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What Is Similar To Lantus?

Medimpact - Drug Information Update- Basaglar (insulin Glargine) - Medconnect

Medimpact - Drug Information Update- Basaglar (insulin Glargine) - Medconnect

Drug Information Update- Basaglar (insulin glargine) New Drug Approval - Basaglar (insulin glargine) In December 2015, the FDA approved Basaglar (insulin glargine), a long-acting human insulin analog to improve glycemic control in adult and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Basaglar will compete with other long-acting insulin products, e.g. insulin glargine (Lantus, Toujeo), insulin detemir (Levemir), and insulin degludec (Tresiba). Basaglar was approved under an abbreviated approval pathway known as the 505(b)(2) pathway. The 505(b)(2) application required data demonstrating that Basaglar was sufficiently similar to Lantus in addition to data regarding the safety and efficacy of Basaglar in two clinical studies. This led to the approval of Basaglar as a follow-on biologic product. Basaglar is not considered a generic or a biosimilar to Lantus and is therefore not considered interchangeable at point of sale. Basaglar is on the drug file this week. However, the manufacturer has noted that it will not go into production and will not be commercially available in pharmacies until Thursday, December 15th, 2016. Basaglar is priced 15% AWP lower than Lantus. Basaglar shares the same GCN as Lantus but is a single source brand, not a generic or biosimilar to Lantus. Basaglar is administered subcutaneously once daily. Dosing of Basaglar should be individualized based on the patients needs. Basaglar has been launched with the following strength and dosage forms: MedImpact Formulary & Utilization Management Strategies: A full clinical review of Basaglar was conducted during the MedImpact 1st Quarter 2016 Pharmacy & Therapeutics (P&T) Committee Meeting on February 5th, 2016. During this review, the Committee approved utili Continue reading >>

Key Facts About Basaglar: A Less Expensive Long-acting Insulin

Key Facts About Basaglar: A Less Expensive Long-acting Insulin

If you’ve been using a long-acting insulin like Lantus, you might have heard about a friendly competitor called Basaglar which is coming soon to pharmacies. Basaglar is insulin glargine known as a biosimilar (also called a follow-on biologic). Because of the manufacturing process it isn’t considered a generic, but there are no differences from Lantus in regard to safety, purity and potency. To get to know Basaglar better, here are some details you’ll want to be aware of. What is the difference between a biosimilar and a generic? Generic drugs are copies of a brand name drug, and their manufacturing process can be replicated exactly through chemical reactions. Biologics are made using manufacturing processes and living organisms that are unique to each manufacturer. Therefore, it is not really possible to make an exact copy of a biologic. For an in-depth look at the definition of biosimilar, see here. Is Basaglar less expensive than Lantus? The cost of Basaglar is estimated to be about 20% cheaper than Lantus. It is manufactured by Eli Lilly as a KwikPen. Basaglar won’t be sold in a vial form. Will my insurance switch me to Basaglar? In some cases, yes. CVS Health has announced that Basaglar will be on formulary in place of Lantus. Is it really equivalent to Lantus? Yes, the onset, peak and duration of action are almost identical. Will my dose be the same as the insulin I’m currently taking? Your healthcare provider will tell you exactly how to make the switch. In general, Lantus and Basaglar can be interchanged unit for unit. If you were on Levemir, the conversion will also be unit for unit. If you were taking Levemir twice a day, the total number of units will likely be given as one Basaglar injection. If you are switching from Toujeo or NPH, your dose might Continue reading >>

Basalog Is Similar To Lantus In Producing Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus On Multiple Daily Insulin Regimens

Basalog Is Similar To Lantus In Producing Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus On Multiple Daily Insulin Regimens

, Volume 31, Issue1 , pp 2631 | Cite as Basalog is similar to Lantus in producing glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on multiple daily insulin regimens This study was performed to compare the insulin glargine produced by two different manufacturers. The study determines the efficacy and safety of a new insulin glargine (Basalog) having the same amino-acid sequence as Lantus in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on multiple daily insulin regimen. After a run-in period of 4weeks on once-daily Lantus, patients were randomized in 1:1 ratio to receive once-daily treatment with either Basalog (n = 107) or Lantus (n = 108) for 12weeks in this open-label multicenter study. Patients were enrolled from 15 hospitals in India. Change in HbA1c was the primary efficacy parameter; FPG, 7-point glucose profile and PPG were the secondary efficacy parameters. Hypoglycemia and immunogenicity were the main safety parameters. This was a non-inferiority study where non-inferiority could be claimed if mean difference (including 95% CI) was less than or equal to 0.5% for the primary efficacy parameter HbA1c. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to change in HbA1c (p = 0.69), FPG (p = 0.25) or PPG (p = 0.68). The change in HbA1c from baseline to end-point was 7.86 1.11 to 7.80 1.24% in Basalog treated patients and 7.76 1.17 to 7.58 1.27% in Lantus treated patients. Proportion of patients achieving HbA1c <7% was also comparable (40.48% in Basalog vs 38.30% in Lantus). The nature and frequency of adverse events, percentage of patients positive for anti-insulin glargine antibodies were similar in both groups. Forty-three (40.19%) subjects on Basalog experienced at least one hypoglycaemic event, while 45 (41.67%) subjects on Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Glargine (lantus, Lantus Opticlik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)?

LANTUS® (insulin glargine) Injection DESCRIPTION LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) is a sterile solution of insulin glargine for subcutaneous use. Insulin glargine is a recombinant human insulin analog that is a long-acting, parenteral blood-glucose-lowering agent [see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY]. Insulin glargine has low aqueous solubility at neutral pH. At pH 4 insulin glargine is completely soluble. After injection into the subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized, leading to formation of microprecipitates from which small amounts of insulin glargine are slowly released, resulting in a relatively constant concentration/time profile over 24 hours with no pronounced peak. This profile allows oncedaily dosing as a basal insulin. LANTUS is produced by recombinant DNA technology utilizing a non-pathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli (K12) as the production organism. Insulin glargine differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position A21 is replaced by glycine and two arginines are added to the C-terminus of the B-chain. Chemically, insulin glargine is 21A-Gly-30Ba-L-Arg-3030b-L-Arg-human insulin and has the empirical formula C267H404N72O78S6 and a molecular weight of 6063. Insulin glargine has the following structural formula: LANTUS consists of insulin glargine dissolved in a clear aqueous fluid. Each milliliter of LANTUS (insulin glargine injection) contains 100 Units (3.6378 mg) insulin glargine. The 10 mL vial presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, 20 mcg polysorbate 20, and water for injection. The 3 mL prefilled pen presentation contains the following inactive ingredients per mL: 30 mcg zinc, 2.7 mg m-cresol, 20 mg glycerol 85%, and water for inje Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Twitter Summary: 1st ever “biosimilar” insulin approved in US – potential to come cheaper than other insulins, with launch in December 2016 Lilly/BI recently announced the FDA approval of its long-awaited biosimilar insulin glargine, Basaglar, for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Basaglar is biologically similar to Sanofi’s basal insulin Lantus (insulin glargine), including the same protein sequence and a similar glucose-lowering effect. While the FDA does not call it a “biosimilar” drug for regulatory reasons, it can essentially be thought of as an alternative form of Lantus. Pricing for Basaglar is unknown at this time (more on this below), and the drug will not be launching in the US until after December 15, 2016. Why are “biosimilar” insulin options exciting? Most notably, they could potentially be offered at lower costs than brand name insulins. Basaglar has already launched in several international countries (under the brand name Abasaglar) and is typically priced at a 15%-20% discount relative to Lantus in those markets. It’s not clear yet how the discounts for Basaglar will compare in the US, and how much less patients with insurance might pay. “Generic” versions of drugs in the US typically come at a 50-80% discount to the original product. But unlike most generic drugs, biosimilar insulins are much more expensive to manufacture, so it’s unlikely they’ll see that same level of discount in the US. Indeed, Novartis launched the first “biosimilar” drug approved in the US last September (not in diabetes), which came at a 15% discount. Still, we’ve heard great optimism that biosimilar insulin glargine will help patients facing higher insulin costs. At the IDF conference in December, Dr. Matthew Riddle suggested that of all the insulins new Continue reading >>

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Type 1 diabetes patient holds up bottles of insulin.Reuters/Lucy Nicholson A new form of insulin just hit American markets. It's called Basaglar, and it is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Basaglar was approved in December 2015, but had to wait a year before launching on Thursday. A spokeswoman for Eli Lilly, the company that makes Basaglar and other insulins, told Business Insider that the list price for a pack of 5 pens is $316.85 — that's before any discounts, or factoring in what insurance might cover. It is part of a group of medications called "follow-on biologics" and together, they are expected to save the US billions of dollars over the next decade. Why there's no generic form of insulin For people living with Type 1 diabetes and some who live with Type 2, injections of insulin — a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food — are a necessary part of daily life. And insulin, in one form or another, has been around since the 1920s. But because it's made of living cells, it’s what doctors call a biologic product, and it's more complicated and difficult to manufacture than the medicines most often produced generically. That's why Basaglar isn't considered a generic, it's called a "follow-on biologic." Others taking this approach have gotten approved as biosimilars, and like Basaglar have come in at a slight discount — roughly 15% — off the list price of the original drug. To become a follow-on biologic, Basaglar had to show that its version of the drug was "sufficiently similar to Lantus to scientifically justify reliance," and the drug had to be tested Continue reading >>

In A Race For A New And Cheaper Insulin Glargine, Legal Troubles May Delay New Products From Coming To Market

In A Race For A New And Cheaper Insulin Glargine, Legal Troubles May Delay New Products From Coming To Market

Do you ever wonder why there aren’t cheaper “generic” insulin products available? This may soon change as the patents for branded insulin begin to expire. In fact, the patents for Sanofi’s top-selling Lantus (basal insulin glargine) are set to expire in the US in 2015, and other companies are racing to produce new “generic” insulins that could provide more choices for patients and importantly, push down the prices. The term “generic” traditionally applies to small molecules that are chemically and structurally equivalent to the original drug. Biosimilars created for products like insulin are biologically created products that tend to be more complex and sensitive. Thus it is difficult to completely prove that a biosimilar drug is identical to the original like a true “generic” drug. To learn more about “generic” insulin products and how they are defined, please read on in diaTribe #26. The race has already started. On December 20, Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim announced the submission of a new basal insulin glargine to the FDA. The compound, called LY2963016, is under regulatory review in the US, Europe, and Japan. In January, we learned that Sanofi has filed a lawsuit against Lilly alleging patent violations of the original top-selling Lantus (insulin glargine) – the lawsuit could delay the FDA’s decision on drug approval for up to 30 months, which would push back potential approval to 2016. This is a bit of a surprise and we’re working on “unpacking” this to better understand the moves on each side. Other companies are getting into the game as well. Merck and Samsung Bioepsis announced a partnership in February to develop a “generic” insulin glargine, and phase 3 testing of the drug candidate will begin “soon” for its can Continue reading >>

Ada: Once-daily Dosing With Lantus And Levemir Similar For Type 2 Diabetes But Different For Type 1

Ada: Once-daily Dosing With Lantus And Levemir Similar For Type 2 Diabetes But Different For Type 1

WASHINGTON, June 13 — Long-acting insulin analogs Levemir (insulin detemir) and Lantus (insulin glargine) appear equal for once-daily use in type 2 diabetes, yet Lantus may have an edge for type 1 diabetes. The two head-to-head comparisons of the metabolism activity of the long-acting insulins, presented at the American Diabetes Association meeting here, are virtually the first reports of their kind for these drugs. Both agents are FDA-approved. "We do not have any pharmacodynamic studies in type 2 diabetes for either insulin," said Tim Heise, M.D., CEO of clinical science at Profil Institute for Metabolic Research in Neuss, Germany, "and up to this conference we had no direct comparison between these two long-acting agents at all." In an oral presentation, Dr. Heise reported the results of a study that randomized 13 patients with type 2 diabetes to Levemir and 14 to receive Lantus. Both agents were given at 0.4, 0.8, and 1.4 U/kg doses to "cover the dose range" used by clinicians, with periodic 24-hour glucose monitoring under glucose clamp conditions. "There is no difference in the time-action profiles between glargine and detemir with regard to the duration of action and mean metabolic impact," he said. The groups had similar baseline characteristics with an average body mass index (BMI) of about 30 kg/m and an HbA1c of about 7.6%. The researchers included only patients with fasting C-peptide levels below 1 nmol/L to eliminate endogenous insulin production as a confounding factor. Also, all participants were male, which Dr. Heise said was to control for the differences in glucose metabolism that occur during the menstrual cycle. The researchers found that "there is really no difference" in glucose infusion rates between the Lantus and Levemir. The only differe Continue reading >>

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

Basaglar U-100 insulin glargine, which is a follow-on biologic insulin to Lantus is now available by prescription in the US. Basaglar, from Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is not technically a generic to Lantus but it does have an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus and has been FDA approved as a long-acting insulin for patients of all ages with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. David Kendall, M.D. and the vice president of Global Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes said in Lilly’s press release, “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” and that “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” Is it Cheaper? Business Insider reported that Basaglar “is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk.” An Eli Lilly spokesperson told Business Insider that before discounts or insurance coverage, the list price for a 5-pen pack of Basaglar is $316.85. You will be able to get Basaglar from retail and mail order pharmacies. Basaglar has also been chosen for the formularies of the top three pharmacy benefit managers and is expected to be covered by many commercial insurance plans. The pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health has dropped Lantus and replaced it with Basaglar for their next year’s formulary. In their announcement, CVS Health stated that th Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin And Their Roles

Types Of Insulin And Their Roles

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® Is Still Your Choice

Lantus® is a long-acting insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Lantus® should be administered once a day at the same time every day. Limitations of Use: Lantus® is not recommended for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Contraindications Lantus® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to insulin glargine or one of its excipients. Warnings and Precautions Insulin pens, needles, or syringes must never be shared between patients. Do NOT reuse needles. Monitor blood glucose in all patients treated with insulin. Modify insulin regimen cautiously and only under medical supervision. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may result in the need for a change in insulin dose or an adjustment in concomitant oral antidiabetic treatment. Do not dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. If mixed or diluted, the solution may become cloudy, and the onset of action/time to peak effect may be altered in an unpredictable manner. Do not administer Lantus® via an insulin pump or intravenously because severe hypoglycemia can occur. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse reaction of insulin therapy, including Lantus®, and may be life-threatening. Medication errors, such as accidental mix-ups between basal insulin products and other insulins, particularly rapid-acting insulins, have been reported. Patients should be instructed to always verify the insulin label before each injection. Severe life-threatening, generalized allergy, including anaphylaxis, can occur. Discontinue Lantus®, treat and monitor until symptoms resolve. A reduction in the Lantus® dose may be re Continue reading >>

Basalog (r) Is Similar To Lantus (r) In Producing Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus On Multiple Daily Insulin Regimens

Basalog (r) Is Similar To Lantus (r) In Producing Glycemic Control In Patients With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus On Multiple Daily Insulin Regimens

This study was performed to compare the insulin glargine produced by two different manufacturers. The study determines the efficacy and safety of a new insulin glargine (Basalog®) having the same amino-acid sequence as Lantus® in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus on multiple daily insulin regimen. After a run-in period of 4weeks on once-daily Lantus®, patients were randomized in 1:1 ratio to receive once-daily treatment with either Basalog® (n = 107) or Lantus® (n = 108) for 12weeks in this open-label multicenter study. Patients were enrolled from 15 hospitals in India. Change in HbA1c was the primary efficacy parameter; FPG, 7-point glucose profile and PPG were the secondary efficacy parameters. Hypoglycemia and immunogenicity were the main safety parameters. This was a non-inferiority study where non-inferiority could be claimed if mean difference (including 95% CI) was less than or equal to 0.5% for the primary efficacy parameter HbA1c. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups with respect to change in HbA1c (p = 0.69), FPG (p = 0.25) or PPG (p = 0.68). The change in HbA1c from baseline to end-point was 7.86 ± 1.11 to 7.80 ± 1.24% in Basalog® treated patients and 7.76 ± 1.17 to 7.58 ± 1.27% in Lantus® treated patients. Proportion of patients achieving HbA1c <7% was also comparable (40.48% in Basalog® vs 38.30% in Lantus®). The nature and frequency of adverse events, percentage of patients positive for anti-insulin glargine antibodies were similar in both groups. Forty-three (40.19%) subjects on Basalog® experienced at least one hypoglycaemic event, while 45 (41.67%) subjects on Lantus® experienced the same. Basalog® was found to have similar efficacy and safety as Lantus® in treatment of patients with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Easd: Additional Evidence Showed Abasaglar® (insulin Glargine) Provided Safety And Efficacy Similar To Lantus®

Easd: Additional Evidence Showed Abasaglar® (insulin Glargine) Provided Safety And Efficacy Similar To Lantus®

The subgroup of patients previously treated with Lantus had significant reductions in average blood glucose levels (HbA1c) from baseline when they were randomised to either ABASAGLAR or Lantus. Similar to the total study population, the analyses showed no significant differences in HbA1c reduction from baseline to 52 weeks in type 1 patients (-0.28 percent vs. -0.26 percent) and to 24 weeks in type 2 patients (-1.02 percent vs. -1.01 percent) with ABASAGLAR and Lantus treatment, respectively. Results also showed no significant differences between the two treatments in key secondary efficacy and safety measures, including percentage of patients reaching target HbA1c levels, total and nocturnal hypoglycaemia rates and incidence of treatment-related adverse events. Statistical differences were seen in weight change, incidence of detectable antibodies and incidence of serious adverse events; however, these differences were not observed in the total study populations. Further, these results were not consistently observed across both studies and did not indicate any clinically meaningful treatment differences. "These secondary analyses are important because they provide additional perspectives on how ABASAGLAR works in people with diabetes, regardless of prior insulin glargine treatment," said David Kendall, MD, vice president, Medical Affairs, Lilly Diabetes. "These data provide important additional evidence for the similarity of ABASAGLAR to Lantus in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and provide physicians further information on this new treatment option." ABASAGLAR® was first granted approval by the European Commission in September 2014, marking the first biosimilar insulin approval in the European Union. As of September 2015, ABASAGLAR has been commercially launche Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Cheaper Version Of Diabetes Drug Lantus

Fda Approves Cheaper Version Of Diabetes Drug Lantus

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Eli Lilly & Co's diabetes drug Basaglar, a cheaper version of Sanofi AG's top-selling drug Lantus. The drug, an injection known also as insulin glargine, is a long-acting, man-made version of human insulin. It is the first insulin product approved through a shortened review process based on its similarity to an existing drug. The FDA determined that Basaglar was sufficiently similar to Lantus to justify approval based on the safety and effectiveness of Lantus as well as certain Basaglar-specific data. In September Lilly entered a settlement agreement to resolve patent litigation with Sanofi over Basaglar, allowing Lilly and its partner, Boehringer Ingelheim, to launch Basaglar in the United States in December 2016. The FDA tentatively approved Basaglar in August 2014. Greg Kueterman, a Lilly spokesman, said the company has not set a price for the drug, though he noted it will be cheaper than Lantus. Lantus generated sales in 2014 of more than $8 billion. Rivals have been lining up to take advantage of the drug's patent expiry to launch cheaper versions. Basaglar was approved in Europe as a biosimilar last year. The FDA is calling the product a "follow-on" biologic rather than a biosimilar. There are some 30 million people with diabetes in the United States. Continue reading >>

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