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What Is National Diabetes Day?

World Diabetes Day – November 14

World Diabetes Day – November 14

World Diabetes Day — celebrated every year on November 14 — was created in 1991 by the International Diabetes Foundation. Diabetes is a chronic disease where the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin. It can also lead to other chronic conditions like kidney failure and heart attacks, hence the push to draw attention to an illness with increasing numbers worldwide. Curious as to why we celebrate this important day on November 14 specifically? This datewas picked because it’s the birthday of Frederick Banting, who discovered insulin in 1922. So read on, and help us raise awareness of this important condition. Why World Diabetes Day is Important A. It draws attention to the diabetes epidemic Over a 25 year span (from 1988 to 2013) diabetes diagnoses increased roughly 380%. And these diagnoses are dangerous—by the year 2030 the World Health Organization predicts diabetes will be the seventh leading cause of death in the world. This condition demands attention—and that’s why having a whole day dedicated to it is crucial. B. Type II diabetes can be avoided World Diabetes Day serves as a reminder to live our lives more healthfully. Type II diabetes can be limited through a healthy diet, regular physical activity and maintaining a normal weight. Tobacco use exacerbates type II diabetes as well, and is best avoided. C. It’s a reminder to be educated about diabetes Type II diabetes has grown to epidemic proportions, but type I diabetes, formerly known as juvenile diabetes, is just as serious a health threat. Approximately 1.25 million Americans are diagnosed with type I diabetes, but the cause of the disease is unknown. However, the health effects are just as devastating as type II diabetes. World Diabetes Day serves as a reminder to know the symptoms of diabete Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

Logo for World Diabetes Day World Diabetes Day is the primary global awareness campaign focusing on diabetes mellitus and is held on November 14 each year. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), each World Diabetes Day focuses on a theme related to diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes is largely preventable and treatable non-communicable disease that is rapidly increasing in numbers worldwide. Type 1 Diabetes is not preventable but can be managed with insulin injections. [1] Topics covered have included diabetes and human rights, diabetes and lifestyle, diabetes and obesity, diabetes in the disadvantaged and the vulnerable, and diabetes in children and adolescents. While the campaigns last the whole year, the day itself marks the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best and John James Rickard Macleod, first conceived the idea which led to the discovery of insulin in 1922.[2] History[edit] World Diabetes Day was launched in 1991 by the IDF and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to the rapid rise of diabetes around the world.[1][3] By 2016, World Diabetes Day was being commemorated by over 230 IDF member associations in more than 160 countries and territories, as well as by other organizations, companies, healthcare professionals, politicians, celebrities, and people living with diabetes and their families.[4] Activities include diabetes screening programmes, radio and television campaigns, sports events and others. Themes[edit] Themes of previous World Diabetes Day campaigns have focused on different factors that influence the risk of diabetes and its complications:[5] 2013: Protect our Future: Diabetes Education and Prevention. 2014: Go Blue for Breakfast. 2015: Healthy Eating. 2016: Eyes on Diabetes. 2017: Women and diabetes – our rig Continue reading >>

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

November Is National Diabetes Awareness Month

The JDRF community will be raising awareness about type 1 diabetes (T1D) throughout the month of November. We’ll kick things off on T1Day, November 1, 2017, by telling our stories to the world. Every minute of every day, people with T1D persevere in the face of adversity. JDRF is committed to making day-to-day life with the disease easier, safer and healthier while working toward ways to cure and prevent T1D once and for all. This November, we are continuing our T1D Looks Like Me campaign to spread awareness about life with T1D. Visit our website or follow us on social media to “Get Quizzed by a Whiz Kid” and test your knowledge against that of a nine-year-old with T1D. You can also create a custom “T1D Looks Like Me” profile photo for social media or generate your unique “T1D Footprint.” You can post your footprint image to Facebook, Instagram or Twitter to shed light on the cumulative burden of finger pricks, injections and other disruptions that come with living with T1D. JDRF will also continue our important advocacy efforts throughout the month. We are asking Congress to continue funding critical research through the Special Diabetes Program and pressuring insurers to guarantee that everyone has the Coverage 2 Control their T1D. Check back with us on World Diabetes Day, November 14, 2017, and throughout the month for more blogs, stories and ways to share what it means to be affected by T1D. Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

10 Ways To Raise Diabetes Awareness This November (and Why It Matters)

The biggest month for diabetes awareness activities is only a few days away, and it’s the perfect time to raise your voice to increase awareness about diabetes! You might ask: Why? How does more awareness meaningfully impact the lives of people with diabetes? The question is a good one, but the answer is simple. Awareness is the first step to any kind of change. More funding for research, better public support for legislation issues. More understanding and empathy. Less blame and shame. Awareness + education is even more powerful. Knowing symptoms of type 1 can be life-saving when a diagnosis is right around the corner. If you’re at risk for type 2, education can help prevent or delay the progression of the disease (in cases where you’re able to do that). And education that helps our communities offer support (instead of blame) through a very challenging disease is invaluable. Here’s a list of different ways you and your family and friends can make an impact for diabetes in your community. 1. Make Social Noise with JDRF’s Thunderclap Campaign Once again JDRF kicks off National Diabetes Awareness Month on November 1st with type 1 diabetes awareness day, “T1D”, a day devoted to raising the voices of people touched by type 1 diabetes. Use the web platform “Thunderclap” to join in an auto-generated, mass-shared social media post All you have to do is sign-up on the JDRF #noT1D Thunderclap page. Show your friends, family, and the public you can live well with this disease and chase your dreams – whether that’s running marathons, travelling the world, falling in love, or advocating for a cause. The Instagram contest will ask you to show a photo of how you’re doing just that along with a few sentences on what it’s like to live with diabetes. Look for Continue reading >>

National Diabetes Month 2017

National Diabetes Month 2017

Each November communities across the country observe National Diabetes Month to bring attention to diabetes and its impact on millions of Americans. Living with diabetes can be challenging to manage every day. You are the most important member of your diabetes care team, but you don’t have to manage your diabetes alone. Seek support from health care professionals, your family, friends, and community to manage your diabetes. Watch the video below, and when you’re ready learn more about managing your diabetes. Help Promote National Diabetes Month! We encourage partners, organizations, and health care professionals to use our resources and share our 2017 theme in their communities. Continue reading >>

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

It's Your Life. Treat Your Diabetes Well.

November is National Diabetes Month. Here’s to managing your diabetes for a longer, healthier life. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but a healthy lifestyle can really reduce its impact on your life. What you do every day makes the difference: eating a healthy diet, being physically active, taking medicines if prescribed, and keeping health care appointments to stay on track. The Basics More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant, which can put the pregnancy and baby at risk and lead to type 2 diabetes later). With type 1 diabetes, your body can’t make insulin (a hormone that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy), so you need to take it every day. Type 1 diabetes is less common than type 2 diabetes; about 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Currently, no one knows how to prevent type 1 diabetes. Most people with diabetes—9 out of 10—have type 2 diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well and is unable to keep blood sugar at normal levels. If you have any of the risk factors below, ask your doctor if you should be tested for diabetes. The sooner you find out, the sooner you can start making healthy changes that will benefit you now and in the future. More than 30 million US adults have diabetes—and 1 out of 4 of them don’t know they have it. At least 1 out of 3 people will develop diabetes in their lifetime. Medical costs for people with diabetes are twice as high as for people without diabetes. Risk of death for adults with diabetes is 50% higher than for adults without diabetes. Type 2 diabetes risk factors include: Continue reading >>

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

November: World Diabetes Day And Diabetes Awareness Month!

With November being National Diabetes Awareness Month in the U.S., you can imagine there’s a slew of awareness campaigns and fundraising events that go on throughout the month. This effort has taken on more international importance in recent years, with the growth of global observances of World Diabetes Day that takes place annually on November 14, the date marking the birthday of insulin co-discoverer Dr. Frederick Banting. Here at DiabetesMine, we’ve covered these November diabetes activities at length over the years. Please browse through this overview of posts we’ve written to get a sense of what happens when diabetes awareness becomes a national and international priority. Diabetes Awareness Month 2017 This year, we believe the need for diabetes awareness month is more important than ever. Many different diabetes organizations have a plethora of activities and initiatives, including the American Diabetes Association and JDRF that are both emphasizing the "invisible illness" aspect of living with diabetes. Our roundup explores all of the happenings within the USA and across the world. Diabetes Months of the Past Don’t miss our coverage of what happened for Diabetes Awareness Month last year, in both the U.S. and across the globe. You’ll read about efforts from the American Diabetes Association (ADA), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), JDRF, Diabetes Hands Foundation, and other groups working to raise public awareness and make a difference for the Diabetes Community. You can also reflect back on the prior year, with our coverage of Diabetes Awareness Month 2015, when both the ADA and IDF focused on the theme of educating people about healthy eating. World Diabetes Day and the Blue Circle World Diabetes Day (WDD) was established by the International Di Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day is the primary global awareness campaign of the diabetes world and is held on November 14 each year. Each year, World Diabetes Day is centered on a theme related to diabetes. Topics covered have included diabetes and human rights, diabetes and lifestyle, diabetes and obesity, diabetes in the disadvantaged and the vulnerable, diabetes in children and adolescents. People with diabetes get to take a day off work or school on this day[1] and talking about Diabetes.[2] World Diabetes Day is celebrated worldwide by the over 230 member associations of the International Diabetes Federation in more than 160 countries and territories, all Member States of the United Nations, as well as by other associations and organizations, companies, healthcare professionals and people living with diabetes and their families. OBSERVE The global diabetes community including International Diabetes Federation member associations, diabetes organizations, NGOs, health departments, civil society, individuals and companies develop an extensive range of activities, tailored to a variety of groups. Activities organized each year include: Radio and television programs Sports events Free screenings for diabetes and its complications Public information meetings Poster and leaflet campaigns Diabetes workshops and exhibitions Press conferences Newspaper and magazine articles Events for children and adolescents Monument lightings Human blue circles Walks Runs Cycle Race Political Events Use #WorldDiabetesDay to share on social media. HISTORY World Diabetes Day was introduced in 1991 by the International Diabetes Federation and the World Health Organization in response to the alarming rise of diabetes around the world. World Diabetes Day is a campaign that features a new theme chosen by the Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

Around the globe on November 14, World Diabetes Day raises awareness and provides education concerning a disease that affects over 400 million adults internationally. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), by 2040 approximately 642 million adults will have diabetes. With diabetes causing 5 million deaths in 2015, this projection is a source of concern. Awareness, education, action and research all can make a difference. HOW TO OBSERVE Visit www.worlddiabetes.org to learn more about both type 1 & 2 diabetes. Find out how to get screened, to prevent type 2 diabetes and more about treatment. Use #WorldDiabetesDay to share on social media. HISTORY The International Diabetes Federation & the World Health Organization created World Diabetes Day in 1991 to raise awareness of the rising threat of diabetes around the world. In 2006, the day became one of the official United Nations Days. There are over 1,200 national days. Don’t miss a single one. Celebrate Every Day with National Day Calendar! Continue reading >>

7 Facts About World Diabetes Day

7 Facts About World Diabetes Day

WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some facts to raise awareness, courtesy of the International Diabetes Federation. Like WTOP on Facebook and follow @WTOP on Twitter to engage in conversation about this article and others. © 2017 WTOP. All Rights Reserved. WASHINGTON — World Diabetes Day is Tuesday, Nov. 14. Here are some fac Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day is the world’s largest diabetes awareness campaign reaching a global audience of over 1 billion people in more than 160 countries. The campaign draws attention to issues of paramount importance to the diabetes world and keeps diabetes firmly in the public and political spotlight. World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2006 with the passage of United Nation Resolution 61/225. The World Diabetes Day campaign aims to: Be the platform to promote IDF advocacy efforts throughout the year. Be the global driver to promote the importance of taking coordinated and concerted actions to confront diabetes as a critical global health issue. The campaign is represented by a blue circle logo that was adopted in 2007 after the passage of the UN Resolution on diabetes. The blue circle is the global symbol for diabetes awareness. It signifies the unity of the global diabetes community in response to the diabetes epidemic. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

Tweet every year. It has grown from humble beginnings to become a globally-celebrated event which increases awareness about diabetes. Comprising hundreds of campaigns, activities, screenings, lecture, meetings and more, World Diabetes Day is proving internationally effective in spreading the message about diabetes and raising awareness for the condition. World Diabetes Day is internationally recognised and is an official United Nations Day. World Diabetes Day Each year, World Diabetes Day, which is co-ordinated by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), carries a particular theme. Between 2014-2016 it was healthy living and eating, and between 2009-2013 it was ‘education and prevention’. To learn more about World Diabetes Day, visit worlddiabetesday.org Countdown to World Diabetes Day 2017: World Diabetes Day 2017 The theme for World Diabetes Day 2017 is ‘Women and diabetes - our right to a healthy future.’ It is reported than one in 10 women live with diabetes, but not all women have the same access to education, treatment and care. This year’s campaign is designed to improve the affordability and accessibility for diabetes care worldwide to help women with diabetes better manage their diabetes and improve their health outcomes. Who introduced World Diabetes Day? World Diabetes Day was jointly introduced by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). The global diabetes awareness campaign was introduced amidst concern over an escalating diabetes epidemic. Why is November 14th World Diabetes Day? November 14th is a significant date in the diabetes calendar because it marks the birthday of the man who co-discovered insulin, Frederick Banting. Banting discovered insulin in 1922, alongside Charles Best. World Diabetes Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

World Diabetes Day And The History Of The Blue Circle

We all know November is Diabetes awareness month, and November 14th is “World Diabetes Day.” But what is the meaning of the “blue circle” and why do we celebrate and advocate for diabetes so much this month? I asked Keegan Hall, the President of the Young Leaders in Diabetes Program, to talk a bit about the history. Many causes and conditions have a colored ribbon to symbolize the cause. In the diabetes community, we have done something very different—a blue circle. The blue circle is the universal symbol for diabetes. Until 2006, there was no global symbol for diabetes. The purpose of the symbol is to give diabetes a common identity. It aims to: Support all existing efforts to raise awareness about diabetes Inspire new activities, bring diabetes to the attention of the general public Brand diabetes Provide a means to show support for the fight against diabetes What is the history of the blue circle? The icon was originally developed for the campaign that resulted in the passage of United Nations Resolution 61/225 “World Diabetes Day.” The campaign for a United Nations Resolution on diabetes was a response to the diabetes pandemic that is set to overwhelm healthcare resources everywhere. The campaign mobilized diabetes stakeholders behind the common cause of securing a United Nations Resolution on diabetes. The United Nations passed Resolution 61/225 ‘World Diabetes Day’ on December 20, 2006. Why a circle? The circle occurs frequently in nature and has thus been widely employed since the dawn of humankind. The significance is overwhelmingly positive. Across cultures, the circle can symbolize life and health. Most significantly for the campaign, the circle symbolizes unity. Our combined strength is the key element that made this campaign so special. The Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day (WDD) is celebrated annually on November 14. Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), World Diabetes Day was created in 1991 by IDF and the World Health Organization in response to growing concerns about the escalating health threat posed by diabetes. World Diabetes Day became an official United Nations Day in 2006 with the passage of United Nation Resolution 61/225. Continue reading >>

World Diabetes Day

World Diabetes Day

On November 14 each year, World Diabetes Day aims to increase an awareness of the effects of diabetes and the complications caused by the disease. What Do People Do? The World Diabetes Day campaign is led by the International Diabetes Federation and its member associations around the world, including the American Diabetes Association, Diabetes UK, Diabetes Australia, the Canadian Diabetes Association, Diabetes South Africa, Diabetes New Zealand and the Diabetic Association of India. These organizations arrange events at international, national and local levels. Events include: Conferences, workshops and seminars for health and public policy professionals. The distribution of information to encourage at risk individuals to be screened for diabetes. Events to highlight diabetes in local and national media, including television, newspapers and Internet publications The World Diabetes Day bike races to increase awareness of diabetes. The distribution of geocoins for use in geocaching (a game for global positioning systems users). Civil leaders around the world issue proclamations on World Diabetes Day to raise awareness of diabetes in their communities. Many events aim to raise money for research into treatments for diabetes. Public Life World Diabetes Day is a global observance and not a public holiday. Background Diabetes is the common name for a range of conditions including diabetes mellitus type one and diabetes mellitus type two, diabetes insipidus and gestational diabetes. These are all conditions, which affect how the pancreas (an organ in the digestive system) secretes insulin or how the body reacts to this hormone. Depending on the type and severity, diabetes is controlled by dietary measures, weight loss, oral medication or injected or inhaled insulin. There is a Continue reading >>

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