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What Is Peripheral Angiopathy In Diabetes?

Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy: Disease Bioinformatics

Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy: Disease Bioinformatics

Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy: Disease Bioinformatics Research of Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy has been linked to Peripheral Vascular Diseases, Vascular Diseases, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetic Angiopathies, Ischemia. The study of Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy has been mentioned in research publications which can be found using our bioinformatics tool below. Researched pathways related to Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy include Angiogenesis, Ossification. These pathways complement our catalog of research reagents for the study of Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy including antibodies and ELISA kits against ABR, PVR, RARRES2, VEGFA. Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy Bioinformatics Tool Laverne is a handy bioinformatics tool to help facilitate scientific exploration of related genes, diseases and pathways based on co-citations. Explore more on Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy below! For more information on how to use Laverne, please read the How to Guide . Vizit , under license from BioVista Inc. We have 287 products for the study of Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy that can be applied to Western Blot, Immunocytochemistry/Immunofluorescence, Flow Cytometry, Immunohistochemistry from our catalog of antibodies and ELISA kits. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Angiopathy And Angiogenic Defects

Diabetic Angiopathy And Angiogenic Defects

Diabetic angiopathy and angiogenic defects 1Division of Diabetology & Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Uchinada, Ishikawa, 920-0293, Japan 2Division of Diabetology & Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan Province, 646000, Peoples Republic of China 1Division of Diabetology & Endocrinology, Kanazawa Medical University, Uchinada, Ishikawa, 920-0293, Japan 2Division of Diabetology & Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou, Sichuan Province, 646000, Peoples Republic of China Received 2012 May 6; Accepted 2012 Jul 12. Copyright 2012 Xu et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Diabetes is one of the most serious health problems in the world. A major complication of diabetes is blood vessel disease, termed angiopathy, which is characterized by abnormal angiogenesis. In this review, we focus on angiogenesis abnormalities in diabetic complications and discuss its benefits and drawbacks as a therapeutic target for diabetic vascular complications. Additionally, we discuss glucose metabolism defects that are associated with abnormal angiogenesis in atypical diabetic complications such as cancer. Keywords: Diabetes, Complication, Angiogenesis, VEGF The epidemic of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes has prompted the need for strategies to prevent and treat diabetic complications [ 1 ]. In diabetes, diverse sets of organs are damaged. Such organ damage is certainly fundamentally associated with glucose metabolism defects. Continue reading >>

Endothelial Dysfunction And Pathogenesis Of Diabetic Angiopathy

Endothelial Dysfunction And Pathogenesis Of Diabetic Angiopathy

Endothelial dysfunction and pathogenesis of diabetic angiopathy aDepartment of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands bInstitute for Cardiovascular Research, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands Corresponding author. Tel. +31 20 4440531; Fax +31 20 4440502. Search for other works by this author on: aDepartment of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands bInstitute for Cardiovascular Research, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands Search for other works by this author on: aDepartment of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands bInstitute for Cardiovascular Research, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands Search for other works by this author on: cGaubius Laboratory, TNO Prevention and Health, 2301 CE Leiden, Netherlands Search for other works by this author on: Cardiovascular Research, Volume 34, Issue 1, 1 April 1997, Pages 5568, Coen D.A Stehouwer, Jan Lambert, A.J.M Donker, Victor W.M van Hinsbergh; Endothelial dysfunction and pathogenesis of diabetic angiopathy, Cardiovascular Research, Volume 34, Issue 1, 1 April 1997, Pages 5568, Objective and Methods: To review, from the clinical perspective, the contribution of dysfunction of the vascular endothelium to the pathogenesis of diabetic micro- and macroangiopathy. Results: Available data indicate that endothelial dysfunction in diabetes complicated by micro- or macroalbuminuria (renal microangiopathy) is generalised. The close linkage between microalbuminuria and endothelial dysfunction is an attractive explanation for the fact that microalbumi Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes W Diabetic Peripheral Angiopath W/o Gangrene

Type 2 Diabetes W Diabetic Peripheral Angiopath W/o Gangrene

Diabetes Complications Also called: Diabetic complications If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can cause problems with other body functions, such as your kidneys, nerves, feet, and eyes. Having diabetes can also put you at a higher risk for heart disease and bone and joint disorders. Other long-term complications of diabetes include skin problems, digestive problems, sexual dysfunction, and problems with your teeth and gums. Very high or very low blood sugar levels can also lead to emergencies in people with diabetes. The cause can be an underlying infection, certain medicines, or even the medicines you take to control your diabetes. If you feel nauseated, sluggish or shaky, seek emergency care. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Diabetes - preventing heart attack and stroke (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetes: Dental Tips - NIH (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research) Diabetic hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (Medical Encyclopedia) Diabetic ketoacidosis (Medical Encyclopedia) Long term complications of diabetes (Medical Encyclopedia) [Read More] Diabetes Type 2 Also called: Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, obese, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Angiopathy - Wikipedia

Diabetic Angiopathy - Wikipedia

Diabetic angiopathy is a form of angiopathy associated with diabetic complications [1] . While not exclusive, the two most common forms are Diabetic retinopathy and Diabetic nephropathy , whose pathophysiologies are largely identical. Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of adult kidney failure worldwide. It also the most common cause of amputation in the US, usually toes and feet, often as a result of gangrene , and almost always as a result of peripheral vascular disease. Retinal damage (from microangiopathy ) makes it the most common cause of blindness among non-elderly adults in the US. As insulin is required for glucose uptake, hyperglycemia in diabetes mellitus does not result in a net increase in intracellular glucose in most cells. However, chronic dysregulated blood glucose in diabetes is toxic to cells of the vascular endothelium which passively assimilate glucose. That is, cells in which insulin is not required for intercellular transport of glucose, most-notably the pericytes of the microvasculature . In addition to direct glucose-induced damage by (e.g.) glycation , pericytes express enzymes which convert glucose into osmologically-active metabolites such as sorbitol leading to hypertonic cell lysis. Over time, pericyte death may result in reduced capillary integrity; subsequently, there is leaking of albumin and other proteins into fluid compartments. The glomeruli of the kidneys are especially sensitive see diabetic nephropathy where protein leakage caused by late-stage angiopathy results in diagnostic proteinuria and eventually renal failure . In diabetic retinopathy the end-result is often blindness due to irreversible retinal damage. Continue reading >>

Peripheral Vascular Disease And Type 2 Diabetes: What's The Connection?

Peripheral Vascular Disease And Type 2 Diabetes: What's The Connection?

When blood glucose (sugar) levels are too high for too long, or swing back and forth between highs and lows, people with diabetes put themselves at risk for serious complications and damage to their bodies. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is one of the medical complications that can strike when type 2 diabetes is not well managed. Peripheral vascular disease includes several conditions that affect the blood vessels. PVD occurs when peripheral blood vessels, those located away from the heart, become blocked or damaged in some way. Peripheral artery disease, or PAD, is one type of PVD; it affects arteries in the arms and legs. PVD Symptoms The main symptoms of peripheral vascular disease include: Pain in the buttocks or extremities, including the thighs or calves A blue tint to the toes Numbness in the legs or feet A heavy feeling in the limbs Cold feet Leg cramps, which often increase with more activity Skin redness Frequent infections Foot pain Wounds on the feet and toes that won't heal PVD Causes PVD occurs when plaque, which is composed of cholesterol and other fatty substances found in the blood, builds up and creates a blockage in the blood vessels, keeping blood from flowing properly. Peripheral vascular disease can be caused or worsened by: Smoking Having high blood pressure Having persistent high blood glucose levels African-Americans are at a significantly increased risk of developing PVD; people age 50 and older and people with diabetes are also at an increased risk for the condition. PVD Prevention and Treatment People with diabetes can do much to protect themselves against PVD and keep their blood vessels clear. Start by achieving good control over your diabetes with these steps: Take all diabetes medications as prescribed by your doctor. Keep blood pressu Continue reading >>

Angiopathy - Wikipedia

Angiopathy - Wikipedia

Angiopathy is the generic term for a disease of the blood vessels ( arteries , veins , and capillaries ). [1] The best known and most prevalent angiopathy is diabetic angiopathy , a common complication of chronic diabetes . There are two types of angiopathy: macroangiopathy and microangiopathy . In macroangiopathy, atherosclerosis and a resultant blood clot forms on the large blood vessels, sticks to the vessel walls, and blocks the flow of blood . Macroangiopathy may cause other complications, such as ischemic heart disease , stroke and peripheral vascular disease which contributes to the diabetic foot ulcers and the risk of amputation. In microangiopathy, the walls of the smaller blood vessels become so thick and weak that they bleed , leak protein , and slow the flow of blood through the body. The decrease of blood flow through stenosis or clot formation impairs the flow of oxygen to cells and biological tissues (called ischemia ) and leads to cellular death ( necrosis and gangrene , which in turn may require amputation ). Thus, tissues which are very sensitive to oxygen levels, such as the retina , develop microangiopathy and may cause blindness (so-called proliferative diabetic retinopathy ). Damage to nerve cells may cause peripheral neuropathy , and to kidney cells, diabetic nephropathy ( Kimmelstiel-Wilson syndrome ). Continue reading >>

Diabetic Angiopathy: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment | Competently About Health On Ilive

Diabetic Angiopathy: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment | Competently About Health On Ilive

The first signs of vascular disease are manifested in lowering the temperature of the lower extremities, a weak pulse or a complete absence of arterial pulse on the legs, the skin is dry, cyanotic in color, in places redness may occur, the hair on the affected part of the skin falls out, and ischemic swelling is noticeable. Diabetic angiopathy is a lesion of small vessels of the lower extremities in diabetes mellitus. The causes of the development of this disease lie in the metabolic disorders caused by changes in blood vessels in diabetes . The causes of diabetic angiopathy also depend on the following factors: Disruption of the exchange of mucoproteins and lipids, which affects the state of the vascular system. The degree and severity of the course of diabetes mellitus, the duration of the disease. In secondary diabetes, which is preceded by a pancreatic injury, partial amputation or pancreatitis, the incidence of diabetic angiopathy increases many-fold. Also, changes in blood vessels are recorded in laboratory studies based on the introduction of the contrusulant hormone or physical effects on the islets of the pancreas. Also, there is a high likelihood of a hereditary transmission of the disease, four possible options. In addition, the category of risk includes those people who, in addition to hereditary endocrine pathology, have metabolic disorders. The causes of diabetic angiopathy, as a rule, speak of a dangerous predisposition to this disease. Therefore, it is important to systematically undergo examinations to prevent the development of the disease and severe consequences. By the nature of the lesions of the vessels distinguish between microangiopathy (changes in capillaries) and macroangiopathy (damage to the arterial and venous system). Symptoms of diabetic Continue reading >>

Peripheral Arterial Disease (pad)

Peripheral Arterial Disease (pad)

Peripheral arterial disease, also called PAD, occurs when blood vessels in the legs are narrowed or blocked by fatty deposits and blood flow to your feet and legs decreases. If you have PAD, you have an increased risk for heart attack and stroke. An estimated 1 out of every 3 people with diabetes over the age of 50 have this condition. However, many of those with warning signs don't realize that they have PAD and therefore don't get treatment. If you have diabetes, you're much more likely to have PAD, a heart attack, or a stroke. But you can cut your chances of having those problems by taking special care of your blood vessels. How Do I Know Whether I'm at High Risk for PAD? Just having diabetes puts you at risk, but your risk is even greater under the following conditions: History of heart disease, or you've have had a heart attack or a stroke Family history of heart disease, heart attacks, or strokes You can't change your age or your family history, but taking care of your diabetes and the conditions that come with it can lower your chances of having PAD. Many people with diabetes and PAD do not have any symptoms. Some people may experience mild leg pain or trouble walking and believe that it's just a sign of getting older. Others may have the following symptoms: Leg pain, particularly when walking or exercising, which disappears after a few minutes of rest Numbness, tingling, or coldness in the lower legs or feet Sores or infections on your feet or legs that heal slowly The ankle brachial index (ABI) is one test used to diagnose PAD. This test compares the blood pressure in your ankle to the blood pressure in your arm. If the blood pressure in the lower part of your leg is lower than the pressure in your arm, you may have PAD. An expert panel brought together by the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy

Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy

Diabetes with peripheral circulatory disorder; Diabetic peripheral vascular disease; Peripheral angiopathy due to diabetes mellitus Diabetic peripheral vascular disease(127014009); Diabetic peripheral angiopathy(127014009); Diabetes with peripheral circulatory disorder(127014009); Peripheral angiopathy due to diabetes mellitus(127014009) Huang K,Ma Y,Wang J,Shi S,Fu L,Liu J,Li L,Lu H,Liang X,Liu Y,Jiang H J Diabetes Complications2017 May;31(5):886-890.Epub 2017 Feb 14doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.02.006.PMID: 28242269 Kallio M,Vikatmaa P,Kantonen I,Lepntalo M,Venermo M,Tukiainen E Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg2015 Aug;50(2):223-30.Epub 2015 May 19doi: 10.1016/j.ejvs.2015.04.004.PMID: 26001322 Aubert CE,Cluzel P,Kemel S,Michel PL,Lajat-Kiss F,Dadon M,Hartemann A,Bourron O Diabet Med2014 Feb;31(2):192-9.Epub 2013 Sep 11doi: 10.1111/dme.12309.PMID: 23952656 Suzuki E,Yoshimura T,Omura Y,Sakaguchi M,Nishio Y,Maegawa H,Hisatomi A,Fujimoto K,Takeda J,Kashiwagi A Diabetes Metab Res Rev2009 May;25(4):363-9.doi: 10.1002/dmrr.955.PMID: 19334018 Huang K,Ma Y,Wang J,Shi S,Fu L,Liu J,Li L,Lu H,Liang X,Liu Y,Jiang H J Diabetes Complications2017 May;31(5):886-890.Epub 2017 Feb 14doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2017.02.006.PMID: 28242269 Hernndez D,Castro de la Nuez P,Muriel A,Ruiz-Esteban P,Rudas E,Gonzlez-Molina M,Burgos D,Cabello M,Palma E,Gutirrez E,Alonso M Transplantation2017 Jun;101(6):1320-1326.doi: 10.1097/TP.0000000000001294.PMID: 27379552 Kallio M,Vikatmaa P,Kantonen I,Lepntalo M,Venermo M,Tukiainen E Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg2015 Aug;50(2):223-30.Epub 2015 May 19doi: 10.1016/j.ejvs.2015.04.004.PMID: 26001322 Aubert CE,Cluzel P,Kemel S,Michel PL,Lajat-Kiss F,Dadon M,Hartemann A,Bourron O Diabet Med2014 Feb;31(2):192-9.Epub 2013 Sep 11doi: 10.1111/dme.12309.PMID: 23952656 Huang K,Ma Y,Wang Continue reading >>

Coding For Peripheral Artery Disease

Coding For Peripheral Artery Disease

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a circulatory condition resulting in reduced blood flow to the extremities, typically the legs. The most common symptom is intermittent claudication (pain when walking), which resolves after a few minutes of rest. The location of the pain depends on the site of the narrowed or clogged artery. PAD may also be documented as peripheral vascular disease (PVD). PAD, PVD, and intermittent claudication not otherwise specified are classified to ICD-9-CM code 443.9, which also includes peripheral angiopathy not otherwise specified and spasm of artery. If the PAD is due to diabetes mellitus, codes 250.7 and 443.81 are assigned, sequencing the diabetic code (250.7) first. Code 250.7 requires a fifth-digit subclassification to identify whether the diabetes is type 1 or type 2 and controlled or uncontrolled. Another condition potentially related to PAD is atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis of the extremities is classified to code 440.2. A fifth-digit subclassification is required to differentiate the type of atherosclerosis as follows: 440.20, Atherosclerosis of the extremities, unspecified; 440.21, Atherosclerosis of the extremities with intermittent claudication; 440.22, Atherosclerosis of the extremities with rest pain; 440.23, Atherosclerosis of the extremities with ulceration; 440.24, Atherosclerosis of the extremities with gangrene; and Codes from subcategory 440.2x are considered a hierarchy. So if patient has atherosclerotic PAD (ASPAD) with gangrene, it is assumed the patient also has an ulcer. Do not assign codes 440.23 and 440.24 on the same record. If the patient has an ulcer with the atherosclerosis, according to coding directives, it is appropriate to assign a code for any associated ulceration (707.10 to 707.9) in addition to the 440. Continue reading >>

Angiopathy In Diabetes Mellitus

Angiopathy In Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetic angiopathy is a kind of complication, which is common among people that suffer from diabetes mellitus. In the course of the disease sides of blood vessels and capillary tubes in particular are decaying and the blood stasis is suffering very much. Diabetic angiopathy is divided into two types of the diseases: micro- and macro-angiopathy. In case of macro-angiopathy, the heart vessels and lower body limbs are affected. While in case with micro-angiopathy most damage is applied to eyes and kidneys. It is known that diabetes mellitus causes hormonal and metabolitic disorders, which are the triggers for development and appearance of diabetic angiopathy. However not all diabetics complain on the angiopathy appearance. This disease appearance depends not only on the hormonal phone of a particular patient, but also on the genetic features of that particular person. Scientists are not unanimous in defining the factors that promote development of diabetic angiopathy, but it is already known that patients of group I and group II are affected in different ways. It is known that people with higher arterial pressure, smokers, drunkards and those who work in harmful environment are prone to appearance of diabetic angiopathy most of all. Diabetic micro-angiopathy is developed through five stages. In the course of this disease, kidneys begin to lower all their activities, also hard arterial hypertension appears and proteinuria appears too (high molecular weight proteins are present in urine). It is highly difficult to distinguish this disease, and generally, to make sure the disease is in progress, it is necessary to conduct needle biopsy of kidneys. Hypertonic angiopathy belongs to micro-angiopathy. Signs of this disease are: varicose veins on the eye fundus, non-uniform arte Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

What Is Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

What is Diabetic Peripheral Angiopathy: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment Diabetic peripheral angiopathy (DPA) is a blood vessel disease caused by high blood sugar levels (glucose). It is one of the most common complications of diabetes. It affects blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood away from the heart. These vessels supply blood to many different parts of the body. However, DPA often affects blood vessels in the legs and feet. Diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin. It can also occur if cells do not respond well to insulin. Diabetes prevents glucose (the bodys main source of energy) from reaching the cells. Thus, glucose builds up in the blood. DPA has two main types, namely macroangiopathy and microangiopathy. The former causes blood clots to form in large blood vessels and cause a blockage. This prevents blood from reaching vital organs, such as the heart and the brain. Thus, it increases the risk of heart attack and stroke . Microangiopathy, on the other hand, affects the smaller blood vessels. The condition makes them thick and weak. As a result, the flow of blood throughout the body is slowed down. This increases the risk of diabetic retinopathy (which can lead to blindness) and kidney disease. Diabetic peripheral angiopathy occurs due to uncontrolled diabetes. Diabetes increases the risk of atherosclerosis . This refers to the build-up of plaque in the arteries. Plaque is made up of substances found in blood, such as calcium and cholesterol. Too much plaque in the arteries can limit the amount of blood that flows through the affected blood vessel. It can also completely obstruct or cut off blood supply to other body parts. Without enough blood supply, tissues on the affected body parts will not su Continue reading >>

Health Data Standards And Systems

Health Data Standards And Systems

Thankyou for your advice on coding the following basic concepts of diabetes that we seem to keep revisiting especially since being recently audited and acquiring new staff: Can diabetes be coded as an associated condition based on one BSL alone? We had discussed and agreed that using monitoring as a basis for meeting additional diagnosis, more than one BSL would be required according to definition and one level is just a baseline observation always done on admission as part of the nursing admission process (along with urinalysis, resps, pulse, BP,filling out paperwork, medications etc). If it can be coded based on one BSL alone how does this meet additional diagnosis? E1x.23 Diabetes Mellitus with end-stage renal disease (as the clinical diagnosis is fully described by the code description) E1x.23 Diabetes Mellitus with end-stage renal disease How do you code diabetes with PVD (without claudication, rest pain, ulcer or gangrene)? E1x.51 Diabetes Mellitus with peripheral angiopathy, without gangrene E1x.51 Diabetes Mellitus with peripheral angiopathy, without gangrene I70.20 Atherosclerosis of arteries of extremities, unspecified How do you code diabetes with PVD with (non-foot) lower limb ulcer? E1x.51 Diabetes Mellitus with peripheral angiopathy, without gangrene I70.23 Atherosclerosis of arteries of extremities with ulceration E1x.69 Diabetes Mellitus with other specified complication L97 Ulcer of lower limb, not elsewhere classified E1x.51 Diabetes Mellitus with peripheral angiopathy, without gangrene E1x.69 Diabetes Mellitus with other specified complication L97 Ulcer of lower limb, not elsewhere classified E1x.51 Diabetes Mellitus with peripheral angiopathy, without gangrene I70.20 Atherosclerosis of arteries of extremities, unspecified Dorlands dictionary defines Continue reading >>

Diabetic Angiopathy: Prevention And Care Of Diabetic Foot Ulcers - Includes Patient Information Sheet At The Medical Dictionary

Diabetic Angiopathy: Prevention And Care Of Diabetic Foot Ulcers - Includes Patient Information Sheet At The Medical Dictionary

There are two types of angiopathy: macroangiopathy and microangiopathy. In macroangiopathy, fat and blood clots build up in the large blood vessels, stick to the vessel walls, and block the flow of blood. In microangiopathy, the walls of the smaller blood vessels become so thick and weak that they bleed, leak protein, and slow the flow of blood through the body. The decrease of blood flow through stenosis or clot formation impair the flow of oxygen to cells and biological tissues (called ischemia) and lead to their death (necrosis and gangrene, which in turn may require amputation). Thus, tissues which are very sensitive to oxygen levels, such as the retina, develop microangiopathy and may cause blindness (so-called proliferative diabetic retinopathy). Damage to nerve cells may cause peripheral neuropathy, and to kidney cells, diabetic nephropathy (Kimmelstiel-Wilson syndrome). Macroangiopathy, on the other hand, may cause other complications, such as ischemic heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease which contributes to the diabetic foot ulcers and the risk of amputation. Diabetes mellitus is the most common cause of adult kidney failure worldwide. It also the most common cause of amputation in the US, usually toes and feet, often as a result of gangrene, and almost always as a result of peripheral vascular disease. Retinal damage (from microangiopathy) makes it the most common cause of blindness among non-elderly adults in the US. "Diabetic dermopathy" is a manifestation of diabetic angiopathy. It is often found on the shin. Treatment Protocol for Diabetic Foot Ulcers 1. Control local and systemic sequelae of infection, including hyperglycemia. 2. Promptly drain all closed-space infections and debride all necrotic material from bleeding margins. 3. Promo Continue reading >>

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