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What Is The Best Breakfast Cereal For Diabetics To Eat?

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

When you’re in a morning rush, you may not have time to eat anything but a quick bowl of cereal. But many brands of breakfast cereal are loaded with fast-digesting carbohydrates. These carbs usually rate high on the glycemic index. That means your body quickly breaks them down, which rapidly raises your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, that can be dangerous. Fortunately, not all cereals are made the same. Read on to learn about diabetes-friendly cereal options that can get you out of the door quickly, without putting you through a blood sugar rollercoaster ride. We’ve listed our recommendations from the highest rating on the glycemic index to the lowest rating. The glycemic index, or GI, measures how quickly carbohydrates raise your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it’s best to choose foods with lower GI ratings. They take longer to digest, which can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: low-GI foods have a rating of 55 or less medium-GI foods have a rating of 56-69 high-GI foods have a rating of 70-100 Mixing foods can influence how they digest and adsorb into your blood, and ultimately their GI rating. For example, eating high-ranked GI cereal with Greek yogurt, nuts, or other low-ranked GI foods can slow your digestion and limit spikes in your blood sugar. Glycemic load is another measure of how food affects your blood sugar. It takes into account portion size and the digestibility of different carbohydrates. It may be a better way to identify good and bad carb choices. For example, carrots have a high GI rating but a low glycemic load. The vegetable provides a healthy choice for people with diabetes. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: a glycemic load under 10 is low a glycemi Continue reading >>

Cereal For Breakfast: 7 Ways To Make It Healthy

Cereal For Breakfast: 7 Ways To Make It Healthy

7 Tips for Choosing the Best Breakfast Cereal Nothing says quick and easy breakfast like a bowl of cereal. When youre shopping the cereal aisle, it can be puzzling to find the healthiest options, especially if youre buying with a health condition in mind, like type 2 diabetes , heart disease , high blood pressure , or cholesterol . The first rule: Skip over the descriptions or health claims you see on the front of a package. Thats where manufacturers place most of their marketing, says Lori Zanini, a dietitian and diabetes educator in Los Angeles. Her advice: Flip to the nutrition label, where the facts are located. Once youre reading the right part of the box, keep these tips in mind: A serving size of cereal can vary from 1/2 cup to more than one cup. Most people eat more than that. "Aim for a cereal that has 200 calories or less per serving, says Kristen Smith, RD, a dietitian for the WellStar Comprehensive Bariatric Program in Atlanta. Use a measuring cup to keep yourself honest, and stick to the recommended serving size. Refined grains have been stripped of fiber and nutrients . Only some, but typically not all, of the nutrients are added back, and unfortunately, not the fiber, Smith says. A smarter choice: whole grains like wheat, brown rice, and corn, which keep the entire grain kernel. Whole grains provide a substantial amount of vitamins and minerals, which help your body function, Smith says. They also reduce the risk of heart disease , and because they take longer to digest, will make you feel fuller, longer. Look for key first ingredients like 100% whole wheat, oats, or another grain, as well as a yellow stamp on the package from the Whole Grains Council. If the box says Whole Grain, then at least half the grain ingredients are whole. If it says 100% it mea Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals

Breakfast Cereals

What's in your bowl? Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. The breakfast of champions When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... What's in a cereal? Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they ne Continue reading >>

5 Great Cereals To Avoid High Blood Sugar

5 Great Cereals To Avoid High Blood Sugar

I really love eating breakfast. Not only is it the most important meal of the day, but there are so many great things to eat! Since I had a baby almost a year ago (which I can’t believe, but that’s a whole other post!), cereal seems to be the easiest choice. Unfortunately, my blood sugar usually jumps way up into orbit after this typically high carb meal. So what to do? After much experimentation, I found a few cereals that are easy on the blood sugars, delicious, and satisfying. Steel cut oatmeal. A lot of people with diabetes complain that oatmeal spikes their blood sugar. I’ve had this problem as well, but the problem usually isn’t the oatmeal itself, it’s what I put on it. I’ve also noticed that when I eat steel cut oatmeal vs. the quick cook versions my blood sugar isn’t as compromised. I sprinkle a couple berries on top and add some milk and I’ve got a delicious breakfast. The carbs are high, yes, but if I take the right amount of insulin, I’m all good. Weetablx. I’ve been eating Weetabix since I was a kid. It’s not your typical breakfast cereal. Instead of being flakes or clusters, Weetabix is more biscuit like. You pour milk on top, and it becomes soft and delicious. Weetabix is something that I craved while pregnant last year. I love everything about it! I eat two biscuits for breakfast, which is 28g of carbs, without milk. No Sugar Familia Museli. This is also a cereal from my childhood, and it’s also one that I feed my baby girl. Although she eats the baby version! This has been my typical breakfast as of late and I’ve had no spikes to report at all! This cereal comes in a few varieties, so if you’re going to try it out, make sure that you buy the no-sugar variety. Puffed Rice. Boring? I don’t think so. It’s got a different tex Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Continue reading >>

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

No matter what type of diabetes you have, keeping your blood glucose levels within a healthy range is crucial. And starting the day with a healthy breakfast is one step you can take to achieve that. Breakfast should be a balanced meal with adequate protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. It should also be low in added sugar and high in fiber and nutrients. If you have diabetes, you may already be familiar with the glycemic index (GI). The GI is a way to measure how quickly foods with carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates give you the energy you need to start your day. But digesting carbohydrates too quickly can cause your blood sugar levels to spike. Foods with a low GI are easier on your body than those with a high GI. They are digested more slowly and minimize spikes after meals. This is something to keep in mind when choosing breakfast cereals. It is important to know what things affect the GI. Processing, cooking methods, and the type of grain can all impact how quickly the food is digested. Cereals that are more processed tend to have a higher GI even if they have fiber added to them. Mixing foods can also affect the GI. Having protein and health fats with your cereal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar. A healthy breakfast that’s easy to prepare can be as simple as a bowl of cereal, provided you choose wisely. The grocery store cereal aisle is stacked high with cereals that satisfy your sweet tooth but sabotage your glucose levels. Many of the most popular cereals have refined grains and sugars at the top of the ingredient lists. Those cereals have few nutrients and lots of empty calories. They can also cause a spike in your blood glucose levels. That’s why it’s important to read labels carefully. Look for cereals that list a whole gra Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

12 Breakfast Rules For Diabetes

First, eat it iStock/EasyBuy4u Even if your blood sugar is high in the morning, don't skip breakfast. Research shows that forgoing a morning meal increases the risk for obesity and insulin resistance. And studies confirm that breakfast eaters are better able to resist fatty and high-calorie foods later in the day. Aim to eat your breakfast at the same time every day, since keeping your blood sugar levels even throughout the day means eating consistently from day to day. Try to incorporate these healthy carbs for diabetes into your breakfast. iStock/ShotShare You can't (and shouldn't) avoid restaurants altogether, but there's one meal you should almost always eat at home: breakfast. Look at the alternatives: Diner-style breakfasts can include 1,000 calories or more with astronomical amounts of carbohydrates and fats. A healthy-sounding whole-wheat bagel with light cream cheese from a bagel shop may contain up to 67 grams of carbs, 450 calories, and 9 grams of fat. A sausage muffin may pack 29 grams of carbs, 370 calories, and 22 grams of fat. Compare those to a bowl of oatmeal (half a cup) with a half cup of fat-free milk, which contains a mere 12 grams of carbs, 195 calories, and 3 grams of fat. iStock/MarkGillow We assume you're already starting out with a cereal that contains at least 5 grams of fiber per serving. (Studies have found that people who regularly eat whole-grain cereal gain less weight than people who don't.) Make it even more diabetes-friendly by adding half a cup (one serving) of fresh fruit, such as strawberries or blueberries. Here's why fruit is healthy for diabetes (not forbidden!). Sprinkle 1 or 2 tablespoons of ground flaxseed on hot and cold cereal and yogurt iStock/Sasha Radosavljevic Rich in protein and fiber, these tiny seeds are a godsend to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

Mom is still right: Breakfast is the most important meal of the day, especially when you have type 2 diabetes. Your diabetes diet needs to give you a healthy supply of energy to jumpstart your body in the morning. "Remember that first thing in the morning, you’ve gone many hours without eating and your body needs fuel," says Kelly O'Connor, RD, director of diabetes education at the endocrinology center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "If you’re not giving it any, it will create its own in the form of stored blood sugar that gets released into your bloodstream — which often results in blood sugar that’s too high." Healthy breakfast food is also a must when it comes to diabetes control and weight management. “Remember that when your body is fasting, you’re not giving it any energy, so it slows down to conserve what it has left, which is counterproductive," O'Connor says. The trick is to keep your metabolism going all day long at a steady rate. "The simple solution to both of these issues is to eat a good breakfast," she says. Avoiding Breakfast Mistakes Breakfast blunders can happen during the week when you wake up late and try eating breakfast while running out the door, or on the weekend when you go out for a big breakfast. However, the biggest mistake to avoid is skipping breakfast altogether. When you go too long without eating, your body goes into starvation mode. And when you finally give in to hunger later in the day (and probably overeat), your body will grab all the fat from your meal and store it. That's bad for anyone, especially for someone with type 2 diabetes. Here are some other breakfast mistakes to avoid: Don’t fly on a sugar high. If you don't have a lot of time in the morning for healthy breakfast foods, you may be tempted to wolf do Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals Ranked Best To Worst

Breakfast Cereals Ranked Best To Worst

We’ve ranked the most popular cereals from best to worst based on their nutritional value – in particular added sugar, fibre content, salt. Read on to get your day off to a heart-healthy start. 1. Porridge Porridge is our top choice for a heart healthy breakfast – when it is made with low-fat milk or water and unsweetened. All porridge oats are wholegrains and they all contain a soluble fibre called beta-glucan, which can help lower your cholesterol level if you have 3g or more of it daily, as part of a healthy diet. (A 40g serving of porridge oats contains 1.6g of beta-glucan.) As well as this, you’ll be getting the fibre from the whole grains, plus there is no added sugar or salt. Make sure you don’t add extra sugar or salt to your porridge as this will undo all your good work – instead, try adding a banana or some fruit for extra sweetness. For every 80g that you add it will be one of your 5-a-day at the same time. A serving of porridge made with 40g of oats and semi-skimmed milk contains: Energy 1016kJ / 241kcal, 12% of your Reference Intake (RI) Fat 6.2g, 9% of your RI Saturates 2.5g, 13% of your RI Sugars 8.2g, 9% of your RI Salt 0.2g, 3% of your RI A 40g serving of oats (not made up) contains: Energy 645kJ / 152kcal, 7.6% of your RI Fat 3.2g, 5% of your RI Saturates 0.5g, 2.6% of your RI Sugars 0.1g, 0.1% of your RI Salt <0.01g, <1% of your RI Our expert answers the question ‘Instant or traditional porridge?’ Try our 14 delicious heart-healthy porridge variations 2. No added sugar or salt muesli No added sugar muesli contains a mixture of grains, fruit and nuts and the combination will differ between brands and varieties so the amount of oat beta glucans will be more variable than porridge, which is made only of oats. The dried fruit that is added Continue reading >>

10 Low-sugar Breakfast Cereals That Don't Taste Like Twigs

10 Low-sugar Breakfast Cereals That Don't Taste Like Twigs

Tastes Like: Un-junked Capn Crunch. Crunchy pillows come with a hint of molasses. Healthy Bonus: Made with non-GMO corn bran that's also high in fiber. One serving has 5 grams, or 20% of your daily needs. Tastes Like: A heartier, crunchier version of Honey Nut Cheerios. Healthy Bonus: Packs an impressive 4 grams of protein per serving. Tastes Like: A little bit of summer, thanks to sweet-tart, freeze-dried blueberries and blackberries mixed into crispy corn flakes. Healthy Bonus: Organic berries add a toxin-free antioxidant boost. Tastes Like: The slightest hint of sugar, encapsulated in light-as-air corn puffs. Healthy Bonus: Just 66 calories in each cup. Sweet Stats: 0.75 g sugar per c serving Tastes Like: Toasted oats with an addictively crunchy-crispy texture. Healthy Bonus: Cheerios recently went non-GMO. Tastes Like: Warm brown sugar. And nostalgia. Healthy Bonus: Provides 1 gram of soluble fiber, or one-third the amount you need daily in order to lower cholesterol. Tastes Like: Chex, but with a hint of maple. Healthy Bonus: Only 8 ingredientsand most are organic. Tastes Like: Subtle vanilla sweetness plays off of nutty add-ins like quinoa, millet, and oat bran. Healthy Bonus: Delivers 7 grams each of protein and fiber per serving. Tastes Like: Sturdy Os with an almost-savory flavor: they're made with a blend of navy beans, lentils, and garbanzos. Healthy Bonus: Boosts breakfast with 6 grams of protein per serving. Continue reading >>

Healthy Breakfast Cereals

Healthy Breakfast Cereals

With shelves stacked top to bottom with hundreds of brightly coloured boxes competing for your attention, supermarket breakfast cereal aisles can sometimes feel like walking through a minefield. Make the wrong choice and you or your child could end up with a breakfast cereal high in sugar, fat or salt. If eaten too often, this can contribute to weight gain and health problems, including tooth decay and high blood pressure. But whether it's puffed, baked or flaked, cereal can still form part of a healthy, balanced diet. We've enlisted dietitian Azmina Govindji to sort the shredded wheat from the chaff to help you make a healthier choice. "While it's important to make healthier choices when it comes to breakfast, it's equally just as important to make sure you eat breakfast regularly and that you enjoy it," says Govindji. What's a healthy breakfast cereal? For a healthier option, choose breakfast cereals that contain wholegrains and are lower in sugar, fat and salt. Examples include: wholewheat cereal biscuits shredded wholegrain pillows porridge oats Wholegrains contain fibre and B vitamins, among other nutrients. Fibre helps keep our digestive systems healthy. Research suggests a diet high in fibre may help reduce the risk of developing heart disease and type 2 diabetes. "Avoid always going for the same brand, as manufacturers regularly modify their recipes," says Govindji. "Try looking at the nutrition label, and compare brands so you opt for the healthier version." Mueslis, which usually contain wholegrains and fruit, are often seen as a healthier option, but check the label first – many can be relatively high in fat, added sugar and, in some cases, salt. Reading nutrition labels Food labels can help you choose between brands and avoid breakfast cereals high in suga Continue reading >>

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Cereal: It’s What’s For Breakfast… Or Lunch, Or Dinner

Raise your hand if you currently eat or have ever eaten cereal. I wouldn’t be surprised if most of you raised your hand. Back in 2005, Good Morning America conducted a poll and found that 60% of Americans eat breakfast, and of those 60%, about 40% eat either hot or cold cereal. I’m a big breakfast cereal eater, mostly because it’s fast and easy, but also because I like it. People eat cereal at any time of day, too — it’s not just for breakfast anymore. And if you’re a Seinfeld fan, you probably remember the episode when Jerry’s girlfriend ate cereal for all three meals. All sorts of studies have been done looking at how breakfast impacts various factors, including obesity, Type 2 diabetes, blood pressure, and cholesterol, as well as alertness and productivity. And starting off the day by eating cereal is a smart way to help meet your fiber and whole-grain goals (most of us fall short on these). Did you know, too, that eating a whole-grain breakfast cereal can help reduce your risk of heart failure, and is a smart way to prevent accumulating fat around your midsection (also known as the dreaded spare tire)? Decisions, Decisions So, eating breakfast is good. Eating cereal is also good with one caveat: you need to choose a cereal that’s healthy. But how? The cereal aisle in the supermarket can be overwhelming. You know you should choose something that’s high in nutrition, but the worry is that the cereal will taste like packing peanuts. Must one sacrifice flavor for health? Choosing Wisely Here are some tips that can help: Read the Nutrition Facts label. Information on the front of the box can be misleading. For example, a cereal claiming to be “low in sugar” might not be so healthful in terms of fat, whole grains, or sodium. The label and the ingredi Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Cereals And Diabetes: A Rundown Of The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Options

Cereals And Diabetes: A Rundown Of The Healthiest And Unhealthiest Options

The variety of sugar content in cereal makes it a signficant food choice for everyone with diabetes. Cereals with the lowest sugar content are naturally much better for people with diabetes, and it can be surprising just much sugar is packed in some well-known brands. Because cereals are grains, and consequently high in carbohydrates, all cereals are likely to raise your blood glucose levels. Therefore, it’s best to limit your portion sizes to no more than the recommended size, which should be listed on each cereal box. Editor’s note: If you are following a low-carb diet, you could visit the Low Carb Program for healthier breakfast ideas. To commemorate National Cereal Day over in the US, we’ve looked at some of the most popular breakfast cereals in the UK and surveyed the carbs and sugar content per 100g. To help make this information easier to digest, we’ve grouped each cereal into the healthiest and unhealthiest options. Right, on with the list. The healthiest cereals, per 100g To discover more healthy breakfast recipes, check out 12 Deliciously Tasty Low Carb Breakfasts. You can also visit the Food, Recipes and Nutrition forum. Continue reading >>

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