. The printer cartridges are filled with enzyme and dye solutions that are printed onto filter paper. The result is a colorimetric strip that turns a blue/green color in the presence of blood glucose. RESULTS: Using a light-based spectroscopic reading, the strips show a linear color change with an R(2) = .99 using glucose standards and an R(2) = .93 with bovine blood. Initial testing with bovine blood indicates that the strip accuracy is comparable to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard 15197 for glucose testing in the 0-350 mg/dL range. However, further testing with human blood will be required to confirm this. A visible color gradient was observed with both the glucose standard and bovine blood experiment, which could be used as a visual indicator in cases where an electronic glucose meter was unavailable. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that an inkjet-printed filter paper test strip is a feasible method for monitoring blood glucose levels. The use of inkjet printers would allow for local manufacturing to increase supply in remote regions. This system has the potential to address the dire need for glucose monitoring in low-resource settings. © 2015 Diabetes Technolog Continue reading >>

Diabetic Test Strips

Diabetic Test Strips

The product you are looking for might be discontinued. Blood glucose test strips or diabetes test strips are small disposable strips of plastic that measure the glucose levels in your blood to help someone understand if their blood sugar levels are in a healthy range. It is primarily used in, which is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. People who are diagnosed with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia would often use a blood glucose monitor, which can help better manage diabetes by tracking any fluctuation in your blood glucose level. To use a blood glucose monitor, a small drop of blood from the user is placed on the end of a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the persons blood glucose level. Some blood glucose test strips allow the reapplication of more blood to the same test strip if needed. A blood lancet or a lancing device is used to extract a blood sample. The blood glucose monitor will display the level in units of grams per liter or molar concentration. Other factors that can affect blood glucose levels include exercise, food, medications, and stress. At CVS Pharmacy we have a wide selection of diabetic test strips for home blood glucose monitors from trusted brands. If you are unsure which test strip is compatible with your monitor, ask your doctor before making a decision. For additional information and recommendations for choosing the right diabetic test strip, visit your nearest CVS Pharmacy location or consult with your physician to learn more about what options are available. var w=window;if(w.performance||w.mozPerformance||w.msPerformance||w.webkitPerformance){var d=document;AKSB=w.AKSB||{},AKSB.q=AKSB.q||[],AKSB.mark=AKSB.mark||function(e,_){AKSB.q.push Continue reading >>

Second-hand Diabetic Testing Strips Being Sold On Blackmarket

Second-hand Diabetic Testing Strips Being Sold On Blackmarket

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) From social media to the streets, there seems to be a huge demand for diabetic testing strips, which test glucose levels in the blood. For people living with diabetes, like Anna DeFeo, a supply of the strips is essential. Im always testing during the course of the day, she said. If the blood sugar was high, they would know to take extra insulin. If the blood sugar was too low, they would know that they need to take in some sugar, explained Dr. Robert Gabbay , with the Joslin Diabetes Center. Because the little strips are so smart, theyre expensive. Thats a real challenge, Dr. Gabbay said. A box of 50, for example, costs about $80. If youre under-insured or have no coverage at all, the strips can become a financial burden. As a result, second-hand strip dealers have set up shop online, placing ads looking to buy unused and unwanted strips. CBS2s John Dias met up with one such dealer in south Jersey. He took three boxes, gave me $15 for each box for a total of $45, Dias reported. While the dealer claimed to donate the strips with the help of a local church group to people in Africa, experts say theyre more likely to end up online in the new underground economy for diabetic supplies, like cheap test strips. Those strips may not be as accurate, and therefore people are making decisions about taking insulin based on bad information, said Dr. Gabbay. Why take the chance, he said, on a strip that could be expired or tampered with? You dont really know what youre getting that could potentially affect your health, he said. While buying and selling diabetic test strips is not illegal, it is against the law to deal strips paid for by Medicare or Medicaid. Still, experts say diabetics receiving free or low-cost strips are the primary supplier to second-hand d Continue reading >>

Tips For Cutting Costs Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Tips For Cutting Costs Of Blood Glucose Test Strips

Tips for cutting costs of blood glucose test strips In the U.S., you can try these tips to reduce the cost of test strips: Check with insurance or Medicare. Your insurance or Medicare will help to cover the cost of test strips if you have a prescription. Check with them, they may have a contract with a different meter company and you may be paying more than you have to for your test strips. Check with your blood glucose meter company. Many companies have programs or discount cards to help with the cost of testing supplies. The number should be on the back of your meter. Ask your store. Some chains have non-branded meters and testing supplies at a lower cost than branded meters. Patient assistance and outreach programs. Ask your health care provider about resources that may be available to you. Moreland P (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn. May 8, 2018. Your Medicare coverage: Blood sugar (glucose) test strips. Accessed May 8, 2018. Tsai A. 4 ways to save on test strips. Accessed May 8, 2018. Everything you need to know about diabetes test strips. Accessed May 8, 2018. Continue reading >>

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much? (part 2)

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much? (part 2)

Last week I was busy being blown away by the amazing technology of glucose test strips. But back to reality. Why do these things cost so much? Why do prices vary by 600% or more? From what I can tell on Consumer Reports, customer reviews, articles like this one in Diabetes Forecast, and comments on diabetes blogs, it seems like most meters and strips have pretty similar quality. So how do you choose? Meters have a variety of features. Some have backlights, which is nice in the dark. Some speak to you, which helps people with poor vision. Some can store more results in memory. Some hook to your computer or smart phone with a cable to upload results; others connect with wireless; others don’t have that function. Some create graphs for you of various types. Meters are temperature sensitive. Some can function at higher temperatures; others can work at lower temperatures. Some burn through batteries faster than others. Some seem to need a little more blood than others to get a reading. Diabetes Forecast says meters are so similar that some people just buy the cheapest one, and it works for them. But most meters are cheap. The cost comes in the strips. So the best meter might be the one with the most affordable strips. When it comes to strip cost, the mega-retailers like Walmart, Walgreens, and Kroger have an advantage. And the quality seems comparable. One user commented that Strips for [Walmart Prime] run $9.00 per fifty, a $60 cost reduction from my Accu-Chek strips which are $69 at Costco. On a typical reading of 180 the meters will be maybe two points different. Pretty darn close. But that cost advantage only holds if you don’t have insurance. A lot of insurers will pay for Accu-Chek, OneTouch, or some more expensive strips, but won’t pay for a Walmart Prime or Wal Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Going Undercover To Investigate Selling Test Strips For Cash

Maybe you've seen the "Diabetic Strips" signs on the side of the road in your state and also wondered what actually happens when you call one of the numbers listed... We wrote about organizations dealing in test strips cheap-for-cash in our post "Test Strip Charities" last year, but without the extra bonus of having an undercover "secret shopper" to check the service out. Now our talented cartoonist, D-Advocate and correspondent Mike Lawson offered to make that happen by following up on one of these surprising road-side signs. Read on to discover what Mike found out! Special to the 'Mine by Mr. Mike Lawson I felt like Woodward. No...I felt like Bernstein. Wait. Which one did Robert Redford play in All The President's Men? That's the one I felt like. I was sitting in a McDonald's parking lot in Scottsdale, Arizona, waiting for a man named Marcus to meet me so I could sell a box of 50 test strips. I arranged this meeting by calling a phone number that I saw on a road-side sign in Phoenix that said "Ca$h Paid For Diabetic Strips." It is not illegal for companies to buy and sell test strips like this — although the companies are required to register with the FDA and many fail to do so — yet this transaction still felt a little shady. When I called the number, for example, I wasn't greeted with a company name but just by a woman who identified herself as "Stephanie." Stephanie told me that there was no physical building for me to drop off the strips, but rather a courier would be sent to me. Stephanie also told me that the price paid for strips varied based on the brand and the expiration date. So I could sell this box of One Touch strips that I purchased for $10 on my private insurance to this unnamed company for $20. And this same box of strips will sell for $40 or mor Continue reading >>

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

The Murky World Of Secondhand Diabetic Test Strips

Chelsea Arnold was getting into debt over tiny pieces of plastic: diabetic test strips. When Arnold was first diagnosed with diabetes she needed to test her blood sugar 10 times a day. She went to Wal-Mart and found that one box, which contained only a five-day supply of test strips, was $80. Arnold called her parents and told them she didn't know what to do. She didn't have the money. Arnold then did what a lot of people do when they need help: She searched on Google. She typed in the words "cheap test strips," and Craigslist came up. She bought eight boxes for less than $100. At Wal-Mart, she would have paid $640. Arnold said, "it was like having a life sentence and then realizing that there's a cure." With this Google search, Arnold stumbled into an underground economy for diabetic supplies. It's a market that offers a lower-cost option for test strips, though it is hard for customers to know where the boxes come from. Some boxes may be repackaged and unsafe to use, and some boxes are sold by diabetics who are desperate for cash. But many of them come from people who have health insurance and have accumulated extra test strips. Trey falls into this category. (He asked us not to use his last name, because he fears retribution from his insurance company, even though he feels he hasn't broken any laws.) He moved from one type of blood sugar monitoring system to another type of monitoring system and ended up with 20 extra test strip boxes. At that point, Trey began researching. He said, "Obviously No. 1: Is it legal to be able to sell test strips?" Trey realized that it is legal, with a caveat. "It's kind of a gray market as long as you don't get them from Medicare and Medicaid," he said. Trey then found a local buyer on Craigslist. It starts to look a little seedy here. Continue reading >>

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Cheap blood glucose meters are still accurate and consistent It may be tempting to judge a blood glucose meter solely by its initial cost. But given that someone testing their glucose levels four times a day can blow through more than 100 test strips in a month, a glucose meter's true cost is best measured by how much you spend on test strips over time. In fact, some major manufacturers give away their meters for free because they recoup their losses on sales of test strips. Still, the meters with the lowest yearly operating cost also tend to cost very little themselves. Take our best-reviewed cheap glucose meter, the Bayer Contour Next (Est. $15). It's one of the few truly inexpensive meters that not only makes it into clinical trials but also excels: In a study published in 2014 in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, researchers found that the Bayer Contour Next outperformed a professional glucose monitor designed for point-of-care testing. This small, inexpensive glucose meter also receives Excellent scores for accuracy from a leading consumer research organization, alongside Very Good scores for repeatability and convenience. User reviews on the Bayer Contour Next tend to be very short and to the point; at this price, users just want a blood glucose meter that does its job. But they also love not having to code the meter when they open a new vial of test strips, being able to collect blood from almost any angle, and having the option to add more blood to the test strip if there wasn't enough the first time. The Bayer Contour Next requires a 0.6 microliter blood sample and allows you to use your palm as an alternate testing site. Other popular features -- and unusual finds on a glucose meter in this price range -- include the ability to add notes to store Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Strips: $87.99 Or $12.99, Or $9 For 50. Cheaper Without Insurance? Quite Possibly.

Diabetes Test Strips: $87.99 Or $12.99, Or $9 For 50. Cheaper Without Insurance? Quite Possibly.

Cheaper to get them online than through the pharmacy with my insurance was the comment from one of the early contributors, who spent $25 for a box of 50 strips. Another also spent $25 for a box of 50 strips. The comment: I can get the test strips cheaper, out of pocket at Costco and Walmart if I buy 100. My father has Kaiser Advantage gets the same strips (3 month supply) for free. This is not even a 30 day supply, I need 60 (90 right now) normally. Updates:From the Diabetes Social Media tweetchatOctober 1, from @T1Runner: 12.99 for 50! Ihealth Iphone meter #DSMA From comments on our partner KPCCs web site : This: I am fortunate that my current insurance covers my test strips when I have to change to Covered California I hope that they will do the same.. I wanted to bring up a point relative to the cost of the strips. Often I think that people do not test as often as they should because the strips are too expensive. Check with your doctor to see if you can get them through mail order (or another pathway) to minimize the cost. And this: Walmart sells the Relion Prime meter for $16.24 and the strips are $9.00 per 50. That is the best pricing I have found. And just so people know, all of the different brands of meters are required to work within set specifications. My Relion meter is just as good as any of the higher priced meters. I am a diabetic (Type 1) and have had to self pay for the past 9 years. Diabetes is not cheap. These were early comments from our #PriceCheck project, crowdsourcing prices with our partners at KQED public radio in San Francisco and KPCC/Southern California Public Radio in Los Angeles, with funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Neither community member left an email address for us to contact, so weve got a few questions: how m Continue reading >>

Cheapest Diabetic Test Strips Available Here!

Cheapest Diabetic Test Strips Available Here!

Manufacturers of diabetic test strips are always seeking new ways to enhance their glucose monitoring systems to gain more share of the market. While brand test strips are continually adopting new features, the competition is at its highest. You would think the price of diabetic test strips would drop in such a competitive environment but the reality is proving otherwise. The cost of glucose test strips have have recently increased as some of the biggest manufacturers such as Roche or OneTouch raised their prices by almost 10% just this last month. The cost of diabetic test strips continues to rise as more individuals are diagnosed with diabetes. According to American Diabetes Association, 25.8 million Americans lived with diabetes in 2011. This numbers makes up about 8.3% of the U.S Population. Though this number is only on the rise much like the cost of test strips, individuals with diabetes will continue to look for ways to save money on their diabetic test strips. The good news, thanks to internet technology, finding cheapest diabetic test strips is now easier than ever. Cheapest diabetic test strips are often found online. Unlike large pharmacies such as Walmart, Rite Aid, or Walgreens which continue to retail test strips at high prices, Diabetic Outlet offers the cheapest diabetes tests strips in singles and bundles to keep diabetes management affordable for people with diabetes who pay out of pocket for their glucose test strips. See a list of our discounted diabetic test strips and compare for yourself: Diabetic Outlet offers free shipping and fast delivery on most major name brands of glucose testing strips including: Accu-Chek, Bayer, FreeStyle, Nipro, One Touch Ultra, Unistrip, Prodigy, and more. Continue reading >>

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