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What Is Good For Diabetic Nerve Pain?

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic neuropathy definition and facts Diabetes is thought to damage nerves as a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly causes: Autonomic neuropathy causes symptoms related to dysfunction of an organ system, such as: Diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy is usually done by a clinical exam. There is no cure for diabetic neuropathy, but treatments are available to manage the symptoms. Diabetic nerve pain may be controlled by medications such as tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine (Cymbalta), or certain antiseizure medications. Keeping tight control of blood sugar levels is the best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy and other complications of diabetes. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy? The symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy depend upon the type of neuropathy that is present. Signs and symptoms can also vary in severity among affected people. Signs and symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include: Numbness or tingling of the feet and lower legs Pain or burning sensations Loss of sensation in the feet or lower legs Sometimes, but less commonly, these symptoms can occur in the hands or arms Signs and symptoms of diabetic proximal neuropathy include: Pain, usually on one side, in the hips, buttocks, or thighs Signs and symptoms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy depend upon the organ system that is involved and can include: Feeling full after eating a small amount Inability to empty the bladder completely Decrease in vaginal lubrication in women Rapid resting heartbeat Signs and symptoms of diabetic focal neuropathy also depend upon the location of the affected nerve. The symptoms can appear suddenly. It usually does not cause a long t Continue reading >>

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Peripheral Neuropathy And Diabetes

Pain. Tingling. Numbness. If you have a type of nerve damage from diabetes called diabetic peripheral neuropathy, chances are you've experienced these symptoms, especially in your hands and feet. The discomfort can affect your mood, sleep, and overall quality of life. Prescription medications can help. But research shows that they only ease the pain by about 30% to 50%. How can you bridge the gap? Learn how you can get relief now -- and prevent the condition from getting worse down the road. If don't manage your diabetes, your blood glucose levels get too high. Over time, excess blood sugar can damage your peripheral nerves. These connect your brain and spinal cord to the rest of your body. That could set the stage for diabetic neuropathy. If you bring your blood sugar into the healthy range (a hemoglobin A1C reading of 7% or lower), you'll reduce your risk of nerve damage by 60%, according to research from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. "Healthy blood sugar levels can slow the process and ease the pain of diabetic neuropathy," says Aaron I. Vinik, MD, PhD, the director of the research and neuroendocrine unit at Eastern Virginia Medical School. How can you keep your blood sugar in check? First, talk to your doctor. "A rapid drop can actually make the pain worse," Vinik says. Your doctor can suggest changes to gently bring your levels down into the healthy zone, like: Eat a diet high that's in fruits, vegetables, low-fat dairy, and whole grains; contains a moderate amount of fish, poultry, nuts, and beans; and has a very low amount of red meat. Manage your stress levels. Exercise for at least 30 minutes, 5 days a week. If your doctor prescribes medication for your blood sugar, take it as recommended. Acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofe Continue reading >>

Using Marijuana To Treat Diabetic Nerve Pain

Using Marijuana To Treat Diabetic Nerve Pain

With commentary by lead study author Mark Steven Wallace, MD, chair of the Division of Pain Management at the University of California, San Diego A new randomized, controlled study from the University of California at San Diego has shown that inhaling cannabis can blunt diabetic neuropathic pain for several hours. “We found that the more concentrated the dose, the more relief people got,” says lead author Mark Steven Wallace, MD, chair of the Division of Pain Management at the University of California, San Diego. In the study, published in the July issue of the Journal of Pain, Dr. Wallace and his team recruited 16 patients with pain in their feet from diabetes-related nerve damage. They randomly assigned them to inhale one of three doses of cannabis using vaporization, a process that heats the leaf enough to release the active ingredients but not hot enough to flash the leaf into smoke. (This method makes pot’s effects peak faster and avoids the hazardous carbon monoxide associated with burning the leaves.) Some participants got a placebo. After a two week-break, they crossed over to a different dosage and repeated the test. While participants did get high—they reported euphoria and sedation according to their dose, they also reported effective pain relief. They rated their spontaneous pain lower, and were also less bothered by a gentle stroke with a foam brush and a pinprick with a thin probe on their more painful foot. The pain relief lasted four hours, with the placebo group experiencing a pain intensity score that was higher than all the treatment groups. The testers who inhaled the highest dose reported the least pain. “There is a lot of evidence on the positive effects of cannabis on the treatment of neuropathic pain,” Dr. Wallace says. “However, th Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nerve Pain: Causes

Diabetic Nerve Pain: Causes

View as slideshow Diabetes is a condition characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. Diabetic nerve pain (also called diabetic neuropathy) is a complication of diabetes that is more common in people who have had diabetes for more than 25 years. Researchers are still trying to elucidate how prolonged exposure to high blood sugar levels contributes to diabetic nerve pain. However, the exact cause of diabetic nerve pain is probably the result of a combination of factors, including: damage to the blood vessels that supply oxygen and other nutrients to the nerves nerve inflammation as a result of an overreactive immune system nerve damage as a result of trauma or a coexisting medical condition such as rheumatoid arthritis other metabolic factors such as abnormally high blood lipid levels, low insulin levels, or high blood pressure an inherited susceptibility to nerve damage lifestyle choices such as obesity, smoking or excessive alcohol use. Symptoms Of Diabetic Nerve Pain 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes develop some form of neuropathy, although some may experience no symptoms at all. Nerve damage occurs slowly, over a number of years, and almost every organ system can be affected, including the digestive tract, heart, and sex organs. Pain and tingling, a numbness or a loss of feeling in the hands, arms, feet or legs is the most commonly reported symptom. Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, indigestion, diarrhea or constipation may signal nerve damage to the gut but be wrongly attributed to some other cause. Other symptoms may include: a wasting of the muscles in the feet or hands dizziness or feeling faint when going from lying down or sitting to standing erectile dysfunction in men or vaginal dryness in women urination problems feeling g Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Diabetic Neuropathy - Effective Treatments

Patient Comments: Diabetic Neuropathy - Effective Treatments

Please describe what treatments have been effective for your diabetic neuropathy. These comments seem to address prevention or symptomatic relief of neuropathy. For cure, by addressing the underlying neuropathy, I was advocated alpha-lipoic acid and parenteral C-peptide, amongst others. I am a late-onset (age 67) type 1 diabetes mellitus patient and I have adopted these recommendations for about 10 years now (I am 85). This seems to have halted my neuropathic deterioration and maybe effected some improvement. I feel this is a research field well worth further study. I have been dealing with diabetic neuropathy for more than four years. I have been a diabetic since 1996 and I suffer also with gastroparesis, and also chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction. However, I take Lyrica 300 mg twice daily for the neuropathy. I have had an increase in weight of almost 25 pounds within 6 to 8 months. But the Lyrica seems to be the only thing that has helped. I also have a feeding tube for which I have had so many replacements, which my doctor says is due to the gastroparesis. I have had idiopathic neuropathy for 18 months. It is triggered by certain foods and drinks, and exacerbated by stress. Daily use of Forskolin, ALA (alpha lipoic acid), ALCAR (acetyl L-carnitine), evening primrose oil, and fish oil have gotten it under control. A lot of money and time spend researching and experimenting because neurologists and their drugs have been worthless. I've had periodic neuropathy nerve pain in my hands and feet for 9 months now. I control the pain by decreasing my sugar intake and using oregano oil with P 73 at bedtime and it works well. Wipe down hand and feet with rubbing alcohol and apply the oregano oil. The best and just about only effective treatment for my diabetic neuropathy ha Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

If you have diabetes and shooting, burning, pins and needles pain in your feet or hands, you could have painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy—also known as diabetic nerve pain. It is a common complication of diabetes. The most common cause is poorly controlled blood sugar over time. Diabetic nerve pain can take years to develop. In the early stages, you may have no signs at all, and then only start to feel a tingling or numbness in your feet. As it progresses, you may also feel the pain in your hands and it is often worse at night. This means that your nerves may be damaged for a long time before you experience painful symptoms. Nerve damage can’t be reversed, but controlling your blood sugar can help prevent further damage. Talk to your doctor if you experience any symptoms of diabetic nerve pain. Symptoms of diabetic nerve pain These are some of the most common symptoms of diabetic nerve pain: Shooting Burning Pins and needles Numbness Electric shock-like Throbbing Tingling Stinging Stabbing Radiating Sensitivity to touch How is diabetic nerve pain different from other pain? There are two types of pain—muscle pain or nerve pain. Both types of pain are your body’s way of telling you that something is wrong but each has its own cause, symptoms, and management. Muscle pain is a "protective" form of pain. It is caused by something specific like an injury or inflammation. The nerves in the injured muscle or joint send electric signals to the brain as a warning that damage has occurred and the activity you’re doing is causing harm. If you limit or stop the harmful activity, muscle pain can get better over time. Nerve pain is a "non-protective" form of pain. It occurs when your nerves are damaged by an injury or disease, such as diabetes. Your nerves send extra el Continue reading >>

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications are used to control the pain associated with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Unfortunately, at this time, there aren’t any medications to treat and prevent diabetic nerve pain (another name for diabetic neuropathy); the only way to do that is through careful control of blood glucose levels. There are many medication options to relieve pain associated with peripheral nerve damage. You should work carefully with your doctor to figure out what medications are best for you. If you’d like to learn more about treatments for the other types of diabetic neuropathy, this section of the article reviews treatment options for autonomic, proximal, and focal neuropathy. Medication Warning Because of the possible interactions and side effects, always discuss medications with your doctor—even if they’re “just” over-the-counter. This is particularly important when you have diabetes because these over-the-counter medications may have interactions with other medications you’re using. Over-the-counter Medications for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy For people in the early stages of diabetic neuropathy—when the pain isn’t severe—over-the-counter medications may be enough to relieve the pain. However, people with more advanced nerve damage may not find over-the-counter medications helpful. For diabetic neuropathy, you may want to try: Acetaminophen: This is a painkiller, also known as an analgesic. Tylenol is an example of acetaminophen, and it works by blocking pain messages to the brain. In essence, acetaminophen makes it harder for the “pain” signal to travel through the nerves and to the brain, and therefore, the brain doesn’t know that it should be feeling pain. Possible side effects include liver damage, but that’s after taking large quantities fo Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy At Home

Ten Ways To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy At Home

TEN WAYS TO TREAT DIABETIC NEUROPATHY AT HOME Millions of people suffer with diabetic neuropathy. Millions of people suffer with diabetic neuropathy. Medicines treating this condition can only decrease the nerve pain to about 50 percent. Because of this and the fact that many people do not like the side effects of the drugs, people are finding alternative methods for treating neuropathy. Experts say the trend toward self-care is a good thing and there are many things that you can do at home to help yourself decrease nerve pain. Diabetic neuropathy is the result of nerve damage caused by the toxic effects of high blood sugars and poor circulation. As the condition progresses, numbness occurs in the feet, hands, and legs. Damage to the nerves can also cause them to misfire, causing extreme pain during simple touch responses or for no reason at all. People describe the pain as burning, electrical shocks or pins and needles. About 25 percent of diabetics report pain ranging from annoying to debilitating. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a complication of diabetes and the people dealing with the pain from this condition need to try other remedies than just medicines to help them manage the pain. Here are the top ten strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy at home. Some you may have heard about, some are new surprises. When it comes managing the pain of diabetic neuropathy, nothing beats controlling the blood sugar. Doctors would agree that this is the No. 1 strategy and is probably the whole top ten. After all, it is the toxic effects of high blood sugar that brings on the pain associated with neuropathy. Studies have shown that diabetic patients who religiously control their blood sugar levels stop the nerve damage and improve the pain from neuropathy. In fact, some d Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

Nerve Pain

Nerve Pain

caused by diabetes, known as diabetic peripheral neuropathy, can be severe, constant, and hard to treat. It may start as a tingling feeling, followed by numbness and pain. But there are two key points that everyone with diabetes and peripheral neuropathy should know: Controlling your blood sugar can keep the pain from getting worse and improve your health. Medications can help relieve nerve pain, make you more comfortable, and improve your quality of life. If you have diabetes and peripheral neuropathy, talk to your doctor about how to manage your blood sugar levels. That may mean you need to take insulin. Once you're doing all you can to keep your blood sugar in check -- including diet, meal planning, exercise, and medication -- ask the doctor which pain treatment could best relieve the rest of your symptoms. There are many medications that can ease nerve pain and help you function at near-normal levels. But you may need to try several different types before you find the one that works best. Some people find relief right on drugstore shelves. Common pain relievers and some skin creams may help. It depends on how severe your pain is. Talk to your doctor before taking any product. Even over-the-counter medications can interact with other drugs or cause severe side effects. Here are some options: NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) reduce inflammation and relieve pain. Those available without a prescription include aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen. But NSAIDs are known to increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, especially when taken in high doses. They can also cause harmful side effects like stomach irritation and bleeding if you take them for a long time. Although the risk is low, they can also lead to kidney damage, which may be more likely in people wi Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

How To Deal With Nerve Pain If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes , you know it well: Too much sugar isn’t good for you. People whose blood sugar is too high or difficult to control are more susceptible to cardiovascular disease, kidney damage, eye problems and other complications, including nerve damage (diabetic neuropathy). Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy “High blood sugar is toxic to your nerves,” says  Robert Bolash, MD , a specialist in Cleveland Clinic’s Department of Pain Management. “When a nerve is damaged, you may feel tingling, pins and needles, burning or sharp, stabbing pain.” Diabetic neuropathy typically starts in your toes, feet or ankles and creeps up your body as the condition worsens, he says. However, nerve damage also can affect your hands and wrists as well as your heart, digestive system, sex organs and more. Up to 70 percent of people with diabetes have some kind of neuropathy , reports the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) . “Anyone with diabetes can get nerve damage at any time,” says Dr. Bolash. “It’s most common in people whose blood sugar is poorly controlled and those who have had diabetes a long time.” According to the NIDDK, the highest rates of neuropathy are among people who have had diabetes 25 years or longer. To avoid getting diabetic neuropathy, control your blood sugar, keeping it as close to nondiabetic levels as possible, advises Dr. Bolash. The bad news about diabetic neuropathy is that it’s tough to reverse. It also can cause serious problems, especially in your feet. If you don’t feel blisters, sores or other foot injuries and don’t promptly care for them, you Continue reading >>

Aan Summary Of Evidence-based Guideline For Patients And Their Families

Aan Summary Of Evidence-based Guideline For Patients And Their Families

THERAPIES FOR TREATING DIABETIC NERVE PAIN What is diabetic nerve pain? Diabetic nerve pain is a condition that can develop in people who have diabetes. Diabetes leads to high blood sugar levels. This can lead to nerve damage in about 50 percent of people with diabetes. The damage occurs in the nerve endings in the feet and legs and sometimes in the hands and arms. Blood vessels that carry oxygen to the nerves also can become damaged. This damage can slow down nerve signals to the muscles. It also can cause the nerves to send signals at the wrong times, which can result in pain. Sometimes the nerves stop communicating completely. This can lead to numbness in the feet and hands. People with diabetic nerve pain can develop many symptoms. Some people will have symptoms soon after starting treatment. However, symptoms tend to develop slowly over many years. They often are noticeable several years after diagnosis. These symptoms can disrupt sleep, which can lead to mood changes and lower quality of life. The main symptoms are painful tingling, burning, and numbness. As the condition worsens, weakness can occur in the legs. This may be experienced as feeling “unsteady.†Symptoms often start in the feet and, later, progress to the hands and arms. Other body parts also can be affected. These include the organs that control automatic body processes. Some people develop digestive problems such as nausea (upset stomach), vomiting, constipation, or diarrhea. Other problems include difficulty with bladder control or sexual function. Dizziness can happen when changing positions quickly. About 25 percent of people with diabetes will have pain and numbness from nerve damage. Controlling blood sugar levels can help prevent diabetic nerve pain. I have diabetic nerve pain. My do Continue reading >>

Treatment For Diabetes Nerve Pain

Treatment For Diabetes Nerve Pain

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is the term for nerve pain caused by diabetes. The symptoms can range from tingling to numbness and pain. Treatment for diabetes nerve pain may including tackling the symptoms themselves, as well as making sure diabetes is as well managed as possible. Good blood glucose control is the single most important factor in preventing neuropathy, slowing its progress once you have it, and relieving many symptoms. Over-the-counter pain relievers for diabetes nerve pain Some people find relief for mild diabetes nerve pain on their pharamcist's shelves. Common pain relievers and some topical creams may help, depending on the severity of pain. Anyone with diabetes should talk to their doctor before taking any medication. Even over-the-counter medications can interact with other medications or cause severe side effects in people with diabetes. Here are some over-the-counter pain relief options to consider: NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). These drugs reduce inflammation and relieve pain. NSAIDs available without a prescription include aspirin and ibuprofen. But NSAIDs can cause harmful side effects such as stomach irritation and bleeding in some people if taken for weeks or months. When taken long-term they can also lead to kidney and liver damage, which may be more likely in people with diabetes. Paracetamol and other over-the-counter medicines containing paracetamol relieve diabetes nerve pain without reducing inflammation. These medications do not cause the stomach irritation that NSAIDs do. However, taking more paracetamol than recommended can lead to liver damage. It is important to read labels and check with your pharmacist if you have concerns. Other topical creams. Salicylate is a chemical similar to aspirin, and is found in some Continue reading >>

24 Natural Home Remedies For Neuropathy Pain In Feet And Hands

24 Natural Home Remedies For Neuropathy Pain In Feet And Hands

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition which describes damage to the peripheral nervous system, which transmits information from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. This can result in pain, loss of feeling, and inability to control muscles. As with any other condition, there is no “one size fits all” remedy for those suffering from this malady and treatment may vary depending on the cause and severity. However, many individuals find relief using natural remedies. Here are the top 24 Natural Home Remedies For Neuropathy Pain In Feet And Hands I. Overview Of Neuropathy – Symptoms And Causes: Peripheral neuropathy usually leads to anesthesia and pain in the feet and hands. People often describe the peripheral neuropathy pain like burning or tingling, while they can compare to the numbness feeling when wearing thin gloves. Nerve damage is the main cause of peripheral neuropathy. It may be the result of problems such as trauma, infection, exposure to toxic substances, and metabolic problems. One of the most popular triggers of this disease is diabetes. In many situations, symptoms of peripheral neuropathy can be improved by time – especially if it is caused by a curable underlying disease. In this article, I would like to show my readers in Vkool.com some basic knowledge of this disease as well as home remedies for neuropathy which are safe and simple to apply. Firstly, you will need to look at the causes of the disease. 1. Causes: There are many risk factors which can lead people to suffer from neuropathy disease. It is not always simple to determine the causes of peripheral neuropathy, because of the numerous factors which can cause neuropathy (neuropathies). The triggers contain: – Expose to poisons: This exposure can include a number of toxic subst Continue reading >>

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