diabetestalk.net

What Is The Best Cereal For A Diabetic?

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

No matter what type of diabetes you have, keeping your blood glucose levels within a healthy range is crucial. And starting the day with a healthy breakfast is one step you can take to achieve that. Breakfast should be a balanced meal with adequate protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. It should also be low in added sugar and high in fiber and nutrients. If you have diabetes, you may already be familiar with the glycemic index (GI). The GI is a way to measure how quickly foods with carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates give you the energy you need to start your day. But digesting carbohydrates too quickly can cause your blood sugar levels to spike. Foods with a low GI are easier on your body than those with a high GI. They are digested more slowly and minimize spikes after meals. This is something to keep in mind when choosing breakfast cereals. It is important to know what things affect the GI. Processing, cooking methods, and the type of grain can all impact how quickly the food is digested. Cereals that are more processed tend to have a higher GI even if they have fiber added to them. Mixing foods can also affect the GI. Having protein and health fats with your cereal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar. A healthy breakfast that’s easy to prepare can be as simple as a bowl of cereal, provided you choose wisely. The grocery store cereal aisle is stacked high with cereals that satisfy your sweet tooth but sabotage your glucose levels. Many of the most popular cereals have refined grains and sugars at the top of the ingredient lists. Those cereals have few nutrients and lots of empty calories. They can also cause a spike in your blood glucose levels. That’s why it’s important to read labels carefully. Look for cereals that list a whole gra Continue reading >>

Diabetes Super Foods

Diabetes Super Foods

Eating right is key to managing diabetes. Fortunately, your food “prescription” includes filling, flavorful fare that tastes like anything but medicine. A diet rich in these 10 “super foods” will help minimize blood sugar and even throw your disease into reverse. Dig in! 1. Vegetables. The advantages of eating more vegetables are undeniable. Packed with powerhouse nutrients, vegetables are naturally low in calories, and they’re full of fiber, so they’re plenty filling. Loading your plate with more vegetables will automatically mean you’re eating fewer simple carbs (which raise blood sugar) and saturated fats (which increase insulin resistance). Aim to get four or five servings a day. (A serving is 1/2 cup canned or cooked vegetables or 1 cup raw vegetables.) Go easier on starchy vegetables — including potatoes and corn, and legumes such as lima beans and peas — which are higher in calories than other vegetables. 2. Fruit. It has more natural sugar and calories than most vegetables, so you can’t eat it with utter abandon, but fruit has almost all the advantages that vegetables do — it’s brimming with nutrients you need, it’s low in fat, it’s high in fiber, and it’s relatively low in calories compared with most other foods. Best of all, it’s loaded with antioxidants that help protect your nerves, your eyes, and your heart. Aim to get three or four servings a day. (A serving is one piece of whole fruit, 1/2 cup cooked or canned fruit, or 1 cup raw fruit.) Strive to make most of your fruit servings real produce, not juice. Many of the nutrients and a lot of the fiber found in the skin, flesh, and seeds of fruit are eliminated during juicing, and the calories and sugar are concentrated in juice. 3. Beans. Beans are just about your best source Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals

Breakfast Cereals

What's in your bowl? Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. The breakfast of champions When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... What's in a cereal? Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they ne Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Cereals And Diabetes: A Rundown Of The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Options

Cereals And Diabetes: A Rundown Of The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Options

The variety of sugar content in cereal makes it a signficant food choice for everyone with diabetes. Cereals with the lowest sugar content are naturally much better for people with diabetes, and it can be surprising just much sugar is packed in some well-known brands. Because cereals are grains, and consequently high in carbohydrates, all cereals are likely to raise your blood glucose levels. Therefore, it’s best to limit your portion sizes to no more than the recommended size, which should be listed on each cereal box. Editor’s note: If you are following a low-carb diet, you could visit the Low Carb Program for healthier breakfast ideas. To commemorate National Cereal Day over in the US, we’ve looked at some of the most popular breakfast cereals in the UK and surveyed the carbs and sugar content per 100g. To help make this information easier to digest, we’ve grouped each cereal into the healthiest and unhealthiest options. Right, on with the list. The healthiest cereals, per 100g To discover more healthy breakfast recipes, check out 12 Deliciously Tasty Low Carb Breakfasts. You can also visit the Food, Recipes and Nutrition forum. Continue reading >>

Cereal For Breakfast: 7 Ways To Make It Healthy

Cereal For Breakfast: 7 Ways To Make It Healthy

7 Tips for Choosing the Best Breakfast Cereal Nothing says quick and easy breakfast like a bowl of cereal. When youre shopping the cereal aisle, it can be puzzling to find the healthiest options, especially if youre buying with a health condition in mind, like type 2 diabetes , heart disease , high blood pressure , or cholesterol . The first rule: Skip over the descriptions or health claims you see on the front of a package. Thats where manufacturers place most of their marketing, says Lori Zanini, a dietitian and diabetes educator in Los Angeles. Her advice: Flip to the nutrition label, where the facts are located. Once youre reading the right part of the box, keep these tips in mind: A serving size of cereal can vary from 1/2 cup to more than one cup. Most people eat more than that. "Aim for a cereal that has 200 calories or less per serving, says Kristen Smith, RD, a dietitian for the WellStar Comprehensive Bariatric Program in Atlanta. Use a measuring cup to keep yourself honest, and stick to the recommended serving size. Refined grains have been stripped of fiber and nutrients . Only some, but typically not all, of the nutrients are added back, and unfortunately, not the fiber, Smith says. A smarter choice: whole grains like wheat, brown rice, and corn, which keep the entire grain kernel. Whole grains provide a substantial amount of vitamins and minerals, which help your body function, Smith says. They also reduce the risk of heart disease , and because they take longer to digest, will make you feel fuller, longer. Look for key first ingredients like 100% whole wheat, oats, or another grain, as well as a yellow stamp on the package from the Whole Grains Council. If the box says Whole Grain, then at least half the grain ingredients are whole. If it says 100% it mea Continue reading >>

High-fiber Cereal May Ward Off Diabetes

High-fiber Cereal May Ward Off Diabetes

June 18, 2004 -- Eating a bowlful of high-fiber cereal may help prevent type 2 diabetes and other health problems in people at risk for developing the disease. A new study showed eating a high-fiber cereal lowered insulin production and reduced blood glucose levels in men with elevated insulin levels, a condition known as hyperinsulinemia. People with hyperinsulinemia are in danger of developing type 2 diabetes because the cells in their bodies are resistant to the effects of insulin and cannot process glucose (sugar) properly. This causes the pancreas to produce more insulin in order to compensate. High insulin levels and insulin resistance have also been associated with an increased risk of heart disease. By lowering the rise in insulin and sugar levels that normally follows eating a meal high in carbohydrates, researchers say people at risk for developing diabetes may be able to ward off the disease and its complications. Other research has shown that exercise and the diabetes medication Glucophage are also effective at preventing diabetes in these people. In the study, which appears in the June issue of Diabetes Care, researchers compared the effects of eating a high- or low-fiber ready-to-eat breakfast cereal in 77 men without diabetes. Forty-two of the men had elevated insulin levels. The men in the high-fiber cereal group ate 1.3 cups of cereal -- Fiber One from General Mills -- which provided nearly 36 grams of fiber. The low-fiber cereal group ate Country Corn Flakes from General Mills which had less than 1 gram of fiber in the 1-cup serving size. The men with hyperinsulinemia were significantly heavier and had larger waistlines as well as lower HDL "good" cholesterol levels than the others. Being overweight is one of the biggest risk factors for diabetes, and Continue reading >>

10 Low-sugar Breakfast Cereals That Don't Taste Like Twigs

10 Low-sugar Breakfast Cereals That Don't Taste Like Twigs

Tastes Like: Un-junked Capn Crunch. Crunchy pillows come with a hint of molasses. Healthy Bonus: Made with non-GMO corn bran that's also high in fiber. One serving has 5 grams, or 20% of your daily needs. Tastes Like: A heartier, crunchier version of Honey Nut Cheerios. Healthy Bonus: Packs an impressive 4 grams of protein per serving. Tastes Like: A little bit of summer, thanks to sweet-tart, freeze-dried blueberries and blackberries mixed into crispy corn flakes. Healthy Bonus: Organic berries add a toxin-free antioxidant boost. Tastes Like: The slightest hint of sugar, encapsulated in light-as-air corn puffs. Healthy Bonus: Just 66 calories in each cup. Sweet Stats: 0.75 g sugar per c serving Tastes Like: Toasted oats with an addictively crunchy-crispy texture. Healthy Bonus: Cheerios recently went non-GMO. Tastes Like: Warm brown sugar. And nostalgia. Healthy Bonus: Provides 1 gram of soluble fiber, or one-third the amount you need daily in order to lower cholesterol. Tastes Like: Chex, but with a hint of maple. Healthy Bonus: Only 8 ingredientsand most are organic. Tastes Like: Subtle vanilla sweetness plays off of nutty add-ins like quinoa, millet, and oat bran. Healthy Bonus: Delivers 7 grams each of protein and fiber per serving. Tastes Like: Sturdy Os with an almost-savory flavor: they're made with a blend of navy beans, lentils, and garbanzos. Healthy Bonus: Boosts breakfast with 6 grams of protein per serving. Continue reading >>

5 Great Cereals To Avoid High Blood Sugar

5 Great Cereals To Avoid High Blood Sugar

I really love eating breakfast. Not only is it the most important meal of the day, but there are so many great things to eat! Since I had a baby almost a year ago (which I can’t believe, but that’s a whole other post!), cereal seems to be the easiest choice. Unfortunately, my blood sugar usually jumps way up into orbit after this typically high carb meal. So what to do? After much experimentation, I found a few cereals that are easy on the blood sugars, delicious, and satisfying. Steel cut oatmeal. A lot of people with diabetes complain that oatmeal spikes their blood sugar. I’ve had this problem as well, but the problem usually isn’t the oatmeal itself, it’s what I put on it. I’ve also noticed that when I eat steel cut oatmeal vs. the quick cook versions my blood sugar isn’t as compromised. I sprinkle a couple berries on top and add some milk and I’ve got a delicious breakfast. The carbs are high, yes, but if I take the right amount of insulin, I’m all good. Weetablx. I’ve been eating Weetabix since I was a kid. It’s not your typical breakfast cereal. Instead of being flakes or clusters, Weetabix is more biscuit like. You pour milk on top, and it becomes soft and delicious. Weetabix is something that I craved while pregnant last year. I love everything about it! I eat two biscuits for breakfast, which is 28g of carbs, without milk. No Sugar Familia Museli. This is also a cereal from my childhood, and it’s also one that I feed my baby girl. Although she eats the baby version! This has been my typical breakfast as of late and I’ve had no spikes to report at all! This cereal comes in a few varieties, so if you’re going to try it out, make sure that you buy the no-sugar variety. Puffed Rice. Boring? I don’t think so. It’s got a different tex Continue reading >>

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Raise your hand if you currently eat or have ever eaten cereal. I wouldn’t be surprised if most of you raised your hand. Back in 2005, Good Morning America conducted a poll and found that 60% of Americans eat breakfast, and of those 60%, about 40% eat either hot or cold cereal. I’m a big breakfast cereal eater, mostly because it’s fast and easy, but also because I like it. People eat cereal at any time of day, too — it’s not just for breakfast anymore. And if you’re a Seinfeld fan, you probably remember the episode when Jerry’s girlfriend ate cereal for all three meals. All sorts of studies have been done looking at how breakfast impacts various factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol, as well as alertness and productivity. And starting off the day by eating cereal is a smart way to help meet your fiber and whole-grain goals (most of us fall short on these). Did you know, too, that eating a whole-grain breakfast cereal can help reduce your risk of heart failure, and is a smart way to prevent accumulating fat around your midsection (also known as the dreaded spare tire)? Decisions, Decisions So, eating breakfast is good. Eating cereal is also good with one caveat: you need to choose a cereal that’s healthy. But how? The cereal aisle in the supermarket can be overwhelming. You know you should choose something that’s high in nutrition, but the worry is that the cereal will taste like packing peanuts. Must one sacrifice flavor for health? Choosing Wisely Here are some tips that can help: Read the Nutrition Facts label. Information on the front of the box can be misleading. For example, a cereal claiming to be “low in sugar” might not be so healthful in terms of fat, whole grains, or sodium. The label and the ingredi Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

The majority of dietitians and hospital dietary info. will suggest a suitable diabetic breakfast being breakfast cereal such as Weetabix, Bran flakes, All Bran, Shreddies, Shredded Wheat, Granola, No added sugar Muesli, or porridge oats. High fibre and low in fat, covered with a helping of lactose (milk) and sometimes they like to advise to add a helping of fructose (fruit) on top too.... so a high carb cereal covered in carbs and more carbs. Carb overload! We have learnt through experience that it is very rare for ladies to be able to tolerate these cereals throughout a pregnancy when diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Many will be able to tolerate them earlier in pregnancy, when insulin resistance has not yet peaked. Then as the pregnancy progresses and insulin resistance increases, overnight, a cereal which was once tolerated often raises levels very high (spikes), usually into double figures, hence we named breakfast cereal GD kryptonite! Sometimes ladies are able to move onto things like porridge oats which are low GI, but for many all cereals become an intolerable food which has to be forgotten until baby is born. For this reason, cereal becomes a craving food for many ladies with gestational diabetes. We see many ladies being told that they should be able to tolerate cereal and that they should continue to try and ultimately this results in them being medicated, or doses of medication or insulin being increased in order to control the sugar hit from the cereals. If it's not broken then you don't need to fix it! If breakfast cereal works for you then that's great. Don't stop eating it if it is not causing you any problems, but eat it in the knowledge that tolerance to it can change (literally overnight) and please be careful if advising others with gestational d Continue reading >>

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

Top 10 Healthiest Low Carb Cereals

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 4 Comments Would you like to find cereal options with fewer carbohydrates so that you can have some fruit or milk  in the morning without breaking the carb bank? Do higher carbohydrate cereals run your blood sugars up every time you eat them? We can help. We’ve put together a list of the top 10 healthiest and lowest carbohydrate options for diabetes. Whether you are on an American Diabetes Association (ADA) Diet or a Ketogenic diet, you can enjoy them with diabetes guilt free. If you are on a ketogenic diet, we hope that you are being followed by your doctor and nutritionist for needed lab work. Which cereals made our list of the top 10 healthiest for diabetes? We will break down each product for you that we’ve listed in the table below. You can find them on Amazon by clicking the link. You may also find some of these brands at your local grocery store. They are all made from plant sources including nuts and seeds that have a high fiber content. A high fiber content cancels out natural sugars and helps people with diabetes manage their blood sugars. High fiber foods are great for diabetes due to their low Glycemic Index. They don’t raise blood sugars as fast as non-fiber foods do. You will experience stability of blood sugars more often when you eat high fiber foods. They are granola cereals. If you don’t like granola, hang on until the end of the article and we will provide you with some grain-based choices. While higher in carbohydrates, the ones on our grain-based list are high in fiber also. These will be found in your community grocery store, so we won’t link those to Amazon. We know you will find a healthy breakfast option that also tastes delicious while helping you to manage your diabetes after you have read this a Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

The Five Best Cereals For Blood Sugar

The Five Best Cereals For Blood Sugar

Breakfast cereals are notoriously high in sugar. However, if you read the labels carefully you will be able to find several healthy cereals to jumpstart your day and still keep your diabetes under control. Oatmeal: One of the best cereal choices for people with diabetes is oatmeal. It is high in soluble fiber and naturally low in sugar. There is also research to suggest that oatmeal lowers cholesterol. If you are buying instant oatmeal, try to avoid the brands with added sugar. Barbara’s Honey Rice Puffins: Even though this cereal has the word “honey” in the name, it is actually a pretty good (and yummy) choice. This cereal is made from whole grain brown rice and is a gluten free option - if that is necessary in your diet. Rice Puffins come in at 6 grams of sugar and 1.5 grams of fat per serving. General Mills Multi Grain Cheerios: This cereal is made with five different whole grains. It has 6 grams of sugar and only 1 gram of fat. Cheerios taste great and are also gluten free. Fiber One: Coming in at 0 grams of sugar and only 2 grams of fat, this cereal is also a good choice. It is high in fiber, which can help with weight management. Fiber One has only 60 calories per serving so it can also be a good choice if you are also watching calories. Kix: Even though this sounds like one of those sugary kids’ cereal, it actually has only 3 grams of sugar and 1 gram of fat. Kix also delivers 13 grams of whole grain corn in each serving. When choosing a cereal, remember that all cereals are not created equal. You should always read the label and look for a breakfast cereal that is low in sugar and high in fiber. With all cereals, be careful of the portion size. One serving is usually equal to about 3/4 of a cup of dry cereal. See More Helpful Articles: Tracy Davenport, P Continue reading >>

Low Carb Cereal Is There One?

Low Carb Cereal Is There One?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Surely I can't keep having bacon n eggs, or fry up for brekkie. I'm not mad on yoghurt but especially at 6am. Is there any low carb ish muesli, cereal or whatever I can try or make - oh and bread I could make that's doesn't have linseed in . You may get fed up of bacon and eggs, how about an omelette with prawns, scrambled eggs with smoked salmon. The only way to know if you can tolerate porridge is to test. Cereals are usually made of junk anyway - its processed. I believe if you search IanD's porridge you'll find a recipe to make your own. I've seen some low carb cookbooks have suggestions but they do usually have linseeds in them (foul things!) Rose Elliot has a granola recipe which might be worth trying without the linseeds. It has coconut, seeds and almonds otherwise. Perhaps you could mix them together and experiment? That would be muesli-ish. (Actually I might try it myself now I've thought of it). Which might make a nice breakfast with cream and fruit? Sunspots many thanks, I shall try those scones, I like smoked salmon as well. Talking of ground almond, I have gone through 1kg bag in 4 weeks and 1/4 way through the 2nd bag lol. I bought mine from worldwide foods in rusholme, Manchester, 7.49 a kilo bag, coconut flour was 2 odd and huge bags of loads of other nuts, no linseed / flax seed tho. Ooh likewise bread. There are loads of different recipes online, many without linseeds!) I haven't tried any yet, but I have browsed them. There's a recipe for scones here Which might make a nice breakfast with cream and fruit? I make granola. Get a mixture of nuts and seeds, whack them in the food processor, mix with desicated coconut and ground linseed. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes