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What Is The Borderline Of The Blood Sugar?

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Prediabetes (borderline Diabetes)

Tweet Prediabetes, also commonly referred to as borderline diabetes, is a metabolic condition and growing global problem that is closely tied to obesity. If undiagnosed or untreated, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes; which whilst treatable is currently not fully reversible. What is prediabetes? Prediabetes is characterised by the presence of blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be classed as diabetes. For this reason, prediabetes is often described as the “gray area” between normal blood sugar and diabetic levels. In the UK, around 7 million people are estimated to have prediabetes and thus have a high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. [17] Prediabetes may be referred to as impaired fasting glucose (IFT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels after a period of fasting, or as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), if you have higher than normal sugar levels following eating. The increasing number of new cases of prediabetes presents a global concern as it carries large scale implications towards the future burden on healthcare. Between 2003 and 2011, the prevalence of prediabetes in England alone more than tripled, with 35.3% of the adult population, or 1 in every 3 people having prediabetes. [106] Learn more about prediabetes Prediabetes is a critical stage in the development of diabetes, for it is at this point that lifestyle choices can be made to turn it around. Early, decisive action can slow down or even halt the development of type 2 diabetes. What are the symptoms of prediabetes? Many people have prediabetes but are completely unaware of it. This is because the condition often develops gradually without any warning signs or symptoms. In many cases, the sufferer only learns of their borderline diabetic sta Continue reading >>

What Is The Glucose Number For Borderline Diabetes?

What Is The Glucose Number For Borderline Diabetes?

Borderline diabetes is a stage in the potential development of diabetes when there is too much glucose in your blood, but not enough that you are diagnosed as diabetic. An elevated blood glucose level is a risk factor for becoming diabetic. Identification Doctors use the same tests to diagnose borderline diabetes and diabetes. Based on the results, you are diagnosed as normal, pre-diabetic, or diabetic. Types The oral glucose tolerance test measures your blood glucose level after you fast and then drink a high-glucose liquid. If your blood glucose level is 140 to 200 mg/dl during this test, you are borderline, or pre-diabetic. The intravenous or fasting plasma glucose test measures the amount of glucose in your blood after an injection of glucose into your bloodstream. If your blood glucose level is 100 to 126 mg/dl during this test, you are borderline, or pre-diabetic. Fun Fact Mg stands for milligrams. Dl stands for deciliter. One hundred mg/dl (100 mg/dl) means that your blood glucose level is equivalent to having 100 milligrams of glucose in one deciliter of blood. Significance Learning that your blood glucose level is borderline is an opportunity to prevent a serious disease. If you are borderline, lose weight, get regular exercise and eat well. You might never become diabetic. Expert insight Many health care professionals do not like to differentiate between borderline diabetes and diabetes because people often do not take “borderline” or ‘pre-diabetic” seriously. Barbara El started and sold two businesses before becoming a professional writer in 2003. She specializes in educational, technical, garden and business writing, and her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications. She holds a master’s degree in education and enjoys voluntee Continue reading >>

What Is Considered Borderline Diabetes?

What Is Considered Borderline Diabetes?

Borderline diabetes is a term for a condition that's now called prediabetes. It's based on the level of blood glucose, also known as blood sugar, when you have fasted (which means you haven't eaten any food overnight). Your doctor will test your blood glucose in the office. If it is below 100 milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dL), it is normal. Borderline diabetes or prediabetes occurs when your fasting blood glucose is between 100 and 125 mg/dL. A level of 126 mg/dL or above indicates diabetes. When the diabetes police are in hot pursuit and you are within five miles of a state border you have borderline diabetes. Sorry. I couldn’t resist. In the medical world we use certain fixed blood sugar numbers to determine who has diabetes and who doesn’t. The standards are set by the American Diabetes Association and are adjusted from time to time as new research reveals new truths. So if your blood sugar is above a set threshold you have diabetes. If it’s below a set threshold you don’t. If you fall between the two sets of numbers you’re not a member of either tribe. You aren’t really quite “normal,” but your sugar isn’t high enough to really be considered a person with diabetes either. You have borderline diabetes, prediabetes, or in more technical terms, impaired glucose tolerance. But none of these labels convey the deadly seriousness of the condition. Here’s the truth, no bull, if you have borderline diabetes, full-blown diabetes is on the way. The conversion rate from prediabetes to full blown diabetes is mind numbing, and because of this I especially dislike the term “borderline” as it makes the condition sound somehow less serious than it is. At any rate, on to the numbers. We now use a quick and simple blood test called an A1C to Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetic? 6 Natural Ways To Lower Blood Sugar

Borderline Diabetic? 6 Natural Ways To Lower Blood Sugar

Borderline Diabetic? 6 Natural Ways to Lower Blood Sugar For the past several years, youve promised to start eating healthier and exercising more times than you can remember. However, a recent visit to the doctors office alerted you of the dangers lying ahead if you dont make better choices soon. After analyzing some routine blood work, your physician informed you of your borderline diabetic status. Because diabetes can lead to a myriad of life-threatening complications, you know the time to act is now. If you can relate to this frightening scenario, consider the following 6 natural ways to lower blood sugar. Do you have a bottle of cinnamon languishing from lack of use in the back of your pantry? If you cant remember the last time you sprinkled cinnamon on something, you need to reconnect with this spice. Consuming cinnamon is believed to both lower blood sugar levels and decrease the risk of succumbing to dangerous type 2 diabetes . Some tasty ways to increase your cinnamon intake include adding it to: Are you getting the recommended 7 to 9 hours of sleep each night? A chronic deficit of sleep may cause your body to use insulin less efficiently. And, when youre tired and sleepy, you may also make poorer food selections. Feasting on foods rich in fiber is another one of the best natural ways to lower blood sugar. By consuming foods high in fiber, you can prevent huge fluctuations in your blood sugar levels. And, you may decrease your insulin resistance and risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Foods with high fiber concentrations also help you feel full for longer periods of time. Therefore, any successful weight loss plan should include several servings of fiber rich foods each day. When shopping for fiber filled foods, opt for fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, a Continue reading >>

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Understanding Borderline Diabetes: Signs, Symptoms, And More

Borderline diabetes, also called prediabetes, is a condition that develops before someone gets type 2 diabetes. It’s also known as impaired fasting glucose or glucose intolerance. It basically means your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but they’re not quite high enough to be considered diabetes. During the prediabetes phase, your pancreas usually still produces enough insulin in response to ingested carbohydrates. The insulin is less effective at removing the sugar from the bloodstream, though, so your blood sugar remains high. This condition is called insulin resistance. If you have prediabetes, you should know you’re not alone. In 2015, it was estimated that 84.1 million people age 18 and older had the condition. That’s 1 in 3 Americans. Having prediabetes doesn’t mean you’ll definitely develop diabetes. It is a warning of what could lie ahead, however. People with prediabetes have a 5 to 15-fold higher risk for type 2 diabetes than someone with normal blood sugar levels. Those chances increase if you don’t make any healthy changes to your diet or activity habits. “Prediabetes is not pre-problem,” says Jill Weisenberger, MS, RD, CDE, and author of “Diabetes Weight Loss Week by Week.” Someone with insulin resistance in its early stages can develop type 2 diabetes if it continues long enough. Only 10 percent of people with prediabetes even know they have it because they don’t display any symptoms. “Often, people consider these symptoms part of their normal day, so they’re ignored,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and co-author of “Diabetes Meal Planning and Nutrition for Dummies.” Any of these risk factors can increase your chances of developing prediabetes: being inacti Continue reading >>

What Is Prediabetes?

What Is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is a wake-up call that you’re on the path to diabetes. But it’s not too late to turn things around. If you have it (like 86 million other Americans), your blood sugar (glucose) level is higher than it should be, but not in the diabetes range. People used to call it "borderline" diabetes. Normally, your body makes a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar. When you have prediabetes, that system doesn't work as well as it should. You might not be able to make enough insulin after eating, or your body might not respond to insulin properly. Prediabetes makes you more likely to get heart disease or have a stroke. But you can take action to lower those risks. Your doctor will give you one of three simple blood tests: Fasting plasma glucose test. You won't eat for 8 hours before taking this blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 100 Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 100-125 Diabetes if your blood sugar is 126 or higher Oral glucose tolerance test. First, you'll take the fasting glucose test. Then you'll drink a sugary solution. Two hours after that, you'll take another blood test. The results are: Normal if your blood sugar is less than 140 after the second test Prediabetes if your blood sugar is 140-199 after the second test Diabetes if your blood sugar is 200 or higher after the second test Hemoglobin A1C (or average blood sugar) test. This blood test shows your average blood sugar level for the past 2 to 3 months. Doctors can use it to diagnose prediabetes or diabetes or, if you already know you have diabetes, it helps show whether it's under control. The results are: Normal: 5.6% or less Prediabetes: 5.7 to 6.4% Diabetes: 6.5% or above You may need to take the test again to confirm the results. Lifestyle change Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Borderline Diabetes: What You Need To Know

The term borderline diabetes refers to a condition called prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classed as type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is to be considered a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that 10 to 23 percent of people with prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Prediabetes can be accompanied by other risk factors. It is associated with conditions such as obesity, especially abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, high blood fat levels and low levels of "good" cholesterol. When these risk factors "cluster" together in a person, there is a higher risk of not just type 2 diabetes but heart disease and stroke as well. Other medical terms used when talking about prediabetes include: Symptoms of borderline diabetes Prediabetes is not the same as diabetes. However, neither prediabetes nor diabetes have clear symptoms. Both can go unnoticed until prediabetes has progressed to type 2 diabetes, or until another complication such as a heart attack occurs. Some people may experience symptoms as their blood sugars remain high. Passing urine more often and increased thirst can be symptoms of type 2 diabetes before it is diagnosed and treated. Prediabetes is not found unless testing is done for it. Testing is carried out when there are risk factors that make prediabetes more likely. Causes and risk factors of borderline diabetes The main risk factors for prediabetes are being overweight or obese, not getting enough exercise, and having a family history of type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors include: Drinking a lot of high-sugar drinks may also increase the risk. One study found that people who regularly drink sugary products - 1 or 2 cans of soda a day, for ex Continue reading >>

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

Do You Recognize These 11 Early Warning Signs Of Borderline Diabetes?

What You Need To Know- Borderline Diabetes Diabetes does not just develop overnight. Borderline diabetes may have no symptoms at all, or you may experience 1 or more of the symptoms described below. You can prevent diabetes if you identify borderline diabetes early. What You Need To Do- Borderline Diabetes If you have any of the symptoms described below then get checked out by your health care provider. If you are in a high risk group than you also should be screen for prediabetes, even if you do not have symptoms. I was stopped at a local function recently and the person I was speaking to told me she was recently diagnosed with borderline diabetes. My acquaintance was very concerned because she read and heard about many of the complications of diabetes; and she wanted to know what this meant for her. She asked me things like “do I need to check my blood sugar all the time now,” “do I need to eat differently,” and “am I going to have to start taking medications?” While I discuss the answers to many of these particular questions in a previous post, I am always struck, in this day of the news coverage of obesity and the diabetes epidemic, how many people have not heard of borderline diabetes and its complications. What Is Borderline Diabetes? Actually, there is no medical diagnosis called “borderline diabetes.” Rather, borderline diabetes refers to a medical condition called prediabetes. This is when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed with type II diabetes. People with borderline diabetes or prediabetes are more likely to develop type II diabetes and may already have some of the signs or symptoms of diabetes. Many times patients with borderline diabetes (prediabetes) will not have any signs or symptoms. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes – Know The Symptoms, Signs, Risks, Causes & Lifestyle Changes

Prediabetes – Know The Symptoms, Signs, Risks, Causes & Lifestyle Changes

Prediabetes? Is it for real? The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Govt., says “prediabetes means your blood glucose (sugar) levels are higher than normal—but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes.” Blood glucose (sugar) levels are one the symptoms of prediabetes that people ignore. What Is Prediabetes? The American Diabetes Association classifies anyone with fasting blood sugar between 100-126 mg/DL or the equivalent of HbA1c between 5.7-6.4% as having prediabetes. Those with fasting blood sugar above 126 mg/DL or HbA1c 6.5% are said to have diabetes. Most of us think – we’re fine, going about our business, like normal. Then we visit the doc; either just for a regular physical or because we feel we’re using the washroom a lot more than before, so let’s figure out what’s happening. He/she orders some tests, the results arrive with a red mark against the blood sugar number and boom – we now have diabetes! That’s not quite how it all happens. Elevated levels of insulin and blood sugar cause diabetes damage to you body for years before you’re actually labelled “diabetic”. That period, often lasting years, is called prediabetes. It is like you are “on the fence.” Many experts refer to this condition as “borderline diabetes.” The mechanism through which elevated sugar and insulin levels harm your body is being better understood each day. The sooner we are able to catch the symptoms, the sooner we can prevent full blown diabetes from harming us. RELATED: Take A Prediabetes Risk Test Causes of Prediabetes While the exact causes of prediabetes is yet unknown, family history and genetics seem to play a role in its development. A sedentary, stressful lifestyle and poor food choices and Continue reading >>

Borderline Diabetes

Borderline Diabetes

Borderline diabetes is also called “prediabetes”. It means that your blood glucose levels are higher than they are in normal people but are not high enough to be considered as having type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes within the next ten years. If you suffer from borderline diabetes, the complications of diabetes may already be beginning even though you don’t actually have diabetes yet. Just because you have prediabetes doesn’t mean you will inevitably get diabetes. If you change your lifestyle and incorporate a healthy diet along with an increase in exercise as part of your new lifestyle, you may be able to lose some weight so that the blood sugar levels return to normal and you won’t have diabetes. Signs and Symptoms of Borderline Diabetes Most of the time, there are no symptoms with prediabetes. If you have a condition known as acanthosis nigricans, however, it could mean you will develop type 2 diabetes. Acanthosis nigricans involves having areas of dark skin on the armpits, knuckles, knees, and neck. If the borderline diabetes has turned into type 2 diabetes, you may experience increased thirst, tiredness, increased urination, and blurry vision, which are typical signs of an elevated blood sugar condition. Causes of Borderline Diabetes No one knows what causes borderline diabetes but it appears to be partially hereditary. There have been some genes identified that lead to insulin resistance, which is the underlying problem in type 2 diabetes. Being inactive or having excessive fat around the abdomen also increase the chances of your having borderline diabetes. The underlying cause is insulin resistance, which means that the insulin cannot put glucose into the cells to be used for the production of cellular energy. Continue reading >>

Borderline Fasting Blood Sugar: Why It’s A Problem And 5 Ways To Fix It

Borderline Fasting Blood Sugar: Why It’s A Problem And 5 Ways To Fix It

The patient I am going to describe is unique in her own issues, but her frustration with conventional medicine could be duplicated in my practice many times over. Louisa is a forty-five-year-old teacher and mother of two. After the birth of her children, she was unable to lose the twenty-five pounds she gained and she was experiencing profound fatigue. After watching one of my webinars on the epidemic of diabesity, which is broadly described as the continuum from mild insulin resistance (when your cells become numb to insulin) to full-blown diabetes and obesity, [1] Louisa asked her primary care physician to test her fasting blood sugar and check her thyroid. Her blood sugar came back at 98 mg/dl and her thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) was 2.7. Her doctor told her that both were in the normal range and that she was simply experiencing the effects of aging. Her doctor was correct that the American Diabetes Association has identified a fasting plasma glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL as being pre-diabetic and anything below 100 is “normal.”[2] But if you were to wait until your glucose level is in that range, you’ve got a serious problem. In fact, current guidelines have been shown to miss the diagnosis of insulin resistance in 41 to 50 percent of the cases.[3],[4] Several studies demonstrate that fasting glucose levels should be less than 87 mg/dL.[5],[6] Anything above that is borderline and suggests insulin resistance, and most likely the cause of fatigue, low energy, more belly fat, sugar cravings, and difficulty with weight loss. You see, blood sugar should neither be too high in the morning nor go up and down excessively. For healthy weight and energy, your body needs to use glucose while keeping your serum blood sugar relatively stable. Fortunately, Louisa was Continue reading >>

12 Signs That You’re Borderline Diabetic

12 Signs That You’re Borderline Diabetic

You're really thirsty and are peeing a lotSedovaY/Shutterstock "Prediabetes is caused when the body is unable to efficiently process blood sugars," says UPMC endocrinologist Dr. Jason Ng, MD, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. "This happens over time as the body builds up resistance to insulin, the hormone that helps the body control blood sugars." As you become insulin resistant, the body has to produce more insulin to keep blood sugars at a good level. Eventually it can't keep up, so blood sugars rise. Prediabetes may take you by surprise, as there often aren't symptoms—though there are a few subtle cues you can look out for. "A patient may feel slightly more thirsty and have to urinate more over time as well as the sugars increase in their body," Dr. Ng says. If you're looking for a step-by-step plan to reversing diabetes—or borderline diabetes—check this out. You're exhausted ViChizh/Shutterstock Borderline diabetes could be one of the medical reasons you're tired all the time. If you're one of the 84 million Americans (that's more than 1 in 3) who have prediabetes, you may notice you're not feeling up to your normal activity level. "Patients may feel more tired or sluggish," Dr. Ng says. Blood sugar fluctuations can cause fatigue; plus, other factors that often appear with blood sugar problems could be the culprit, such as depression or obesity, according to a University of Illinois study. Physical activity is recommended by the American Diabetes Association to help with prediabetes symptoms, but ironically people with the condition may be too tired to exercise. If that's the case, see your doctor. "Most of prediabetes is diagnosed by lab work at a doctor's office," Dr. Ng says. With prediabetes, "fasting sugar is betwee Continue reading >>

Is 'borderline' Diabetes Really Diabetes?

Is 'borderline' Diabetes Really Diabetes?

I just learned that I'm a "borderline" diabetic, even though my blood glucose reading was very close to normal. Now I'm not sure what to do. Should I be consistently checking my blood sugar level, eating differently, or taking medication as though I actually have diabetes? I don't want to develop diabetes, but I don't want to take unnecessary precautions either. — Sue, New Jersey Great question! Now that you've been diagnosed with prediabetes, prevention is key. Prediabetes is characterized by either impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Both of these terms refer to the level of sugar in the bloodstream, and they're both ways of saying that you have prediabetes. If your fasting glucose level (a test in which blood is drawn after six hours without food) is between 100 and 125 mg/dl, you have IFG. If your blood sugar level two hours after a glucose challenge test is between 139 and 200 mg/dl, you have IGT. Okay — now that we have the classification straight, why should you be worried about these numbers if yours are not in the diabetic range? Here's why: As your blood glucose rises above the normal level, your risk of developing damage in the body's small blood vessels, and ultimately your risk of a heart attack or stroke, also rises. In addition, having abnormal glucose levels is a risk factor for developing outright diabetes in the future. By bringing you blood sugar levels back in the normal range, you can probably prevent the onset of diabetes and other complications, such as coronary artery disease. It is not absolutely essential to frequently check your glucose levels at home as long as you and your doctor monitor them periodically. The precautions that you can and should take to prevent complications and the onset of diabetes consi Continue reading >>

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