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What Is The Best Grain For Diabetic?

Ways To Get More Whole Grains In Your Meal Plan

Ways To Get More Whole Grains In Your Meal Plan

Diabetic Living / Food to Eat / Nutrition Ways to Get More Whole Grains in Your Meal Plan Revamp your pantry to fit your diabetes meal plan by adding healthful whole grains to your cupboards -- we show you how with our easy-to-follow pantry guide. Stock your pantry with whole grains to make healthful versions of items you can enjoy along with everyone else -- including brownies and cakes for occasional treats. Our guide shows you how to stock your pantry with grain-base products like bread, flour, and baking mixes. Replacing refined grains with whole grains may help improve blood glucose control and weight management. Plus, whole grains may reduce your risk of health issues that can accompany diabetes, such as heart disease and high blood pressure. Check out our whole grain guide to give your pantry a healthful makeover -- without skimping on flavor. Diabetes Meal Plan , Best Foods for Diabetes , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition Whole grain product pick: Barilla whole grain pasta, barilla.com, 800/922-7455. Also try Dreamfields pasta or Hodgson Mill organic whole wheat pasta with flaxseed. Make the switch: A serving of the Barilla pasta has triple the fiber of traditional refined-flour pasta (6 grams versus 2 grams of fiber per serving). Diabetes Meal Plan , Best Foods for Diabetes , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutrition Whole grain product pick: Texmati brown rice, riceselect.com, 800/232-7423. Also try Uncle Ben's natural whole grain brown rice. Make the switch: Switching to brown (whole grain) rice is an easy yet effective way to complement your diabetes meal plan -- just don't forget to measure portions. Diabetes Meal Plan , Best Foods for Diabetes , Diabetic Diet , What to Eat with Diabetes , Diabetes Nutritio Continue reading >>

Grains And Diabetes | Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council

Grains And Diabetes | Grains & Legumes Nutrition Council

You are here: Home / Grains / Grains and Health / Grains and Diabetes Diabetes is Australias fastest growing chronic health problem and accounts for 10% of all deaths in Australia. In 2008, total number of Australians with diagnosed diabetes was 1.015 million people, but it is thought to affect far more with 1 in every 5 people with diabetes undiagnosed. There is strong epidemiological evidence from around the world to suggest that eating a variety of whole grain foods is beneficial in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes this relationship is a consistent conclusion in systematic reviews. Whole grain andhigh fibre foodsare ideal carbohydrate foods to help manage or reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. Good quality carbohydrates for improved blood glucose control Carbohydrate is an important energy source for our body. When we eat carbohydrate foods our blood glucose levels rise depending on the amount of carbohydrate we eat, the type of carbohydrate foods we choose and our bodys ability to control blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes develops when our body is no longer able to control blood glucose levels within the normal range. So its very important for people to manage diabetes or reduce their risk of developing diabetes by choosing good quality carbohydrate foods, eating regular meals and spreading carbohydrate foods out evenly during the day. Good quality carbohydrates include whole grains and high fibre grain foods, including breads, breakfast cereals, pasta, rice and crispbreads, provide essential nutrients like vitamins, minerals and protective components like fibres and phytonutrients (i.e. antioxidants). Low GI carbohydrate foods help to improve blood glucose control as these foods are absorbed more slowly than high GI foods and so cause smaller r Continue reading >>

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

If you have diabetes, you may constantly ask yourself: Is this OK for me to eat? While as a diabetic, you need to pay more attention to what you eat, you don't need to eat special foods. As a nutritious whole-grain, quinoa makes a healthy choice for anyone, especially someone with diabetes. As a low-glycemic carb that's rich in fiber and magnesium, quinoa is a good grain for people with diabetes. Quinoa and Carbs When you have diabetes, you need to be aware of the carbohydrate content in the food you eat. When your body digests foods with carbs, it turns it into sugar. You don't need to avoid carbs, but you do need to manage how much you eat at meals. Your doctor or a dietitian can help you determine your daily carb needs. As a grain, carbs are the primary source of calories in quinoa. A 1/2-cup serving of cooked quinoa has 110 calories, 20 grams of carbs, 4 grams of protein and 3 grams of fiber. As a frame of reference, most people eat 30 to 60 grams of carbs at each meal. That means you might be able to fit in up to 1 1/2 cups of cooked quinoa at a meal. Glycemic Index While quinoa is a source of carbs, not all carbs act the same in your body. Some get digested quickly and cause a rapid rise in blood sugar, referred to as high-glycemic foods. Others digest more slowly and only cause a slight but even rise in blood sugar, referred to as low-glycemic foods. The glycemic index is a tool that ranks how carbs affect your blood sugar. Quinoa is considered a low-glycemic food. As a carb that only causes a slight rise in blood sugar, quinoa makes a good choice for people with diabetes. Fiber Content and Diabetes With 3 grams of fiber per 1/2 cup, quinoa is a good source of fiber, which also benefits people with diabetes. Eating more fiber-rich carbs improves blood sugar and l Continue reading >>

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

Is Quinoa A Good Grain For Diabetics To Eat?

Quinoa can be a healthy part of a diabetic diet. It's a whole-grain food that's high in protein and lower in carbohydrates compared to other grains. Quinoa also contains vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals that might help manage blood sugar levels and blood pressure, according to a study published in 2009 in the "Journal of Medicinal Food." Video of the Day Quinoa isn't technically a grain, it's a "pseudo-cereal" that's prepared and served as a grain and it has a similar nutritional profile according to the Whole Grains Council. The American Diabetes Association says that whole grains are acceptable for a diabetic diet and lists quinoa as one of the best choices. Quinoa can be prepared and served as a hot cereal, used cold in salads or served as a side dish. Continue reading >>

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Bread For People With Diabetes?

By Brandon May Bread is perhaps one of the most widely used types of food on the planet. It can also be a food that poses a health risk for people with diabetes. Despite the risk, bread can be one of the hardest foods to give up. Fortunately, there are breads on the market that don't raise blood sugar to extreme levels. Whole-grain breads with high-fiber ingredients, like oats and bran, may be the best option for people with diabetes. Making bread at home with specific, diabetes-friendly ingredients may also help reduce the impact bread has on blood sugar levels. The role of nutrition in controlling diabetes Diabetes has two main types: type 1 and type 2. People with type 1 diabetes have difficulty producing insulin, which is a hormone that "captures" blood sugar (or glucose) and transfers it into cells. Glucose is the preferred energy source for cells. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. This type of diabetes is also the easier form to prevent and manage with lifestyle changes and medication. According to the World Health Organization, over 422 million people have type 2 diabetes worldwide. In the earlier phase of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas can produce insulin, but cells have become insensitive to its effects. This is sometimes due to poor diet, genetics, and lifestyle habits. Because of this, cells can't access blood sugar following a meal. Nutrition plays a crucial role in diabetes control. It's only through putting proper dietary planning into practice that good blood sugar management can be accomplished. A good diet must also be combined with lifestyle changes and medication. A carbohydrate is one of the three major nutrients essential to human health. However, carbohydrates also raise blood sugar and can reduce effective diabetes control. This Continue reading >>

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Grains Of Goodness: A Closer Look

Eaten as a staple food across many parts of the world, grains exist in our diets in many forms, offering an important source of energy. It’s common knowledge that whole grains are good for us, from rice and wheat, to barley and quinoa. Much of the nutrient goodness of grains are found in the bran and germ of the seed, which is why it’s important to eat grains without these parts being milled off first – this is what the term ‘whole grain’ refers to. Grains in your diet Whole grains are wonderfully versatile – add them to salads for texture, bulk up a soup or stew, blend them in burgers or use directly as a meat alternative, or combine them whole in baked goods. They aren’t hard to include in your everyday eating routine and a little whole grain goes a long way! Packed with nutrients What do wholegrains contain? Fibre B vitamins Folic acid Essential fatty acids Protein Antioxidants Micro-nutrients Cooking with grains Cooking most grains is very similar to cooking rice – simply add the dry grain to a pan of water or broth, bring to a boil, then turn down the heat and simmer until the liquid has been absorbed. For a healthy boost of nutrients,experiment with different grains in different forms to bring variety to your meals. Which grain to choose? Amaranth With roughly 60 varieties in total, amaranth is not technically a grain but is of similar nutrition value and usage. These tiny grains have a slightly peppery flavour and can be cooked in water, popped like corn or added to baked goods to increase protein content. Barley For those seeking high fibre, you don’t get much better than barley. Often found as a flour, barley makes a closely textured bread with a slightly sweet flavour. Buckwheat Related to rhubarb, buckwheat is also not a grain as such, but i Continue reading >>

Whole Grains And Diabetes

Whole Grains And Diabetes

Be on The Lookout For Rubbish Information rubbish articles like this, which are everywhere written by a dietitian, someone that should have their facts straight. The beginning of the articles says: YES, type 1 and type 2 diabetics should eat whole grains. But it then goes on to give research based on reducing risk and how carbs are the thing that has the biggest impact on blood sugar so IT DOESN'T MAKE SENSE! That's just bad information in my opinion. Are people actually thinking about this when they write things? I just feel like people are insulting your intelligence. Seriously, if you had the right information would you work to change your diet? I bet you would because you want to feel better. Just because people do commonly consume grains doesn't mean they have to. And it also doesn't mean we should keep recommending it just because that's what people commonly eat! Diabetics want, and more importantly need to know what to eat to improve their health, period! Sure, it's tough to get to the bottom of it. But, can these dietitians and health organizations just stop regurgitating the status quo and present a properly constructed evidence based argument? Anyway, now that I've said my bit, let's get back on point. Evidence Behind Whole Grains for Diabetes TREATMENT There is VERY limited evidence that whole grains are actually good for diabetic treatment. study took 11 obese subjects (note these are not diabetic and 11 is a very small study). The people had hyperinsulinemia meaning they had insulin resistance and were prediabetic. They did find that insulin was 10% lower in the whole grain diet compared to the refined grain diet (well it doesn't take science to reach that conclusion). common argument is that grains are low glycemic index (GI) and low GI helps diabetes. Ag Continue reading >>

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Breads For People With Diabetes?

Is bread an option for people with diabetes? Food may be one of life’s simple pleasures, but for people with diabetes, deciding what to eat can get complicated. Foods that contain a lot of carbohydrates can spike blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates are found in many different kinds of food, including desserts, grains, and bread. Giving up carbs completely isn’t realistic, healthy, or even necessary. What matters is that you’re aware of your carb intake and make nutritious food choices. Breads can often be high in carbs. Some are overly processed, high in sugar, and filled with empty calories. Healthier options can be part of a satisfying meal plan for people with diabetes. If you’re trying to figure out which breads work best for diabetes management, this information may help. When a person has diabetes, their body doesn’t make or use enough insulin to process food efficiently. Without enough insulin, blood sugar levels can spike. People with diabetes may also have high levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. This means that it’s important to keep an eye on fat and sugar intake. People with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections daily and follow a specific type of eating plan. This eating plan is geared towards keeping blood sugar levels low. People with type 2 diabetes often follow an eating and exercise regimen geared towards reducing blood sugar. If diet and exercise aren’t enough to control blood sugar, insulin injections or oral medication may be a part of a daily regimen. Creating a food plan, making smart nutritional choices, and watching carbohydrate intake is recommended for people with both types of diabetes. Creating a meal plan can help people with diabetes control blood sugar and provide satisfying nutrition. There isn’t a one-size-fits-a Continue reading >>

The Best Grains For Diabetics

The Best Grains For Diabetics

As those with diabetes know, limiting carbohydrates, especially grains, is an important dietary step in maintaining healthy blood sugar levels. However, when you do decide to enjoy a grain dish, there are a few options that will not only keep you on your path to recovery, but also provide you with an array of nutrients and health benefits. Overall, consuming carbohydrates that have been processed/refined (stripped of all their vitamins, minerals, fibers and other nutrients) to make white varieties of rice, pasta, bread, bagels, crackers and cookies can cause extreme ups and downs in blood sugar levels, overwork the liver and pancreas, and rob the body of existing vitamins and minerals such as calcium and magnesium from its storage banks in order to break down and digest the food properly. Low glycemic, complex, whole grains such as buckwheat, amaranth, millet, brown rice, quinoa and kamut are ideal choices for those with a stable inner physiology. Each one described below contains many key nutritional properties that can be helpful in both the prevention and management of diabetes. Buckwheat: This "grain" actually comes from a fruit seed making it an ideal food for those with gluten sensitivities and diabetes. Research findings have shown that buckwheat can actually lower blood sugar levels. Buckwheat is high in magnesium, phytonutrients, and dietary fiber. Amaranth: Also a non-gluten "grain", amaranth is high in protein (15-18%) and contains more calcium than milk. It’s rich in amino acids and contains more lysine than any other grain. It’s also a great source of fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. Millet: This energy producing grain provides 26.4% of the daily value for magnesium, a co-factor for the enzymes involved in insulin secretion Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Five Common Grain Myths

Five Common Grain Myths

There’s a good chance that, at one point or another, you’ve wondered about eating certain foods. If you have diabetes, foods that contain carbohydrate (also known as carb) come to mind. And one type of carb food that never fails to spark debate is grains. There’s the camp that disparages most grains, in general, proclaiming that they’re bad for diabetes because they’ll send your blood sugars sky-high. On the more moderate side of things, the argument is that refined grains are to be avoided, but whole grains are OK (in limited amounts). And then there’s the rest of the folks who feel thoroughly confused. Is it OK to eat pasta? What the heck is farro, anyway? Read on to learn more. Whole grains defined According to the Oldways Whole Grains Council, a whole grain has “all three parts of the original grain — the starchy endosperm, the fiber-rich bran, and the germ.” The bran is the outer layer of the grain; the germ is the “embryo,” which contains B vitamins, vitamin E, phytonutrients, antioxidants, and fat, and the endosperm is the germ’s food source that contains carbohydrate, protein, and some vitamins and minerals. Once a food manufacturer starts stripping away any part of a whole grain, it’s no longer, well, whole. Now it’s refined. And that’s when the grain starts to lose many of its healthy attributes. Whole-grain myths People who have diabetes should avoid all grains and grain foods. This particular fallacy stems from the fact that grains contain carbohydrate. Carbohydrate (in many people’s minds) is bad. They raise your blood sugar, right? So, stay away from them. But, it’s not that simple, at least when it comes to grains. As we just learned, whole grains are packed with nutrition — carb, yes, but also some protein, fat, vitami Continue reading >>

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

Get To Know 6 Great Grains

By Tracey Neithercott; Recipes by Robyn Webb, MS, LN If you're still spreading peanut butter and jelly on colorless Wonder bread or heaping your stir-fry on top of a pile of Uncle Ben's, it's time to wean yourself off the refined stuff and explore whole grains. Kudos to you if you've already made this trade-in; whole grains are higher in nutrients and will raise your blood glucose less than their refined counterparts do. Plus, unlike refined grains, they may protect your heart and help you maintain weight loss. The reason for the nutritional disparity between refined carbohydrates and whole grains lies in the processing. Whole grains contain an outer bran layer, a middle endosperm, and inner germ, but refined grains are stripped of everythingincluding protein and many key nutrientssave for the endosperm. Because they're less processed, whole grains have a lower glycemic index value than refined grains. Another point in the whole-grains column is their relatively high fiber content, which can help lower cholesterol levels, control blood glucose, and keep you feeling full long after eating. "It's really important to eat foods that are going to fill you up and not leave you hungry an hour later," so you don't binge post-meal, says Elisa Zied, MS, RD, CDN, a registered dietitian-nutritionist and author of the book Nutrition at Your Fingertips. Zied suggests gradually replacing your current processed foods, such as regular pretzels, with whole grains like air-popped popcorn (sans butter, of course, and not the microwave stuff). "You just really have to be aware," she says. "You need to think, 'Where am I willing to compromise?' " Many of these grains can be cooked just as you prepare rice. To do this, boil water or stocklook to your grain's packaging for grain-to-liquid rat Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Whole Grains

Diabetes And Whole Grains

Whole grains are found in wheat, oats, barley, maize and brown rice People with diabetes are often advised to eat a good selection of whole grain food. However, people are often confused as to what counts as whole grain. Much of the produce which many of us have grown up with consists of refined wheat products lacking very much of the nutrition within better whole grain equivalents. If you have wheat or grain based foods, try to find whole grain varieties. They will be better for your sugar levels as well as your health in general. Whole grain foods are found in cereals such as wheat, oats, barley, maize, rye and brown rice, amongst others. The grain is made up of three constituent parts: Germ: the germ is the reproductive part of the grain and is packed with nutrients Endosperm: accounts for about 80% of the grain, this is the starchy part Bran: the fibre rich outside (shell) of the grain Much food sold these days is made from highly refined flour and wheat products. The more refined the food is, the less nutrition it carries. White bread for example is made from highly refined flour which has very little nutritional value as the refining process strips out much of the vitamins. Furthermore, products that are highly refined, such as white bread, are very quickly turned into glucose by the body and therefore they are best avoided by those with diabetes . For food to count as whole grain, it should include each of the three parts (germ, endosperm and bran). However, shop produce can make it very difficult to tell what is actually whole grain. Be wary of terms like wholemeal, granary and multigrain as these offer no guarantee that the bread is made from whole grains. Look instead for use of the term whole grain or wholegrain. As a general guide, look for items such as th Continue reading >>

How To Add Whole Grains To Your Diet

How To Add Whole Grains To Your Diet

Having diabetes doesn't mean you need to give up every piece of bread or dish of pasta. You can still enjoy foods made with grains, as long as you make them whole grains. Whole grains are packed with fiber, which can help lower your cholesterol and reduce your heart disease risk . Fiber slows digestion and the absorption of carbohydrates and may not raise your blood sugar as quickly as refined grains. And because whole grains help you feel fuller for longer, they can help you manage your weight . Although its best to get fiber from food sources such as whole grains, fiber supplements can also help you increase your fiber intake. Examples include psyllium and methylcellulose. Be sure to increase your fiber intake slowly to help prevent gas and cramping. Its also important to also increase the amount of liquids that you drink. The easiest way to eat more whole grains is to make a few switches in your diet, such as swapping out white bread and rice for whole wheat bread and brown rice. Also, try these tips: Add grains like barley and bulgur wheat to soups, stews, salads, and casseroles to add texture. When you bake breads or muffins, instead of white flour use half whole wheat flour and half oat, amaranth, or buckwheat flour. You can also use these whole-grain flours in pancakes and waffles. Instead of having crackers for a snack, eat popcorn, which is a whole grain. Just skip the butter and salt. Unsweetened whole-grain cereal makes another good snack option. Make quinoa your side dish instead of rice. You can also use quinoa as a coating for shrimp and chicken instead of flour or breadcrumbs. Finding whole-grain foods in your supermarket can be tricky. Some foods that appear to contain whole grains really dont. You need to look carefully at food labels. Don't be fooled Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been tolda diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beansbut you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium.(Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes , shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the diseaseand even reverse it.) Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of carbohydrates. Bonus: They have more than 20% of your daily value of vitamin K, manganese Continue reading >>

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