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What Is Lancing Device In Glucometer?

Glucometer Test Kit

Glucometer Test Kit

Background Diabetes mellitus effects an estimated 16 million people in the United States. An additional five million people have the disease and do not realize it. Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that affects the pancreas's ability to produce or respond to insulin. The two major forms of diabetes are type I and type II. Both types of diabetes can have elevated blood sugar levels due to insufficiencies of insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a key regulator of the body's metabolism. After meals, food is digested in the stomach and intestines. Carbohydrates are broken down into sugar molecules—of which glucose is one—and proteins are broken down into amino acids. Glucose and amino acids are absorbed directly into the bloodstream, and blood glucose levels rise. Normally, the rise in blood glucose levels signals important cells in the pancreas—called beta-cells—to secrete insulin, which pours into the bloodstream. Insulin then enables glucose and amino acids to enter cells in the body where, along with other hormones, it directs whether these nutrients will be burned for energy or stored for future use. As blood sugar falls to pre-meal levels, the pancreas reduces the production of insulin, and the body uses its stored energy until the next meal provides additional nutrients. In type I diabetes, the beta-cells in the pancreas that produce insulin are gradually destroyed; eventually insulin deficiency is absolute. Without insulin to move glucose into cells, blood sugar levels become excessively high, a condition known as hyperglycemia. Because the body cannot utilize the sugar, it spills over into the urine and is lost. Weakness, weight loss, and excessive hunger and thirst are among several indicators of this disease. Patients become depen Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Lancing Devices For Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Regarding Lancing Pain

Comparison Of Lancing Devices For Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose Regarding Lancing Pain

Go to: Abstract Self-monitoring of blood glucose empowers diabetes patients to effectively control their blood glucose (BG) levels. A potential barrier to frequent BG controls is lancing pain, intrinsically linked to pricking the finger several times a day. In this study, we compared different state-of-the-art lancing devices from leading manufacturers regarding lancing pain, and we intended to identify lancing devices that are less painful. First, 165 subjects compared 6 different BG monitoring systems—consisting of a lancing device and a BG meter—at home for 36 days and at least 3 BG tests per day. Second, the subjects directly compared 6 different lancing devices—independent from a BG meter—in a laboratory setting. The test results were collected in questionnaires, and lancing pain was rated on a numerical rating scale. One hundred fifty-seven subjects were included in the analysis. Accu-Chek BG monitoring systems were significantly (p ≤ .006) preferred to competitor BG monitoring systems and were rated by >50% of the subjects as “less painful” than competitor BG monitoring systems. Accu-Chek lancing devices were significantly (p < .001) preferred to competitor lancing devices and were rated by >60% of the subjects as “less painful” than competitor lancing devices. We found significant differences in lancing pain between lancing devices. Diabetes patients clearly preferred lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. In order to improve patient compliance with respect to an adequate glycemic control, the medical staff should preferentially prescribe lancing devices that cause less lancing pain. Keywords: lancing device, lancing pain, pain rating, self-monitoring of blood glucose Continue reading >>

Blood Glucometer Manual

Blood Glucometer Manual

Before you get started, here’s what you’ll need 1. Download Noom Health. If you haven’t done so already, download the Noom Health app from the Google Play Store. 2. Turn on your glucometer. Hold the memory button on the side of your glucometer until the display turns on. Note: Don’t put the testing strip in the glucometer yet. 3. Turn on Bluetooth Open phone settings a) Go to your phone’s settings and find Bluetooth. Tap the toggle b) If Bluetooth is off, tap the toggle to turn Bluetooth on. 4. Pair the glucometer with your phone Exit settings b) Press the home button to exit Settings. Note: If you still don’t see your BG5 device in the accessory list, make sure your meter is turned on (display is lit up). 6. Pull the cap off the lancing device Pull off the cap of the white lancing device (the cap has a small hole at the top.) 7. Insert the blue lancet into the lancing device Insert a new blue lancet (with the blue circle facing away from the lancing device) firmly into the top of the lancing device. 8. Reveal the needle Twist the blue circle off the top of the lancet to reveal the needle. 9. Snap the cap back on Snap the cap back on the lancing device. 10. Set the lancing level Twist the cap to set the lancing level between 1 and 5. Note: 1 is for thin skin, 5 is for thicker skin. 3 is the norm for most people 11. Tap “Do more” Open the app and tap the “Do more” card at the bottom of the home screen 12. Tap “Take blood glucose” In the app, choose the time that you are measuring your blood glucose. If the display on your glucometer is no longer lit up, press and hold the memory button on the side of your glucometer until the display appears. Insert the test strip into the glucometer with the red arrow pointing toward the glucometer until it locks Continue reading >>

Lancets & Lancing Devices For Diabetes: Read This Before You Buy

Lancets & Lancing Devices For Diabetes: Read This Before You Buy

Lancets are small needles that are used to prick the skin to obtain a blood sample. Many lancets can be used with a lancing device that helps to make it more effective and less painful, however they can be used without one by just sticking the skin with the needle. Once a small blood sample is available, it can easily be put into a machine to run a test. As you can see from the image above, there are many different brands of lancets available. There are a few tests that can be done using a small drop of blood that the lancet provides. For people with diabetes, they can easily check their blood sugar levels. Using a glucometer, which is the machine that tests the blood sugar, they can quickly find out if their sugar is at a good number or not. How do the lancet and the lancing device work together Although the lancet can be used alone to get a sample, it is much easier to use the lancing device along with it. The device provides a quick “punch” of the needle into the skin to make an effective and less painful stick. OneTouch, which is a popular brand of diabetic supplies, has a device that is easy to use. Each brand’s device will be a little different, but the general idea is the same. The following steps demonstrate how to use the OneTouch device. Step 1. Always wash your hands before checking your blood sugar. If there is bacteria on your hands and it enters into your blood, it can cause a major infection! First, take the cap off of the device and insert a new lancet with the safety cap still on. (If it is removed first, you can poke yourself!) When you insert the lancet, do not twist it around. It should easily fit. See the image below for a better description. Step 2. Take the safety guard off of the lancet to expose the needle. This can easily be done by simpl Continue reading >>

Cdc And Fda: Don’t Share!

Cdc And Fda: Don’t Share!

It would seem to go without saying that devices used to puncture the skin — such as lancets and insulin pen needles — should never be shared by more than one person. In fact, these components are not officially considered reusable even by the same person, although as we noted in a previous post here at Diabetes Flashpoints, many people with diabetes reuse them anyway. But what about the reusable devices that these disposable components are paired with: lancing (fingerstick) devices and insulin pens? Can more than one person safely share them? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently addressed this question as it relates to devices in health-care settings. In coordinated statements, the agencies announced their position that lancing devices should never be used to obtain a blood sample from more than one person. The FDA noted that there has been a constant increase in reported instances of bloodborne infections being transmitted in health-care settings over the last 10–15 years, particularly involving the hepatitis B virus. The agency blames, in part, unclear labeling of multiple-use lancing devices for this trend. It has not always been made clear, says the agency, whether a device was approved for use on multiple patients or simply for multiple uses on the same patient. Furthermore, cleaning and disinfection instructions for these devices may have been inadequate. Therefore, even for devices the FDA previously cleared for use on multiple patients, the agencies say this practice should be discontinued. They even recommend using devices that physically cannot be reused, such as those on which the lancing blade permanently retracts after one use. But the agencies do not stop at lancing devices. They als Continue reading >>

The Lifespan Of A Lancet

The Lifespan Of A Lancet

One Drop: Diabetes Management Made Simple Ask ten people with diabetes how often they change their lancet, and youll likely come away with ten different answers. Some people prefer to change their lancets with each use, some prefer a daily, weekly or monthly swap, and some go even longer. Out of all the diabetes to-dos, lancet changing practices probably vary the most person to person. The technical answer, according to manufacturers and most healthcare providers, is to change your lancet with each use. This is a precautionary recommendation meant to guard against painful fingersticks, changes in the skin, and infection. 1 , 2 , 3 However, home glucose testing has come a long way from when it first became available in the 1980s. Nowadays, meters require much smaller blood samples, lancing devices deliver shallower pokes, and we have better lancets. While its true that any needle used multiple times will become dull and require more force, many people do not notice a major difference after using the same lancet for multiple pokes. A simple rotation of fingerstick sites (use each side of the pad of the fingertip) can help guard against skin changes from dulling lancets. And, as long as lancets are used by only one person (whose hands are clean), the risk of infection is very low.(For what its worth, even a studyon syringe re-use concluded that diabetic patients frequently reuse disposable syringes, without apparent harmful effect.) In daily life with diabetes, sometimes theres no convenient place nearby to dispose of a used lancet. Sometimes there are no new lancets on hand to replace one weve just used. And, lets face it, sometimes we may just not want to. In the grand scheme of things, a fresh lancet is not as critical to your health and well-being as the many other se Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions (faqs) Regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Frequently Asked Questions (faqs) Regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) regarding Assisted Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration The following FAQs summarize inquiries from healthcare personnel received by CDC regarding best practices for performance of assisted blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration, including questions related to cleaning, disinfection, and storage of blood glucose monitoring equipment. These FAQs are not intended as a comprehensive resource for all issues related to blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration, and additional considerations may be necessary for certain clinical situations or settings. View more detailed information related to assisted blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration.Visit CDCs Injection Safety website for additional information regarding injection safety and CDCs Sharps Safety website information related to sharps safety and safe disposal of sharps in healthcare settings. Healthcare personnel are also encouraged to consult guidance provided by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (links provided in responses below) as well as the manufacturers of the devices (blood glucose meters, fingerstick/lancing devices, insulin pens) in use at their facilities. What is the difference between self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) and assisted monitoring of blood glucose (AMBG)? With self-monitoring of blood glucose, individuals perform all steps of monitoring for themselves. With assisted monitoring of blood glucose, the same steps are followed but testing is performed for an individual or multiple persons by someone else (e.g., a caregiver or healthcare professional) [ 1 , 2 ]. Assisted monitoring of blood glucose is typically performed in healthcare settings such as clinics, hospitals, and long-term care settings (e.g., sk Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Compatibility With Lancets And Test Strips

Blood Glucose Meter Compatibility With Lancets And Test Strips

Blood Glucose Meter Compatibility with Lancets and Test Strips BLOOD GLUCOSE METER COMPATIBILITY WITH LANCETS AND TEST STRIPS BLOOD GLUCOSE METER COMPATIBILITY WITH LANCETS AND TEST STRIPS ABBOTT LABS (888) 5225226 abbottdiabetescare.com Precision Xtra, Precision Xtra Blood Bketone ASCENSIA DIABETES CARE (800) 3488100 contournextpro.com (OneTouch UltraSoft lancets still available for OneTouch UltraSoft Lancing Device and Penlet Plus ) NOVA DIABETES CARE (800) 6817390 novacares.com PRODIGY DIABETES CARE (800) 2432636 prodigymeter.com ROCHE DIAGNOSTICS (800) 8588072 accuchek.com TRIVIDIA HEALTH (800) 8036025 trividiahealth.com OneTouch UltraSoft Lancing Device and Penlet Plus no longer manufactured. Copyright 2018 Haymarket Media, Inc. All Rights Reserved This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in any form without prior authorization. Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of Haymarket Media's Privacy Policy and Terms & Conditions . Continue reading >>

Mobile | Accu-chek

Mobile | Accu-chek

Approximately 2000 measurements with time and date Temperature: +10 C to +40 C (+50 F to +104 F) Temperature flagging: +8 C to +10 C or +40 C to +42 C (+46.4 F to 50 F or 104 F to 107.6 F) 2 alkaline-manganese batteries (1.5 V; type AAA, LR 03, AM 4 or micro) or 2 lithium batteries (1.5 V; type AAA, FR 03, L 92), backup battery (not changeable): 3-volt lithium coin cell type CR1025 WARNING- KEEP BATTERIES OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.If you suspect your child has swallowed or inserted a button (coin cell) battery immediately call the 24-hour Poisons Information Centre Approximately 500 measurements, or approximately 1 year. This could be less if settings that require more power consumption are used, e.g. if the brightness of the display is set to level 3, or the volume is set to level 4 or 5, or in acoustic mode. 121 x 63 x 20 mm (L x W x H) (with lancing device) Approximately 129 g (with batteries, test cassette, lancing device,and lancet drum) With battery: -10 C to +50 C (+14 F to +122 F) Without battery: -25 C to +70 C (-13 F to +158 F) With batteries and with test cassette: +2 C to 30 C Between 15% and85% with relative humidity during testing 7 individually programmable test reminders Lancets are advanced by rotating the advance lever Continue reading >>

Lancing Device Love: Multiclix Vs. Delica

Lancing Device Love: Multiclix Vs. Delica

Pricking our fingers multiple times a day isn't exactly something most of us get excited about, but I've discovered that some folks out there do get excited about the lancing device they use. While most of us use the lancer that came for free with our meter (i.e. we don't give it much thought), there are a couple of brand-name models that really seem to get people talking. They are the ACCU-CHEK Mutliclix from Roche — which I see all the time at diabetes conferences — and the new OneTouch Delica, which Lifescan just released this past June. To have a closer look at these, I thought it would be fun to recruit a couple of "fans" to share their thoughts on why they like their respective device... who knows, maybe we'll get a couple of converts? Photo: Christopher of "Don't Fear Diabetes" Team Multiclix "The Multiclix truly is the best lancing device ever created. First of all, the lancing devices that came with my other meters (e.g. the UltraSoft) used 28 gauge lancets. The MultiClix comes with 30 gauge lancets. Higher number means smaller lancet, which means less pain. There are 11 depth settings on the Multiclix compared to the 5 depths on the other devices I was using. My Multiclix is currently set at .5 — the lowest setting possible, and I have no trouble getting an adequate size sample. I think, by far, the best part of the Multiclix technology and what sets it apart from the rest of the lancing devices is the use of a drum of preloaded lancets. With the other models (although the Delica offers some improvements in this area) there is nothing holding the lancet in place after you hit the trigger. The spring that triggers the lancet wobbles side-to-side as it moves toward your finger. Obviously, any movement as it enters your skin causes unnecessary pain. The dru Continue reading >>

How To Determine Which Gauge To Use For Your Diabetic Lancing Device

How To Determine Which Gauge To Use For Your Diabetic Lancing Device

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), approximately 1.7 million Americans are diagnosed with Diabetes and if current trends remain the same, 1 in 3 Americans will have diabetes by the year 2050. Broken down further, there are approximately 4,657 new diabetic patients diagnosed every day that are having to experience the process of pricking their fingers for the first time in order to read their blood sugar. If you fall under this category, undoubtedly, your doctor has given you instructions on the process and the different products you will become accustomed to such as a blood glucose meter, test strips, lancet pins, control solutions, insulin pumps, and lancets. Yet, many times a Doctor will just give an overview and send a patient on their way with many questions unanswered. Finding tips and tricks to make the process of checking your blood sugar in a quick and accurate manner are important to diabetic patients. Yet, finding ways to reduce the discomfort of pricking the fingers for blood samples is usually on the top of every diabetics patient list. Lancing Devices and Lancets A lancing device is a spring loaded mechanism that, when loaded with a lancet, pricks a finger quickly in order to provide a small sample of blood for the test strip. Most of the lancing devices today are equipped with 2 - 3 depth settings. The higher settings will penetrate deeper while the lower settings are for individuals with thin, sensitive skin such as senior citizens patients and children. The higher settings are for patients who have thick callouses on their skin which will allow the lancet to push through the callouses. The lancet is a sterile grade steel needle encased in a plastic cylinder used to prick the finger. There are 3 common gauges that the needle comes in wh Continue reading >>

Blood Lancet

Blood Lancet

Box of disposable lancets. Blood-sampling device with a lancet at the tip. A blood lancet, or simply lancet, is a small medical implement used for capillary blood sampling. A blood lancet is similar to a small scalpel but with a double-edged blade or needle. Lancets are used to make punctures, such as a fingerstick, to obtain small blood specimens. Blood lancets are generally disposable. Lancets are also used to prick the skin in skin testing for allergies.[1] A blood-sampling device, also known as a lancing device, is an instrument equipped with a lancet. It is also most commonly used by diabetics during blood glucose monitoring. The depth of skin penetration can be adjusted for various skin thicknesses. Long lancing devices are used for fetal scalp blood testing to get a measure of the acid base status of the fetus. Blood sampling[edit] Main article: Capillary blood sampling The small capillary blood samples obtained can be tested for blood glucose, hemoglobin, and many other blood components. [edit] External links[edit] Lancet In Diabetes Self Management Continue reading >>

All-in-one Smart Glucose Meter

All-in-one Smart Glucose Meter

The Dario All-In-One Smart Glucose Meter is specially designed to fit your lifestyle in the digital age. This sleek, complete glucose monitoring solution includes a simple-to-use glucose meter, a disposable test strip cartridge holding 25 test strips, and lancing device – and easily fits in your pocket. Using the technology and mobility of your smartphone, the Dario connects to your mobile device and automatically logs your blood glucose measurements, sharing your results with caregivers and doctors – no matter where you are on the globe. Why You’ll Love the Dario Smart Glucose Meter Connects directly to your Smartphone – no need for extra cables or adapters Rapid results – receive your blood glucose reading within 6 seconds Accurate – Dario accuracy meets ISO standards with only a small blood sample Pocket-Size Meter – easily fits into your purse or pocket, no need for a bulky pouch or case Battery free – the power comes from the SmartPhone. No need to carry extra batteries for your glucose meter Strip Cartridge Each strips cartridge holds 25 disposable strips. Reloading your strips is simple, just pull out the old cartridge and insert a new one. Glucose Meter The simple-to-use Dario Smart Glucose Meter automatically tracks your blood sugars with a tiny meter that plugs into your phone’s audio jack. Blood glucose readings are directly tracked, charted, and analyzed for you. Lancing Device The Dario All-In-One Smart Glucose Meter contains a lancing device for convenient blood glucose testing. Simply place your finger on the lancet end of the Dario, pull down on the lancet slider, and push the release button to use. Smart Mobile Device Integration The Dario Smart Glucose Meter is cleared for use with a variety of mobile devices. The glucose meter pops o Continue reading >>

Glucometer Devices

Glucometer Devices

Glucometer Devices is a topic covered in the Johns Hopkins Diabetes Guide. Official website of the Johns Hopkins Antibiotic (ABX), HIV, Diabetes, and Psychiatry Guides, powered by Unbound Medicine. Johns Hopkins Guide App for iOS, iPhone, iPad, and Android included. Explore these free sample topics: -- The first section of this topic is shown below -- Self monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) allows patients to evaluate their individual response to therapy and assess whether glycemic targets are being achieved. The American Diabetes Association recommends SMBG in people with diabetes on intensive management prior to meals and snacks, at bedtime, occasionally postprandially, prior to exercise, when they suspect low blood glucose, after treating low blood glucose until they are normoglycemic, and prior to critical tasks such as driving. [1] The patient’s specific needs and goals should dictate SMBG frequency and timing. Integrating SMBG results into diabetes management can be a useful tool for guiding medical nutrition therapy and physical activity, preventing hypoglycemia, and adjusting medications (particularly prandial insulin doses). SMBG has been shown to improve the efficacy and safety of diabetes therapy and improve A1C in type 1 diabetes and gestational diabetes.[3] Factors to consider when choosing a glucose meter include: ease of use, cost, insurance coverage and availability of strips and lancets, display screen, need for “speaking” (audio capability) meter for low visual acuity, memory capacity, download capability to computer or cloud, and dexterity issues. Several meters are available and most come with a lancing device. Lancets vary in size with 33 gauge the smallest. The smallest recommended for alternate site (not the fingers) is 28 gauge. Smaller lan Continue reading >>

Genteel Lancing Device For Pain-free Glucose Testing Anywhere On Body (video)

Genteel Lancing Device For Pain-free Glucose Testing Anywhere On Body (video)

Diabetics checking their blood sugar levels usually have to prick their finger to get a sufficient draw for the glucometer to do its job. Some newer glucometers work with smaller blood samples and are able to take blood from the inside of the arm where there are fewer nerves to cause pain. Now a new device called Genteel can allow patients to take blood samples from just about anywhere on the body with little pain. The device prevents pain by vibrating the skin just before the lance pierces it and by creating a vacuum around the sample site at the moment of penetration. The actual piercing of the skin is done much faster than with traditional devices, taking only .018 of a second for the needle to pop in and out. Additionally, the contact tip has six levels of depth control to accurately set the penetration level to match the location from where the blood is drawn. The Genteel costs $129, a bit high compared to competing device, though it may prove quite valuable for kids and others not used to regular prickly blood draws. It uses standard FDA approved square lancets and works with whatever glucometer you’re used to. Here’s a video explaining how the Genteel works: Product page: Genteel… Continue reading >>

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