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What Is Metformin 1000 Mg

Metformin Sandoz 1000 Mg Tablets

Metformin Sandoz 1000 Mg Tablets

Brand Information Consumer medicine information (CMI) leaflet Please read this leaflet carefully before you start using Metformin Sandoz 1000 mg Tablets. Download CMI (PDF) Download large text CMI (PDF) WHAT IS IN THIS LEAFLET This leaflet answers some common questions about Metformin Sandoz. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking this medicine against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may need to read it again. WHAT METFORMIN SANDOZ IS USED FOR This medicine is used to control blood sugar (glucose) in patients with diabetes mellitus. Metformin Sandoz is used to treat Type 2 diabetes when it cannot be properly controlled by diet and exercise. It can also be used in patients with Type 1 diabetes mellitus where insulin alone is not enough to control your blood glucose levels. Metformin Sandoz can be used alone, or in combination with other medicines for treating diabetes. It contains the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride. Metformin belongs to a group of medicines called oral hypoglycaemics. It works to reduce high levels of blood glucose by helping your body to make better use of the insulin produced by your pancreas. Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the blood glucose levels are not adequately controlled. People with type 2 diabetes are not able to make enough insulin or do not respond normally to the insulin their bodies make. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems including kidney damage, ampu Continue reading >>

Dailymed - Metformin Hydrochloride- Metformin Hydrochloride Tablet, Film Coated

Dailymed - Metformin Hydrochloride- Metformin Hydrochloride Tablet, Film Coated

After administration of a single oral metformin hydrochloride 500 mg tablet with food, geometric mean metformin Cmax and AUC differed less than 5% between pediatric type 2 diabetic patients (12 to 16 years of age) and gender- and weight-matched healthy adults (20 to 45 years of age), all with normal renal function. Metformin pharmacokinetic parameters did not differ significantly between normal subjects and patients with type 2 diabetes when analyzed according to gender (males = 19, females = 16). Similarly, in controlled clinical studies in patients with type 2 diabetes, the antihyperglycemic effect of metformin hydrochloride tablets was comparable in males and females. No studies of metformin pharmacokinetic parameters according to race have been performed. In controlled clinical studies of metformin hydrochloride tablets in patients with type 2 diabetes, the antihyperglycemic effect was comparable in whites (n=249), blacks (n=51), and Hispanics (n=24). In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, multicenter U.S. clinical trial involving obese patients with type 2 diabetes whose hyperglycemia was not adequately controlled with dietary management alone (baseline fasting plasma glucose [FPG] of approximately 240 mg/dL), treatment with metformin hydrochloride tablets (up to 2550 mg/day) for 29 weeks resulted in significant mean net reductions in fasting and postprandial plasma glucose (PPG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 59 mg/dL, 83 mg/dL, and 1.8%, respectively, compared to the placebo group (see Table 2). Table 2: Metformin Hydrochloride Tablets vs Placebo Summary of Mean Changes from Baseline* in Fasting Plasma Glucose, HbA1c, and Body Weight, at Final Visit (29-week study) A 29-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of metformin hydrochloride tablets and glyburide, Continue reading >>

Metformin | Michigan Medicine

Metformin | Michigan Medicine

Brand: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet oblong, white, imprinted with 10 00, BMS 6071 round, white, imprinted with BMS 6060, 500 round, white, imprinted with BMS 6070, 850 oblong, white, imprinted with BMS 6063, 500 oval, white, imprinted with IP 177, 10 00 oval, white, imprinted with Hourglass Logo 4432, 10 00 oblong, peach, imprinted with WPI WPI, 2455 oblong, white, imprinted with APO500, MET oval, white, imprinted with LOGO 4331, 500 oval, white, imprinted with LOGO 4330, 850 What is the most important information I should know about metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin is sometimes used together with insulin or other medications, but metformin is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin? You should not use metformin if you are allergic to it, or if you have: metabolic or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). If you ne Continue reading >>

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage Sr 500mg, 750mg And 1000mg Prolonged Release Tablets

Glucophage SR 500mg, 750mg and 1000mg prolonged release tablets This information is intended for use by health professionals Glucophage SR 500 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 750 mg prolonged release tablets Glucophage SR 1000 mg prolonged release tablets 2. Qualitative and quantitative composition 500 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 500mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 390 mg metformin base. 750 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 750 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 585 mg metformin base. 1000 mg: One prolonged release tablet contains 1000 mg metformin hydrochloride corresponding to 780 mg metformin base. For the full list of excipients, see section 6.1. 500 mg: White to off-white, round, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '500'. 750 mg: White capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '750' and on the other side with 'Merck'. 1000 mg: White to off-white capsule-shaped, biconvex tablet, debossed on one side with '1000' and on the other side with 'MERCK'. Reduction in the risk or delay of the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus in adult, overweight patients with IGT* and/or IFG*, and/or increased HbA1C who are: - at high risk for developing overt type 2 diabetes mellitus (see section 5.1) and - still progressing towards type 2 diabetes mellitus despite implementation of intensive lifestyle change for 3 to 6 months Treatment with Glucophage SR must be based on a risk score incorporating appropriate measures of glycaemic control and including evidence of high cardiovascular risk (see section 5.1). Lifestyle modifications should be continued when metformin is initiated, unless the patient is unable to do so because of medical reasons. *IGT: Impaired Glucose Tolerance; IFG: Impaired Fasting Glucose Trea Continue reading >>

Glumetza Patient Information Including Side Effects

Glumetza Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet Generic Name: metformin (Pronunciation: met FOR min) What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is the most important information I should know about metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion; swelling or rapid weight gain; or fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms. Les Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl 1000mg Er For $7,000+ / Month?!?

Metformin Hcl 1000mg Er For $7,000+ / Month?!?

There is something terribly wrong with Pharmaceutical pricing in our country. Pharmaceutical costs continue to spiral out of control. I have a client ("Susie") who is starting on Medicare for 10/1/2017. A few weeks ago when we reviewed her Prescription costs, she was taking Metformin HCL 1000mg, which is only about $6.50/month retail cost. This is a very reasonable price for a generic drug used to treat a chronic condition like Type 2 diabetes. ​ Recently, Susie had been having some stomach discomfort with the Metformin 1000 HCL so her doctor prescribed her same medication in an Extended Release (ER) form (Metformin HCL 1000mg ER) to minimize the impact on her stomach. On Susie's current group health insurance plan, her copay for the new medication (Metformin HCL 1000mg ER) went up from about $5/month to $30 per month. This was manageable and well worth it since the ER pills reduced/eliminated her stomach discomfort. Last week, Susie notified me of her medication change (from Metformin HCL 1000 mg to Metformin HCL ER 1000mg), so we could re-run her Part D analysis before she goes on Medicare for 10/1/2017. I was absolutely shocked when I updated her medication list on Medicare.gov and saw: (a) the Metformin HCL ER 1000mg was not covered on her Part D formulary (b) the monthly retail cost for the Metformin HCL ER 1000mg was $7,000+ per month!! I figured this had to be a mistake. I called Humana (her Part D Plan) to see what the cost would be for this Metformin ER 1000mg if Susie applied for an Exception to the formulary. The Humana representative said she could probably get an exception to the formulary due to the side effects with the regular Metformin HCL 1000mg. However, Humana is unable to tell us what the cost of the Metformin ER 1000mg will be since it is not lis Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin (mod Vs Osm): What’s The Difference?

Metformin Vs Metformin (mod Vs Osm): What’s The Difference?

Metformin and extended release metformin are used in type 2 diabetes to improve glycemic control in combination with diet and exercise. What are the advantages of extended release metformin? The extended release tablets are taken ONCE DAILY due to their slow release of the medication throughout the day. Extended release tablets are also easier on the stomach which is important for compliance when first starting a new medication. Fortamet and Glumetza are both extended release metformin options, but because the way they release metformin over time is different, they aren’t equivalent to each other. Glumetza is the MOD metformin product. So what does MOD stand for? MOD stands for modified release. Glumetza utilizes advanced polymer delivery technology known as AcuForm® (for the 500 mg tablet) and Smartcoat® (for the 1000 mg tablet). It delivers the metformin to the site of absorption, the duodenum, over a time span of 8 – 9 hours. The tablet then remains in the stomach for an extended period until all of the active drug is released. Does Glumetza have a generic? No. Glumetza does not currently have a substitutable generic equivalent. What is the MAX dose and available strengths of Glumetza? Glumetza comes in 500 mg and 1000 mg extended release tablets, with a max dose of 2000 mg per day. Fortamet is the OSM metformin product. So what does OSM stand for? OSM stands for osmotic release. Fortamet (and its generic equivalents) use single-composition osmotic technology. When you swallow the tablet, water is taken up through the membrane of the pill, which in turn dissolves the drug in the core so it can exit through the laser drilled ports in the membrane. The rate of drug delivery is constant, and will continue as long as there is undissolved drug present in the core ta Continue reading >>

Metformin Hcl Er

Metformin Hcl Er

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL ER Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually once daily with the evening meal. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Do not crush or chew this medication. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects. Also, do not split the tablets unless they have a score line and your doctor or pharmacist tells you to do so. Swallow the whole or split tablet without crushing or chewing. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regula Continue reading >>

Metformin Er 1,000 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24hr

Metformin Er 1,000 Mg Tablet,extended Release 24hr

Rarely, too much metformin can build up in the body and cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is more likely if you are an older adult, if you have kidney or liver disease, dehydration, heart failure, heavy alcohol use, if you have surgery, if you have X-ray or scanning procedures that use iodinated contrast, or if you are using certain drugs. For some conditions, your doctor may tell you to stop taking this medication for a short time. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.Stop taking this medication and get medical help right away if you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, or stomach pain with nausea/vomiting/diarrhea. Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.Metformin may be used with lifestyle changes such as diet and exercise to prevent d Continue reading >>

Metformin 1000 Mg Tablets

Metformin 1000 Mg Tablets

UK Edition. Click here for US version. Active substance(s): METFORMIN HYDROCHLORIDE / METFORMIN HYDROCHLORIDE / METFORMIN HYDROCHLORIDE View full screen / Print PDF » Download PDF ⇩ PDF Transcript PATIENT INFORMATION LEAFLET Metformin 1000 mg film−coated Tablets (metformin hydrochloride) Read all of this leaflet carefully before you start taking this medicine because it contains important information for you. Keep this leaflet. You may need to read it again. If you have any further questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. This medicine has been prescribed for you only. Do not pass it on to others. It may harm them, even if their signs of illness are the same as yours. If you get any side effects, talk to your doctor or pharmacist. This includes any possible side effects not listed in this leaflet. See section 4. What is in this leaflet: 1 2 3 1 What Metformin is and what it is used for What you need to know before you take Metformin How to take Metformin What Metformin is and what it is used for What Metformin is Metformin contains metformin, a medicine to treat diabetes. It belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that makes your body take in glucose (sugar) from the blood. Your body uses glucose to produce energy or stores it for future use. If you have diabetes, your pancreas does not make enough insulin or your body is not able to use properly the insulin it produces. This leads to a high level of glucose in your blood. Metformin helps to lower your blood glucose to as normal a level as possible. If you are an overweight adult, taking Metformin over a long period of time also helps to lower the risk of complications associated with diabetes. Metformin is associated with either a stable body weight or mode Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Apo-metformin Xr 1000 Mg Tablets

Apo-metformin Xr 1000 Mg Tablets

Australian Government Department of Health Recall - risk of injury due to potential contamination with plastic fragment Consumers and health professionals are advised that Apotex, in consultation with the TGA, is recalling one batch of APO-Metformin XR 1000 mg tablets (batch number E16539). APO-Metformin XR 1000 mg tablets are used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults and children over 10 years of age. There has been one report of a small piece of white plastic (likely from a cable/zip tie) being embedded in a tablet from this batch. The plastic may or may not be visible, as it could be completely embedded in the tablet. If a small piece of plastic is swallowed with the tablet there is a small risk of choking or perforation of the gastrointestinal tract. The plastic is not toxic or carcinogenic. No other batches are affected by this recall. If you or someone you provide care for takes APO-Metformin XR 1000 mg tablets, check the batch number on the package to see if it is from the affected batch (batch number E16539). If you have a product from the affected batch, return it to a pharmacy for a refund or replacement. If you have any other questions or concerns about this issue, talk to your health professional. If you treat patients who take APO-Metformin XR 1000 mg tablets, please be aware of this issue. Apotex is writing to pharmacists to provide further information about this issue, including details of the recall procedure. Please inspect your stock and quarantine any products from the affected batch (batch number E16539). Patients returning unused or partially used packs should be provided a full refund or replacement. If pharmacists or any other health professionals notice or receive reports of any suspected contamination of other batches of APO-Metformin XR 1000 mg Continue reading >>

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