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What Is Glucose As An Ingredient?

Glucose | Baking Ingredients | Bakerpedia

Glucose | Baking Ingredients | Bakerpedia

Granulated sugar is not the sole form of sugar used in baking applications. Liquid glucose, or sugar syrup, is used to impart extra moisture and softness to products such as cakes, and also used for ease of handling in icings or frostings. In cakes, sugar syrup is usually added during the creaming stage with sugar and butter. When sugar syrup is utilized in royal icing or frosting, the syrup serves the purpose of preventing hardening and improving viscosity of the frosting. More specifically, sugar gives cookies their crisp texture and assists in spread. In breads or rolls, sugar not only gives flavor but aids in crumb color, grain texture, and volume. Furthermore, all products able to form a crust utilize sugar in a chemical reaction called a Maillard reaction, where proteins and sugars react to enhance crust color and flavor. If too much glucose is consumed at one time, the excess glucose is stored in the liver in the form of glycogen. At times when the level of glucose in the blood stream drops significantly, glycogen is utilized to compensate for the low levels. The major hormone utilized in blood sugar regulation is insulin, released by the pancreas. Improper regulation of glucose leads to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. Individuals with hypoglycemia yield an extremely low volume of glucose in the blood stream caused by overproduction of insulin and is remedied by additional consumption of glucose to compensate. High glucose levels in the blood results in hyperglycemia and must be regulated by the addition of insulin to promote storage or promote metabolism of the excess blood sugar. For healthier options, date sugar, honey, maple sugar, and agave nectar can serve as replacements to sugar. Continue reading >>

Glucose Syrup - Wikipedia

Glucose Syrup - Wikipedia

Glucose syrup, also known as confectioner's glucose, is a syrup made from the hydrolysis of starch . Glucose is a sugar . Maize (corn) is commonly used as the source of the starch in the US, in which case the syrup is called " corn syrup ", but glucose syrup is also made from potatoes and wheat , and less often from barley , rice and cassava . [1] p.21 [2] Glucose syrup containing over 90% glucose is used in industrial fermentation , [3] but syrups used in confectionery contain varying amounts of glucose , maltose and higher oligosaccharides , depending on the grade, and can typically contain 10% to 43% glucose. [4] Glucose syrup is used in foods to sweeten, soften texture and add volume. By converting some of the glucose in corn syrup into fructose (using an enzymatic process), a sweeter product, high fructose corn syrup can be produced. Depending on the method used to hydrolyse the starch and on the extent to which the hydrolysis reaction has been allowed to proceed, different grades of glucose syrup are produced, which have different characteristics and uses. The syrups are broadly categorised according to their dextrose equivalent (DE). The further the hydrolysis process proceeds, the more reducing sugars are produced, and the higher the DE. Depending on the process used, glucose syrups with different compositions, and hence different technical properties, can have the same DE. The original glucose syrups were manufactured by acid hydrolysis of corn starch at high temperature and pressure. The typical product had a DE of 42, but quality was variable due to the difficulty of controlling the reaction. Higher DE syrups made by acid hydrolysis tend to have a bitter taste and a dark colour, due to the production of hydroxymethylfurfural and other byproducts. [1] p.26 Th Continue reading >>

Glucose Syrups: Technology And Applications

Glucose Syrups: Technology And Applications

General & Introductory Food Science & Technology Glucose Syrups: Technology and Applications Glucose Syrups: Technology and Applications Glucose syrups (commonly known as corn syrups in North America) are derived from starch sources such as maize, wheat and potatoes. Offering alternative functional properties to sugar as well as economic benefits, glucose syrups are extremely versatile sweeteners, and are widely used in food manufacturing and other industries. They are a key ingredient in confectionery products, beer, soft drinks, sports drinks, jams, sauces and ice creams, as well as in pharmaceuticals and industrial fermentations. This book brings together all the relevant information on the manufacture and use of glucose syrups. Drawing on forty years experience in the international glucose industry, the author provides a valuable reference for all those involved in the processing and buying of these syrups, and for scientists involved in the manufacture of a full range of food (and some non-food) products in which the syrups are ingredients. The emphasis is on practical information - recipes are included where relevant in the applications chapters, and appendices offer commonly-used calculations and useful data. Food technologists can use the book to make choices about the most suitable glucose syrup to use in a particular application, and also to adapt recipes in order to replace sugar (sucrose) or other ingredients. A glossary of terms reflecting the international terminology of the industry completes the book. This item:Glucose Syrups: Technology and Applications Continue reading >>

Food Labels: How To Spot Hidden Sugars

Food Labels: How To Spot Hidden Sugars

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. 01/18/2011 08:28 am ETUpdatedMay 25, 2011 Try finding out how much sugar has really been added to your yogurt, cereal, bread or energy bar, and watch the hours fly by! Although the FDA (and the USDA ) has certainly acknowledged and tried to define the term "added sugars," or those sugars that aren't naturally occurring in foods (for example, fruits), the government is leaving it up to us to be food detectives and learn all the various names for sugar and, more importantly, how much of it we're actually putting in our mouths. Sugar masquerades under a variety of guises, such as dextrose, fructose, fruit juice concentrates, glucose, invert sugar and maltose, but trying to figure out what percentage of calories these sugars represent in a packaged food product is akin to scoring a concert ticket to Lady Gaga -- it's pretty much impossible. That's because the FDA has refused to add an "Added Sugars" line (in grams) within the "Sugars" section on the nutrition facts label. Instead, added sugars are only mentioned in the ingredient list -- and only in decreasing weight order , not by percentage of calories. Realizing this loophole, some food companies seem to be taking some extreme liberties. Not only are they using some of those tricky sugar synonyms in the ingredient list, but they're also using several of them, in a single product. Added sugars are added sugars. No matter what you call them, they do pretty much the same thing to food (make it taste sweeter). So by dividing the total amount of added sugars into three or four different sugar names instead of using just one type of sugar, companies are able drop their added sugars further down the list (the less the weight, the lower the rank on Continue reading >>

Ingredients -- Sugars

Ingredients -- Sugars

Sugars are used as sweeteners, as thickeners, and as structural elements in foods. Table sugar is sucrose. It is made from two simpler sugars called glucose and fructose. Glucose is sometimes called dextrose. Glucose is a little less sweet than sucrose, and fructose is a sweeter than sucrose. When sucrose is heated in the presence of an acid (such as vinegar or lemon juice), it breaks down into glucose and fructose, and the resulting syrup is sweeter than sucrose. The syrup is called "invert sugar". Simple sugars can join to form long chains. Glucose units can chain up to form amylose, the molecule that forms the structure of plants. Amylose can be broken down into its simple glucose units using enzymes. The result is called "corn syrup". Processing it some more using enzymes that convert glucose into fructose, yields "high fructose corn syrup". The mixture of glucose and fructose is similar to that in sucrose and invert sugar, and it is sweeter than plain corn syrup. There are many different types of simple sugars, and they can combine into many more types of complex sugars. The backbone of DNA is a chain made of sugars. Continue reading >>

What Is Glucose Syrup?

What Is Glucose Syrup?

Jill Corleone is a registered dietitian and health coach who has been writing and lecturing on diet and health for more than 15 years. Her work has been featured on the Huffington Post, Diabetes Self-Management and in the book "Noninvasive Mechanical Ventilation," edited by John R. Bach, M.D. Corleone holds a Bachelor of Science in nutrition. Glucose syrup may be used to make your favorite beer.Photo Credit: Rayes/Digital Vision/Getty Images While glucose is the fuel for your body, consuming it in syrup form isn't going to boost your energy levels. Like other forms of sugar, glucose syrup is simply an added sweetener. It's OK to include small amounts of food that contain glucose syrup in your diet, but too much may lead to weight gain. Glucose is a monosaccharide, which means it is a single molecule and often referred to as a simple sugar. Glucose is found naturally in fruits and honey, and it's also found in processed foods. Glucose syrup is created by hydrolyzing, or breaking apart, the strings of glucose molecules that make up starchy foods. Glucose syrup is most commonly made from cornstarch, but wheat, potatoes and rice are also used to make the sweetener. Glucose syrup may be fat-free, but it's a concentrated source of calories and offers very little nutritional value. A 1-tablespoon serving contains 62 calories and 17 grams of carbohydrates, all in the form of sugar. Glucose syrup made from corn contains a small amount of calcium, zinc and thiamine but not a significant amount. For comparison, 1 tablespoon of granulated sugar contains 50 calories and 13 grams of carbohydrates in the form of sugar and an insignificant amount of iron and riboflavin. Glucose syrup is a liquid sweetener that is well-tolerated and very versatile. It's often used in commercial canned Continue reading >>

What's In The Glucose Drink? Here's What The Ingredients Look Like

What's In The Glucose Drink? Here's What The Ingredients Look Like

What's In The Glucose Drink? Here's What The Ingredients Look Like I'll be the first to admit I hate the glucose test. For more reasons than just that absolutely nasty taste. It's a time consuming test, and because you have to take it fasting, it's miserable especially if you suffer from morning sickness. Chugging that drink on an empty stomach is one of the more disgusting things you do at your OB-GYN's office, and that's saying something considering the fact you pee in a cup every time you're there. So, what's in the glucose drink that makes it so disgusting and also controversial? And why are more and more women declining the beverage? While there are dozens of these drinks on the market, the pricey sugar beverages are essentially a mix of sugar and water , noted a popular supplier's website. In this case, it's a combination of about 75 grams of glucose with citric acid, water, some flavorings, and a minuscule amount of sodium benzoate and sodium hexametaphosphate as preservatives. Why is it so controversial? Like anything, the internet has found itself in a frenzy because a blogger referred to the drink as toxic . She claimed that the use of the scary sounding brominated vegetable oil (BVO) that appears in some, but not all, of the glucose test drinks poses a particular risk to the mother and developing fetus. While there is likely some truth to the risk of brominated oils, not all of the drinks contain this chemical, and if they do, it is in minute amounts. But, as the Mayo Clinic noted, it's generally considered safe in small amounts , but that doesn't mean women aren't worried about it. Why wouldn't they be? This concern has changed the products many doctors are choosing. I called several providers' offices in New York City to conduct a highly unofficial poll, a Continue reading >>

What Is Liquid Glucose?

What Is Liquid Glucose?

Two days ago, I was making ganache as a topping for cupcakes. I needed, as expected, cream and chocolate. But '1 teaspoon of liquid glucose' was also on the list of ingredients (for 12 cupcakes). I didn't think I had that, so I used 'fondant sugar' (powder sugar with a bit of water, described here as poured fondant). Is liquid glucose something specific you can buy in stores, or is it a collection name for all kinds of sweet, liquid stuff (honey, syrup, fondant etc.)? If it's something specific, can you make it at home as well? And yet another question: if I would have added (powdered) sugar to my cream, would I have accomplished ganache as well (after being poured over chocolate), since I think the sugar would dissolve in the cream? (Just to be complete: my ganache was fine.) First of all- glucose is a different sugar than table sugar. Corn syrup in the US is similar but has a few extra compounds. As far as I can tell it is used for similar reasons as liquid glucose in the EU. when making candy a little corn syrup can be added to the sugar solution to prevent crystallization. in the US at least, it is much cheaper than cane sugar. You can buy it in stores here- I can't say whether you can in Belgium. I have, on occasion, been forced to use a very thick sugar syrup in place of corn syrup. The recipe used the syrup for reason #1 above and turned out well. If it had been in there for reason #2 it would have been less successful. In general, if you can find it, it is probably better to buy than to make a substitute because of reason #3. Arabic gum is actually a real thing, and an ingredient that would not be in liquid glucose. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gum_arabic ...and... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose_syrup Jolenealaska Jan 11 '14 at 5:49 I believe you're actually describing Continue reading >>

Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need To Worry About

Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need To Worry About

> Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need to Worry About Top 10 Ingredients You Really Dont Need to Worry About Lets face it, the gluten-free diet is complex and difficult to maneuver. Add to this the issue of common ingredients thatnever seem to get off lengthy lists of things to question and its no wonder that so many people doing their best to avoid gluten are still assailed by confusion and anxiety. Thats why we think it sometimes makes more sense to explain why you dont have to worry about certain ingredients.Here are the leading ingredients that you can stop worrying about. Why its on worry lists in the first place: The Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) says caramel color can be made from malt syrup or starch hydrolysates, either of which could contain gluten. Why you dont need to worry: Despite what the CFR says, companies typically use corn to produce caramel color, rather than wheat. Underthe Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act, a products label must indicate if wheat is used in caramel coloring. Why thats a good thing: Caramel color is in a lot of products, including carbonated and alcoholic beverages, baked goods and sauces. Why its on worry lists in the first place:While citric acid is usually made from corn, beet sugar or molasses, it can also be made from wheat. Why you dont have to worry: Citric acid is highly processed and purified. The steps that bring it to this point fully remove any gluten proteins. Why thats a good thing: Its one less ingredient to worry about and its a fairly common ingredient used in products such as canned goods and soft drinks. Why its on worry lists in the first place: Dextrose can be made from wheat. In fact, sometimes it is. Why you dont have to worry: Like citric acid, dextrose is a highly processed ingredien Continue reading >>

High Fructose Corn Syrup Questions And Answers

High Fructose Corn Syrup Questions And Answers

High Fructose Corn Syrup Questions and Answers Consumer Info About Additives & Ingredients Main Page FDA receives many inquiries and comments from the public about the chemistry of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in relation to other sweeteners such as table sugar and honey, and whether HFCS is safe to eat. HFCS is derived from corn starch. Starch itself is a chain of glucose (a simple sugar) molecules joined together. When corn starch is broken down into individual glucose molecules, the end product is corn syrup, which is essentially 100% glucose. To make HFCS, enzymes are added to corn syrup in order to convert some of the glucose to another simple sugar called fructose, also called fruit sugar because it occurs naturally in fruits and berries. HFCS is high in fructose compared to the pure glucose that is in corn syrup. Different formulations of HFCS contain different amounts of fructose. The most common forms of HFCS contain either 42 percent or 55 percent fructose, as described in the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR 184.1866), and these are referred to in the industry as HFCS 42 and HFCS 55. The rest of the HFCS is glucose and water. HFCS 42 is mainly used in processed foods, cereals, baked goods, and some beverages. HFCS 55 is used primarily in soft drinks. Sucrose (sugar), the most well-known sweetener, is made by crystallizing sugar cane or beet juice. Sucrose is also made up of the same two simple sugars, glucose and fructose, joined together to form a single molecule containing one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule, an exact one-to-one ratio. The proportion of fructose to glucose in both HFCS 42 and HFCS 55 is similar to that of sucrose. The primary differences between sucrose and the common forms of HFCS are: In sucrose, a chemical bond joins th Continue reading >>

Food-based Ingredients To Modulate Blood Glucose.

Food-based Ingredients To Modulate Blood Glucose.

Food-based ingredients to modulate blood glucose. Functional Food Centre, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom. [email protected] Maintenance of normal blood glucose levels is important for avoiding chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular problems, and obesity. Type 2 diabetes is one of the major health problems affecting the world population and this condition can be exacerbated by poor diet, low physical activity, and genetic abnormalities. Food plays an important role in the management of blood glucose and associated complications in diabetes. This is attributed to the ability of food-based ingredients to modulate blood glucose without causing any adverse health consequences. This chapter focuses on four important food groups such as cereals, legumes, fruits, and spices that have active ingredients such as soluble dietary fiber, polyphenols, and antinutrients with the ability to reduce glycemic and insulin response in humans. Other food ingredients such as simple sugars, sugar alcohols, and some proteins are also discussed in moderation. Continue reading >>

What Is Glucose-fructose Syrup? (q&a)

What Is Glucose-fructose Syrup? (q&a)

Carbohydrates | Sugars | 05 April 2018 Glucose-fructose syrup is a sweetening ingredient widely used in a variety of food products. Read our Q&As for more information about it, how it is made and its impact on our health. Glucose is a simple sugar, a so-called monosaccharide, because it is made up of just one sugar unit. It is found naturally in many foods, and it is used by our bodies as a source of energy to carry out daily activities. Fructose is also a simple sugar, often referred to as a fruit sugar. Fructose, as the name suggest, is found in fruits (such as oranges and apples), berries, some root vegetables(such as beets, sweet potatoes, parsnips, and onions) and honey. Fructose is the sweetest of all naturally occurring sugars. Glucose and fructose bound together in equal amounts create another type of sugar sucrose a disaccharide commonly known as table sugar. GFS is a sweet liquid made of glucose and fructose. Unlike sucrose, where 50% of glucose and 50% of fructose are linked together, GFS can have a varying ratio of the two simple sugars, meaning that some extra, unbound glucose or fructose molecules are present. The fructose content in GFS can range from 5% to over 50%. GFS is typically made from starch. The source of starch depends on the local availability of the raw product used for extraction. Historically, maize was a preferred choice, while in recent years wheat became a popular source for the GFS production. Starch is a chain of glucose molecules, and the first step in GFS production involves freeing those glucose units. The linked glucose molecules in starch are cut down (hydrolysed) into free glucose molecules. Then, with the use of enzymes, some of the glucose is changed into fructose in a process called isomerisation. Check our infographic on how Continue reading >>

Glucose/dextrose Understanding Ingredients For The Canadian Baker

Glucose/dextrose Understanding Ingredients For The Canadian Baker

The sugar known as glucose has two origins: In a processed form from corn (corn syrup) In baking, we usually refer to industrially made glucose. It is made from corn and the resulting product, a thick syrup, is then adjusted to a uniform viscosity or consistency. The particular form of the syrup is defined by what is known as the dextrose equivalent, or DE for short. Corn syrup is the most familiar form of glucose. In plant baking, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is the major sweetening agent in bread and buns. It consists of roughly half fructose and half dextrose. Dextrose (chemically identical to glucose) is available in crystalline form and has certain advantages over sucrose: It contributes to browning in bread and bun making. In crystalline form, it is often used in doughnut sugars as it is more inclined to stay dry and non-greasy. It is hygroscopic and valued as a moisture-retaining ingredient. It retards crystallization in syrups, candies, and fondant. Corn syrup is made from the starch of maize (corn) and contains varying amounts of glucose and maltose, depending on the processing methods. Corn syrup is used in foods to soften texture, add volume, prevent crystallization of sugar, and enhance flavour. Table 3, above, showed that glucose/dextrose has a sweetening level of approximately three-quarters that of sugar. Table 4 shows the amount of corn syrup or HFCS needed to replace sugar in a formula. Continue reading >>

Food Labelling - Making Sense Of Sugar

Food Labelling - Making Sense Of Sugar

Today all manufacturers need to provide nutritional information on all pre-packaged foods and drinks found in the UK. Youll find this information on the food label either on the front or back of pack, to help you understand the nutrient and calorie count. When it comes to sugars in particular, below youll find lots of useful information about where you can find out just how much sugars are in a product by taking a closer look at the different food labels. We often get asked as well about added sugars which are those sugars used during manufacturing, and whether its possible to figure out how much is in our food. Unfortunately you wont be able to find added sugars listed separately on a food label its not possible for a manufacturer to accurately analyse the amount of added sugars in a food or drink product. The key reason for this is that you may find that during the manufacturing process that the sugars are converted into another ingredient. To give you an example, when you make beer the sugars (glucose and maltose) from the malt are fermented to make alcohol which isnt actually a sugar. What you may find as well, is that the sugars combine with other ingredients to enhance the flavour and/or colour of a product making it very difficult to determine where the sugars come from (i.e. have they been added? Do they occur naturally? Or have they been combined in the cooking process?). The first place youll be able to find out whether a product contains sugars is in the ingredients list. All the ingredients that have been used to make the product will be shown in order of weight. If you see sugar listed then it is the same type of sugar that you find in your kitchen cupboard (sucrose). There may also be other ingredients that contain sugars such as fruit, fruit juice or oth Continue reading >>

Glucose || Skin Deep Cosmetics Database | Ewg

Glucose || Skin Deep Cosmetics Database | Ewg

Show all 144 recent products that contain GLUCOSE. EWG provides information on personal care product ingredients from the published scientific literature, to supplement incomplete data available from companies and the government. The ratings below indicate the relative level of concern posed by exposure to the ingredients in this product - not the product itself - compared to other product formulations. The ratings reflect potential health hazards but do not account for the level of exposure or individual susceptibility, factors which determine actual health risks, if any. Learn more | Legal Disclaimer Beyond providing Skin Deep as an educational tool for consumers, EWG offers its EWG VERIFIED mark as a quick and easily identifiable way of conveying personal care products that meet EWG's strict health criteria. Before a company can use EWG VERIFIEDTM on such products, the company must show that it fully discloses the products' ingredients on their labels or packaging, they do not contain EWG ingredients of concern, and are made with good manufacturing practices, among other criteria. Note that EWG receives licensing fees from all EWG VERIFIED member companies that help to support the important work we do. Learn more | Legal Disclaimer HEADQUARTERS 1436 U Street. NW, Suite 100 | Washington, DC 20009 | (202) 667-6982 CALIFORNIA OFFICE 500 Washington St., Suite 400 | San Francisco, CA 94111 MIDWEST OFFICE 111 3rd Avenue South, Suite 240 | Minneapolis, MN 55401 SACRAMENTO OFFICE 910 K Street, Suite 340 | Sacramento, CA 95814 Copyright 2007-2018, EWG .All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy | Legal Disclaimer Continue reading >>

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