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What Is Drug Induced Diabetes?

8 Drug-induced Diabetes

8 Drug-induced Diabetes

Volume 6, Issue 4 , October 1992, Pages 849-866 Author links open overlay panel R.E.Ferner Get rights and content The only drugs which commonly cause diabetes during therapeutic use are the anti-hypertensive vasodilator diazoxide, and corticosteroids in high doses such as those used to palliate intracranial tumours. Thiazide diuretics have in the past been used in higher doses than necessary to treat hypertension, and the lower doses now used probably carry only a slight risk of inducing diabetes. The risk from -blockers is also quite small, but there is some evidence that thiazides combined with -blockers may be more likely to cause diabetes than either drug alone. The combination is probably best avoided in patients with a family history of non-insulin-dependent diabetes. The effect of the low-oestrogen combined oral contraceptive pill seems to be slight, and it presents a risk only to women who have had gestational diabetes. Bodybuilders who take enormous doses of anabolic-androgens can develop impaired glucose tolerance. Several drugs, including theophylline, aspirin, isoniazid and nalidixic acid can cause transient hyperglycaemia in overdosage, but only streptozotocin, alloxan and the rodenticide Vacor are likely to cause permanent diabetes. Continue reading >>

Drug Induced Diabetes...

Drug Induced Diabetes...

I have been having high blood sugar elvels off late... one day the reading was 190 fasting and pp was 265 I was refferd to endocrinologist..and he started with diabetes meds,.....I'm not sure just one reading was high, rest Readings were high but within limits....has anybody been facing similar issues, as the neph says its drug induced diabetes.. due to steroids or tacrolimus...please share... I was suspected of having MCD but the biopsy was inconclusive but my neph forged ahead with high dose prednisolone. I was on 75 mg daily for nearly eighteen months with some extra monthe for taper. I had changed from nephrologist to rheumatologist because when I came off pred I had a massive flare of psoriatic arthritis. I also found that my blood glucose levels had gone up dramatically. My gp said that it happens with steroids and he said I had type two diabetes . I have been taking 1000 mg of metformin (diabex) daily ever since . My diabetes is well controlled. High blood sugar can be a definite side effect of prednisone. I don't believe it is a concern from tacrolimus. It seems inappropriate to begin treating your high blood sugar unless it has been monitored and tested more than once. My daughters blood sugar tested high a few times but a 2 hour glucose test indicated she is okay and not in need of medication. She is also on prednisone. She was given a blood glucose tester to test her own blood sugar randomly at home. Since steroid diabetes came evolve rapidly it is something you should monitor. Note however that most diabetes brought on by the steroids subsides when the steroids use is discontinued. Hope this helps. Perhaps you should get a tester for home. Many drug stores offer these free of charge if your doctor provides a prescription. I also experience high blood sugar Continue reading >>

Medication-induced Diabetes Mellitus

Medication-induced Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract Epidemiological studies and case reports have demonstrated an increased rate of development of diabetes mellitus consequent to taking diverse types of medication. This review explores this evidence linking these medications and development of diabetes and presents postulated mechanisms by which the medications might cause diabetes. Some medications are associated with a reduction in insulin production, some with reduction in insulin sensitivity, and some appear to be associated with both reduction in insulin production and insulin sensitivity. 1 INTRODUCTION A variety of medications have been associated with development of diabetes. Establishing a precise cause and effect relationship between a medication and development of diabetes is challenging for several reasons. Side effects of most medications are rare and clinical studies of medications typically evaluate effectiveness and are not powered to evaluate side effects. Diabetes is a common disease and there is always a question of whether it would have developed if the person had not taken the medication in question. Patients are often taking multiple medications and so it is hard to determine which medication was responsible for the side effect. For example, organ transplant patients may be taking a glucocorticoid and a calcineurin inhibitor, so an epidemiological study has difficulty ascribing the side effect to one or the other or the combination of these medications. There are also covariants such as the weight gain associated with steroids or antipsychotics making it difficult to know if development of diabetes was a primary or secondary effect of the medication. When we turn to deciphering the mechanism by which a medication caused diabetes, there are often multiple plausible molecular mechanisms ident Continue reading >>

Immunosuppressive Drug-induced Diabetes - Em|consulte

Immunosuppressive Drug-induced Diabetes - Em|consulte

[1]Service dEndocrinologie-Mtabolisme et Diabtologie-Nutrition, Hpital Jean Minjoz, CHU de Besanon, F-25030 Besanon Cedex (France) [2]Service dEndocrinologie-Mtabolisme et Diabtologie-Nutrition, Hpital Jean Minjoz, CHU de Besanon, 25030 Besanon Cedex (France) Diabte induit par les immunosuppresseurs Le diabte post-transplantation (DPT) est un des principaux effets secondaires des immunosuppresseurs. Avec laugmentation de la survie des receveurs dorganes, les complications du diabte sont devenues un problme majeur. Laction diabtogne principale des corticodes passe par laggravation de linsulinorsistance, mais plusieurs tudes ont rapport des effets dltres sur la scrtion dinsuline et sur la cellule pancratique. Les inhibiteurs de la calcineurine peuvent induire un DPT par plusieurs mcanismes, principalement en diminuant la scrtion dinsuline et par un effet toxique direct sur la cellule . Des tudes in vitro rcentes ont montr une augmentation de lapoptose des cellules, soumises aux inhibiteurs de la calcineurine. Dans de rares tudes qui impliquent dautres immunosuppresseurs [mycophnolate moftil (MMF), sirolimus] les rsultats apparaissent contradictoires, le daclizumab semble, quant lui, ne prsenter aucun effet dltre. Les tudes cliniques saccordent, cependant, dmontrer le fort potentiel du tacrolimus induire un DPT en comparaison la ciclosporine. La rduction de lincidence du DPT est possible et repose sur lutilisation de schmas dimmunosuppression sans glucocorticodes et/ou avec de faibles doses de tacrolimus. Chez les patients dveloppant un DPT, la substitution du tacrolimus par la ciclosporine est susceptible damliorer ou de corriger les anomalies du mtabolisme glucidique. En labsence dtudes spcifiques ralises dans ce domaine, la prise en charge du DPT est semblable celle du Continue reading >>

Drug Or Chemical Induced Diabetes Mellitus W/o Complications

Drug Or Chemical Induced Diabetes Mellitus W/o Complications

ICD-10: E09.9 Short Description: Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus w/o complications Long Description: Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus without complications This is the 2018 version of the ICD-10-CM diagnosis code E09.9 Valid for Submission The code E09.9 is valid for submission for HIPAA-covered transactions. Code Classification Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases (E00–E90) Diabetes mellitus (E08-E13) Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus (E09) Convert to ICD-9 Synonyms Diabetes mellitus caused by drug without complication Diabetes mellitus caused by non-steroid drugs Diabetes mellitus caused by non-steroid drugs without complication Drug-induced diabetes mellitus Drug-induced diabetes mellitus Steroid-induced diabetes Steroid-induced diabetes mellitus without complication Diabetes Also called: DM, Diabetes mellitus Diabetes is a disease in which your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Insulin is a hormone that helps the glucose get into your cells to give them energy. With type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Without enough insulin, the glucose stays in your blood. You can also have prediabetes. This means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Having prediabetes puts you at a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause serious problems. It can damage your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Diabetes can also cause heart disease, stroke and even the need to remove a limb. Pregnant women can also get diabetes, called gestational diabetes. Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One t Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Diabetes

Drug-induced Diabetes

DIABETES is a well-known disease these days. It occurs when the sugar or glucose levels rise inside the human body. This rise in blood sugar levels takes place due to abnormal functioning of the cells known as β-cells of pancreas. Under normal conditions, these cells release insulin on requirement to transfer glucose from blood to the tissues/cells for energy. This transfer balances blood sugar levels. The misconduct of these β-cells disturbs the balance of blood sugar levels and causes diabetes. The activity of β-cells can be disturbed due to many reasons. One of those reasons is the consumption of some therapeutic agents. THERAPEUTIC AGENTS can influence the development of diabetes, especially when pre-existing risk factors are present and these may cause glucose control to deteriorate if administered to those with existing diabetes. It has been found that drug-induced diabetes can develop at the age of 20 years but it is more prone at the age between 40-60 years. The chances of development of drug-induced diabetes are found to be more in females (70%) as compared to males (30%). ACTION OF DRUGS INDUCING DIABETES Therapeutic agents causing diabetes may act either by increasing insulin resistance or by affecting the secretion of insulin or both. Drugs that cause diabetes by interfering with insulin production & secretion are: β-receptor antagonist (used in hypoglycemia) Tacrolimus (immunosuppressant used in organ transplant) Priminil (Vacor) (used as rodenticide) Didanosine (used as anti-retroviral therapy) Pentamidine (antimicrobial medication in used in pneumonia) L-asparaginase (as anti-cancer agent) Diphenylhydantoin (used as anticonvulsant or antilepptic drug) Opiates (used as pain reliever) Drugs that cause diabetes by developing insulin resistance: Glucocort Continue reading >>

Frontiers | Molecular Mechanisms Of Antipsychotic Drug-induced Diabetes | Neuroscience

Frontiers | Molecular Mechanisms Of Antipsychotic Drug-induced Diabetes | Neuroscience

Front. Neurosci., 21 November 2017 | Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Diabetes 1School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia 2School of Medicine, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia 3Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Wollongong, NSW, Australia 4Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, GeneCology Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, QLD, Australia Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are widely prescribed to control various mental disorders. As mental disorders are chronic diseases, these drugs are often used over a life-time. However, APDs can cause serious glucometabolic side-effects including type 2 diabetes and hyperglycaemic emergency, leading to medication non-compliance. At present, there is no effective approach to overcome these side-effects. Understanding the mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes should be helpful in prevention and treatment of these side-effects of APDs and thus improve the clinical outcomes of APDs. In this review, the potential mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes are summarized so that novel approaches can be considered to relieve APD-induced diabetes. APD-induced diabetes could be mediated by multiple mechanisms: (1) APDs can inhibit the insulin signaling pathway in the target cells such as muscle cells, hepatocytes and adipocytes to cause insulin resistance; (2) APD-induced obesity can result in high levels of free fatty acids (FFA) and inflammation, which can also cause insulin resistance. (3) APDs can cause direct damage to -cells, leading to dysfunction and apoptosis of -cells. A recent theory considers that both -cell damage and insulin resistance are necessary factors for the development of diabetes. In high-fat di Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Diabetes

Drug-induced Diabetes

Many therapeutic agents can predispose to or precipitate diabetes, especially when pre-existing risk factors are present, and these may cause glucose control to deteriorate if administered to those with existing diabetes. They may act by increasing insulin resistance, by affecting the secretion of insulin, or both. For convenience, these agents may be subdivided into widely used medications that are weakly diabetogenic, and drugs used for special indications that are more strongly diabetogenic. Examples of the former include antihypertensive agents and statins, and examples of the latter include steroids, antipsychotics and a range of immunosuppressive agents. There are also a number of known beta cell poisons including the insecticide Vacor, alloxan and streptozotocin. Introduction A wide range of therapeutic agents may affect glucose tolerance, and the list of known or suspected drugs is lengthy. This entry summarizes evidence concerning the agents most frequently implicated. Widely used medications A number of drugs used to reduce cardiovascular risk also predispose to the development of diabetes. These include the thiazide diuretics, beta-blockers and statins. It should however be appreciated that these are commonly offered to individuals who are at increased risk of diabetes by virtue of risk factors such as obesity and hypertension, and that risk association does not necessarily mean causation. Thiazides: Thiazide diuretics revolutionized the treatment of hypertension in the 1960s, but were soon noted to increase the risk of diabetes[1]. Subsequent experience showed that that this risk is greatly reduced by low-dose therapy, whose benefits therefore outweigh its risks. The thiazides have a weak inhibitory effect upon release of insulin from the beta cell. This eff Continue reading >>

Is Drug Induced Diabetes Reversable?

Is Drug Induced Diabetes Reversable?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I am new to the forum. I was diagnosed with Diabetes Type II several weeks ago and have some questions that I can't seem to get answered from researching myself and my doctor give me conflicting information. I'd appreciate any help. A year ago, I had a A1C of 6.2 and was told that I was insulin resistant but did not get a diagnosis of diabetes...The doctor just said, You are insulin resistant, get this book called Sugar busters and that was it. I should have asked more questions now I think about it, but I didn't. This year was probably the most stressful of my life. I divorced, had to sell my home of 13 years because I was layed off, my father died, I moved into an apt, my daughter had migraine problems, then she got mono....I got pneumonia in one lung, was put on prednisone for four days, clarithromycin, and continued to take a drug called norethindrone which I have been on for going on four months now because of irregular bleeding every two weeks and endometriosis like symptoms. I also have PCOS, Polycystic ovarian syndrome. When in the hospital for pneumonia, the nurse pricked my finger and I had a blood sugar reading of 312. I told her that I had just eaten 2 jelly donuts a half-hour ago but she said that didn't matter. The ER doctor told me I had diabetes and wrote a RX for metformin on the spot, asking me to follow-up with my primary for a blood glucose test. An A1C, now showed 6.9. The night before the blood glucose test, I was depressed and ate a whole pound of ground beef. with taco seasoning, and some taco shells. 10 hours of fasting later, my blood glucose reading turned out to be Continue reading >>

Steroid/drug-induced Hyperglycemia

Steroid/drug-induced Hyperglycemia

OVERVIEW: What every practitioner needs to know Drug-induced hyperglycemia is a more common complication of various treatment regimens than many physicians may realize. - Glucocorticoid (GC) or steroid-induced hyperglycemia has been well described in rheumatology, oncology and transplant literature for several decades. GC-induced hyperglycemia is the most common form of drug-induced hyperglycemia. GC treatment routes include oral, IV, intranasal, inhaled, topical, and localized injections. While all forms of GC administration carry the risk of diabetes, the oral and IV routes are by far the most commonly associated with hyperglycemia and will thus be the only treatment routes described in this chapter. GCs may be the most diabetogenic of all drugs known to induce hyperglycemia. - L-Asparaginase induced hyperglycemia has also been well known to complicate acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) induction therapy, particularly in children. - Tacrolimusand cyclosporine (calcineurin inhibitors - CNI) are also diabetogenic. In transplant patients, tacrolimus is more likely to result in hyperglycemia, especially in pediatric transplant recipients and African Americans, and is estimated to be 5 times as diabetogenic as cyclosporine. - In both transplant and oncology patients, GCs, in addition to either L-asparaginase or tacrolimus, has resulted in significantly higher rates of hyperglycemia than seen with any of the agents alone. Because diabetes in transplant patients is unlikely to be due to one factor, the condition has been given a new name, NODAT (New Onset Diabetes After Transplant). - More recently, hyperglycemia has been shown to be associated with a typical or second generation antipsychotic (SGA) use, particularly in conjunction with weight gain. The risk of hyperglycemia Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Glucose Alterations Part 2: Drug-induced Hyperglycemia

Drug-induced Glucose Alterations Part 2: Drug-induced Hyperglycemia

A variety of pharmacological agents A variety of pharmacological agents affect glucose homeostasis resulting in either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Hormones such as insulin, glucagon, catecholamines, growth hormone, and cortisol, among others, contribute to normoglycemia. Drug-induced serum glucose alterations manifested as hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia can have perpetual effects on the body, particularly in patients with diabetes. This article is the second of a two-part series reviewing drug-induced serum glucose alterations. The first article in the series appeared in the previous issue of this journal (Diabetes Spectrum 24:171-177, 2011). In this article, we review select therapies commonly contributing to the development of hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia is clinically defined as a serum glucose level > 180 mg/dl that persists for more than 2 hours. Unlike hypoglycemia, acute hyperglycemia is often benign and may persist without any clinically significant signs or symptoms; however the development of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) are hyperglycemic emergencies. Often signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia manifest when serum glucose levels are in the range of 270–360 mg/dl for an extended period and include the classical symptoms of polyphagia, polydipsia, and polyuria (Table 1). Untreated hyperglycemia, when accompanied with excretion of ketones in urine (DKA), is a medical emergency more common in people with type 1 diabetes. It results in the following symptoms: fatigue, weakness, fruity odor of the breath, confusion, lack of concentration, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting, dry skin, and flushing of the skin. People with type 2 diabetes are more likely to develop HHS, formerly known as hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic c Continue reading >>

Molecular Mechanisms Of Antipsychotic Drug-induced Diabetes

Molecular Mechanisms Of Antipsychotic Drug-induced Diabetes

Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Diabetes Chen, Jiezhong, Huang, Xu-Feng, Shao, Renfu, Chen, Chen and Deng, Chao (2017) Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Diabetes. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 11 NOV: 643. doi:10.3389/fnins.2017.00643 Molecular Mechanisms of Antipsychotic Drug-Induced Diabetes Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) are widely prescribed to control various mental disorders. As mental disorders are chronic diseases, these drugs are often used over a life-time. However, APDs can cause serious glucometabolic side-effects including type 2 diabetes and hyperglycaemic emergency, leading to medication non-compliance. At present, there is no effective approach to overcome these side-effects. Understanding the mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes should be helpful in prevention and treatment of these side-effects of APDs and thus improve the clinical outcomes of APDs. In this review, the potential mechanisms for APD-induced diabetes are summarized so that novel approaches can be considered to relieve APD-induced diabetes. APD-induced diabetes could be mediated by multiple mechanisms: (1) APDs can inhibit the insulin signaling pathway in the target cells such as muscle cells, hepatocytes and adipocytes to cause insulin resistance; (2) APD-induced obesity can result in high levels of free fatty acids (FFA) and inflammation, which can also cause insulin resistance. (3) APDs can cause direct damage to beta-cells, leading to dysfunction and apoptosis of beta-cells. A recent theory considers that both beta-cell damage and insulin resistance are necessary factors for the development of diabetes. In high-fat diet-induced diabetes, the compensatory ability of beta-cells is gradually d Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Diabetes Mellitus.

Drug-induced Diabetes Mellitus.

1. Expert Opin Drug Saf. 2005 Nov;4(6):1097-109. Izzedine H(1), Launay-Vacher V, Deybach C, Bourry E, Barrou B, Deray G. (1)Department of Nephrology, Pitie-SalPetriere Hospital, Paris, France. [email protected] AIMS: To review the medications that influence glucose metabolism with a focus onhypertensive, transplant and HIV-infected patient populations.METHODS: Literature obtained from a MEDLINE search from 1970 to present,including studies published in the English language. The search strategy linkeddrugs, hyperglycaemia and diabetes mellitus, HIV, transplantation, hypertensionand psychiatric patients.RESULTS: Many common therapeutic agents influence glucose metabolism. Multiplemechanisms of action on glucose metabolism exist through pancreatic, hepatic and peripheral effects. The prevalence of hyperglycaemia was higher with the use ofthiazide diuretic, beta-blocker, calcineurin, protease inhibitors and atypicalantipsychotic drugs.CONCLUSIONS: Patients treated with those drugs appear to be at increased risk fordeveloping diabetes. It is prudent to monitor plasma glucose values when it isnot possible to avoid prescription of medication with known effects oncarbohydrate metabolism. Continue reading >>

Drug Or Chemical Induced Diabetes Mellitus With Hyperglycemia

Drug Or Chemical Induced Diabetes Mellitus With Hyperglycemia

E09.65 is a billable/specific ICD-10-CM code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis for reimbursement purposes. Short description: Drug or chemical induced diabetes mellitus w hyperglycemia This is the American ICD-10-CM version of E09.65 - other international versions of ICD-10 E09.65 may differ. Continue reading >>

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