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What Is Different About Diabetic Shoes?

Diabetic Shoes

Diabetic Shoes

Why do you need Diabetic Shoes? Diabetic shoes are important as a common side effect of diabetes is "peripheral neuropathy," which causes loss of sensation in the extremities. Ill-fitting shoes which rub or pinch the feet excessively can lead to ulceration and foot injury, simply because the diabetic does not feel the injury until it is too late. Properly fitted diabetic shoes are very important in preventing such injuries. Companies specializing in pedorthics -- the design of footwear and specialty insoles to help alleviate and/or prevent foot pain and injury -- manufacture special shoes and insoles for diabetics. Diabetic shoes are often wider and deeper than regular shoes, to make room for special diabetic insoles. Pedorthic insoles for diabetics are generally custom made for the patient's feet, to ensure proper fit and minimize rubbing and uneven weight distribution, preventing injury. It is also important for a diabetic to have shoes with good air circulation, meaning a lot of diabetic footwear features fabric or sandal-style uppers. It is very important for a diabetic to have their shoes custom fitted by a trained professional, since they may not be able to feel an improper fit, due to peripheral neuropathy. By ensuring proper fit and good air circulation, properly designed diabetic shoes and insoles prevent pressure ulcers, encourage good blood circulation, and allow the skin to breathe. Some things to look for in good shoe designs for diabetics are: Diabetic Shoes need to have a breathable construction - sandals and fabric shoes are good for this. Deep and wide designs that allow room for custom pedorthic insoles. Designs with no interior seams (or covered seams) to prevent rubbing injuries. Diabetic shoes need a roomy "toe box" to prevent pinching or squeezing Continue reading >>

What Is Special About Diabetic Shoes?

What Is Special About Diabetic Shoes?

While walking is a beneficial activity to our health, and very useful for controlling blood sugar levels, it might come with risks of injuries for people with Diabetes and Neuropathy. Fortunately, most of these foot injuries can be prevented by paying proper attention to foot care, and by wearing Diabetic shoes. What is the special features of diabetic shoes? Diabetic shoes are specially designed shoes intended to offer protection for diabetic feet and reduce the risk of skin breakdown, primarily in cases of poor circulation, neuropathy and foot deformities. Protective Interior - the interior of a diabetic shoe is made with soft material and with no protruding stitching, as sometimes even the smallest prominence can irritate and cause skin breakdown in a diabetic foot. Non-Binding Uppers - the upper of the shoe in the front part of the foot shoe should be soft and with no overlays across the bunions to eliminate pressure points. Stretchable Uppers – in cases where extra protection is needed it is recommended to use shoes with stretchable uppers that shape to the contours of the deformed feet, and help ease pressure points. Orthotic Support - Diabetic shoes feature special insoles that provide support to the arch, conform to the contours of the foot and reduce pressure on the bottom of the foot. Extra-Depth Design -the shoes are made with extra depth to accommodate diabetic insoles or orthotics, and offer loose, pressure free fit. Deep Toe-Box - the tip of the shoe is higher, offering extra room for the toes, including deformed toes such as hammertoes. Multiple Widths - diabetic shoes are available in a variety of widths (at least there widths - Medium, Wide, Extra Wide) to improve fit and protection. Functional Soles - diabetic shoes feature light weight soles with a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shoe Vs Regular Shoe

Diabetic Shoe Vs Regular Shoe

Contents Shoes for Diabetics Foot care for diabetics Diabetic shoe vs regular shoe Crocs google_ad_client="pub-4460228037095254";google_ad_height=250;google_ad_modifications={"plle":true,"eids":["38893302","21061122","191880502"],"loeids":["38893312"]};google_ad_slot="1628626657";google_ad_width=250;google_loader_used="sa";google_ad_format="";google_ad_unit_key="1533784070";google_ad_dom_fingerprint="2259238715";google_sailm=false;google_unique_id=2;google_async_iframe_id="aswift_1";google_start_time=1515797339409;google_pub_vars="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";google_bpp=3;google_async_rrc=0;google_iframe_start_time=new Date().getTime(); Diabetic shoes compared to the regular shoes that we wear every day different because they are specially designed for people who have diabetes. Unlike the regular shoes, the diabetic shoes are made from other materials like Zennon, real leather and others. These materials are specially used to improve the situation of a diabetic foot. Also, the designs o Continue reading >>

Do I Need Diabetic Shoes?

Do I Need Diabetic Shoes?

Poorly controlled blood sugar can damage many parts of the body, including the nerves and vessels that go to the feet. Because of this, people with diabetes have an increased risk of developing foot problems. Wearing specially designed shoes can help reduce risk and promote healthy circulation in your feet. Read on to find out more about shoes designed for people with diabetes and whether you might need them. High blood sugar contributes to poor blood circulation. It can also damage nerves in your feet, a condition called neuropathy. Neuropathy can cause you to lose feeling in your feet, which may make it difficult for you to realize if you cut yourself or injure your foot. If you leave a cut untreated, it can lead to an infection. Poor circulation can make it difficult to heal cuts and infections. Diabetic foot pain and ulcers: Causes and treatments » You might develop open sores on your toes or the bottom of your feet. You may also develop calluses, or thick areas of hardened skin. The following are all more likely to occur in people with diabetes: bunions corns fungal infections gangrene Nerve damage can also change the shape of your feet. People with diabetes are more likely to develop hammertoe, which is a deformity that causes the toe joints to bend inward. Even foot problems that might seem insignificant, like blisters or athlete’s foot, can be a cause of concern if you have diabetes. Because of poor circulation to the area, any foot problem will take longer to heal and may instead compound and grow into a dangerous infection that can progress and lead to amputations if not correctly treated. That’s why any foot issues should be called to the attention of your doctor if you have diabetes. Foot injuries and changes to the foot’s shape can make your regular Continue reading >>

Why Diabetic Shoes?

Why Diabetic Shoes?

Diabetic shoes and inserts compensate for any foot abnormalities including high arch or flat arch. Inserts eliminate excessive irritation caused by high pressure points as you walk on your feet. Inserts and shoes custom fitted by a podiatrist or therapeutic shoe fitter ensure a proper fit that will support your feet and reduce the chance of ulcers. Shoes and inserts from off the shelf in a department store or pharmacy may not give your particular feet the support they need – or worse, they might cause irritation that could lead to a break in the skin. One size does not fit all, so please ask your podiatrist which shoes and inserts are right for your foot type. You should wear your diabetic shoes with inserts everyday. This will help prevent foot ulceration. Using other shoes for long periods of time may increase your risk for developing calluses, blisters and other abrasions that will cause your skin to crack. Medicare’s Therapeutic Shoe Program helps cover part of the cost of a new pair of diabetic shoes and up to three pairs of inserts each year. Ask your podiatrist to examine your feet and determine if you qualify for the program. Continue reading >>

The Low Down On Diabetic Shoes

The Low Down On Diabetic Shoes

Diabetic therapeutic shoes are, in my opinion, one of the most important parts of my job. Diabetic shoes help save feet, plain and simple. According to the American Diabetes Association, each year 600,000 diabetic patients get foot ulcers, resulting in over 80,000 amputations. As a podiatric physician I try to embrace preventative care modalities such as regular diabetic foot exams and diabetic shoes to prevent my patients from getting foot ulcers. My patients will tell you that I’m a stickler about these things. I do understand patient concerns over cost, but the vast majority of insurances cover diabetic shoes and insoles. It is widely accepted that preventative medicine is the best medicine, and not only the monetary cost but also the emotional and physical cost of an amputation makes money spent on diabetic shoes and insoles money well spent. So, what makes diabetic shoes and insoles so different from your run-of-the-mill shoe? Which patients need them? And how do you know if insurance will cover them? Read on for the low down on diabetic shoes. The Definition: Diabetic shoes can also be referred to as extra depth or therapeutic shoes. They are specially designed shoes intended to reduce the risk of skin breakdown in diabetics with co-existing foot problems (such as neuropathy, poor circulation, and foot deformities). Why They’re So Special: Diabetic shoes are extra deep to accommodate diabetic insoles or orthotics. They have a built in firm heel counter to provide medial and lateral rearfoot stability. The toe box of the shoe is higher so there is plenty of room for toes (even ones that like to stick up like hammertoes). There is little to no stitching on the inside of a diabetic shoe. The stitching is on the outside. Sometimes even the smallest prominence can Continue reading >>

Shoes And Orthotics For Diabetics

Shoes And Orthotics For Diabetics

Proper footwear is an important part of an overall treatment program for people with diabetes, even for those in the earliest stages of the disease. If there is any evidence of neuropathy, or lack of sensation, wearing the right footwear is crucial. By working with a physician and a footwear professional, such as a certified pedorthist, many patients can prevent serious diabetic foot complications. Footwear for people with diabetes should achieve the following objectives: Relieve areas of excessive pressure. Any area where there is excessive pressure on the foot can lead to skin breakdown or ulcers. Footwear should help to relieve these high-pressure areas and therefore reduce the occurrence of related problems. Reduce shock and shear. A reduction in the overall amount of vertical pressure, or shock, on the bottom of the foot is desirable, as well as a reduction of horizontal movement of the foot within the shoe, or shear. Accommodate, stabilize and support deformities. Deformities resulting from conditions such as Charcot involvement, loss of fatty tissue, hammer toes and amputations must be accommodated. Many deformities need to be stabilized to relieve pain and avoid further destruction. In addition, some deformities may need to be controlled or supported to decrease progression of the deformity. Limit motion of joints. Limiting the motion of certain joints in the foot can often decrease inflammation, relieve pain, and result in a more stable and functional foot. If you are in the early stages of diabetes, and have no history of foot problems or any loss of sensation, a properly fitting shoe made of soft materials with a shock absorbing sole may be all that you need. It is also important for patients to learn how to select the right type of shoe in the right size, so Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shoe

Diabetic Shoe

Many diabetic shoes have velcro closures for ease of application and removal. Diabetic shoes are sometimes referred to as extra depth, therapeutic shoes or Sugar Shoes. They are specially designed shoes, or shoe inserts, intended to reduce the risk of skin breakdown in diabetics with pre-existing foot disease. People with diabetic neuropathy in their feet may have a false sense of security as to how much at risk their feet actually are.[1] An ulcer under the foot can develop in a couple of hours. The primary goal of therapeutic footwear is to prevent complications, which can include strain, ulcers, calluses, or even amputations for patients with diabetes and poor circulation.[2] Neuropathy can also change the shape of a person's feet, which limits the range of shoes that can be worn comfortably.[3] In addition to meeting strict guidelines, diabetic shoes must be prescribed by a physician and fit by a certified individual, such as an orthotist, podiatrist, therapeutic shoe fitter, or pedorthist. The shoes must also be equipped with a removable orthosis. Foot orthoses are devices such as shoe inserts, arch supports, or shoe fillers such as lifts, wedges and heels. The diabetic shoes and custom-molded inserts work together as a preventive system to help diabetics avoid foot injuries and improve mobility. In the United States, diabetic shoes can be covered by Medicare.[4] [edit] See also[edit] Diabetic sock Diabetic foot Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Shoes? | Orthotic Shop | Orthotic Shop - Articles About Shoes For Foot Health

What Are Diabetic Shoes? | Orthotic Shop | Orthotic Shop - Articles About Shoes For Foot Health

Top 4 Devices To Treat Plantar Fasciitis What are Diabetic Shoes and Why do I Need Them? You may have just gotten back from the doctor learning that you have diabetes, or you may have had diabetes for quite some time, yet need to make some health changes. Many times, doctors may even tell you that you need special shoes known as diabetic shoes. Once you hear this, you probably start wondering just what diabetic shoes are. This blog is going to explore what these shoes are, how they are different from regular footwear, as well as other diabetic footwear available for people. Diabetic shoes are made specifically for individuals who have diabetes and need to keep their feet healthy. These shoes are specially made not to cause skin irritations, help promote blood flow, and will not rub causing calluses or blisters that could become infected. Many people will not wear diabetic shoes until they are told to. Their doctor will tell them what they need to if they have poor blood circulation or diabetic neuropathy. The way that diabetic shoes are different from other shoes is that they are considered to be deeper or extra depth that most other shoes do not have. Other names for these shoes are therapeutic shoes or Sugar Shoes. It is not as hard as you might think to find excellent diabetic shoes that will meet your needs. In some cases, you may have to get custom orders to make sure you get the best shoes to fit your feet, but there are several great shops that help with this, including The Orthotic Shop. Is There Other Diabetic Footwear Available? The good news is that diabetic footwear does not stop at just shoes. You can find a number of different diabetic footwear such as socks and insoles. You may find that you will just need insoles or socks, and sometimes you may find tha Continue reading >>

10 Best Diabetic Shoes Reviewed

10 Best Diabetic Shoes Reviewed

People with diabetes are more susceptible to foot problems. This health affliction can lead to nerve damage that affects a person’s ability to grasp the exact moment when their feet are injured. Consequently, diabetes elevates the risks for getting serious wounds and ulcers on the feet, which may also become serious enough to lead to amputation. Furthermore, diabetes also impacts the ability of the body to heal. This is because the feet receives less blood and oxygen, therefore it takes more time to recover from even a minor skin irritation. A diabetic foot is also more prone to swelling or edema. You can minimize the risks of both short term and long term foot injury, as a diabetes patient, by wearing a pair of good diabetic shoes. These are available in various types – such as diabetic dress shoes, work shoes or walking shoes. Whatever the type, good diabetic shoes are unified in eliminating the risk of diabetic foot injury and the benefits they offer to the wearer. The optimal diabetic shoes are generally made from breathable materials like suede and leather and are created to cushion and support the heel and ankle. Such shoes also help in the even distribution of weight of the body across the foot to eliminate the problem of pain in the pressure points. By Daniel Gonzalez: The latest update includes a revised list of the top 10 shoes for diabetics. This list features shoes from brands such as Skechers, New Balance, Propet and Orthofeet (who are all know to provide the most comfortable, cushioned & specialized shoes around). We’ve also included the criteria we used to evaluate the best diabetic shoes, and some of the most frequently asked questions about the subject. Featured Recommendations An optimal diabetic shoe also comes with more depth to accommodate cus Continue reading >>

Diabetes, 5 Tips To Protect Your Feet

Diabetes, 5 Tips To Protect Your Feet

Diabetes , 5 Tips to Protect Your Feet Diabetes is the #1 reason for limb amputation in the United States. Since poor circulation in these conditions leads to diminished sensation and ability to feel pain, many diabetics are unaware when they sustain foot injuries and are less likely to manage or treat the injury immediately. From playing sports on the beach and swimming, to walking in sandals or open toed shoes, many summer activities put patients with diabetes at risk for foot injuries that could lead to more serious diabetic complications - even amputation. These helpful tips are recommended by Dr. Riccardo Perfetti, Director of the Diabetes Outpatient Treatment and Education Center at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. Maintain proper glucose levels. You should maintain a glucose level lower than 126 mg/dl on a consistent basis. You can do this through regular exercise and close attention to how often you eat and what types of foods you consume. See your physician or nutritionist to develop a diet plan that works for your individual needs and lifestyle. If the shoes fit, wear them - all the time! Diabetics should never walk barefoot, even in-doors. Something as minor as stubbing a toe on a coffee table or bumping a soccer ball at the park can lead to a serious foot ulcer. While at the beach, seashells, glass or debris from the ocean can puncture the skin and cause serious infections that can be perpetuated by diabetes. For diabetics with circulation problems or neuropathy when sensation in the feet is diminished, walking barefoot on hot pavement is especially dangerous and can lead to severe burns and infection. There are a variety of closed-toe beach shoes on the market that help protect feet against these types of injuries. Invest in a couple of Continue reading >>

What Are Diabetic Shoes?

What Are Diabetic Shoes?

| Licensed since 2012 Print People with diabetes sometimes develop problems with their feet, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Medicare may cover therapeutic shoes for diabetics (sometimes called diabetic shoes) with severe diabetic foot disease. Why are diabetic shoes important? Diabetics may suffer from diabetic neuropathy. This type of nerve damage may make feet vulnerable to injuries in a few different ways, according to the National Institutes of Health: Injuries may take longer to heal because of restricted blood flow. Affected limbs may lose sensation, so it’s more difficult to detect an injury and get it treated promptly. If you lose feeling in your feet, an unnoticed injury can lead to an infection. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) suggests quarterly foot exams for diabetics. In addition, the agency recommends a good regimen of home care. This includes keeping feet clean, inspecting feet for injuries, keeping toenails carefully trimmed, and wearing the right socks and shoes. In addition to neuropathy, complications associated with diabetes may even change the shape of the patient’s foot and weaken the muscles. The National Institute of Health, or NIH, recommends checking with a doctor about special diabetic shoes and/or shoe inserts. In some cases, diabetics may need custom-made shoes to provide extra protection. Medicare coverage for diabetic shoes Medicare Part B may cover therapeutic shoes, or diabetic shoes. In order for diabetic shoes to qualify for coverage, a podiatrist or another kind of qualified doctor has to prescribe them. Additionally, a podiatrist, prosthetist, orthotist, pedorthist, or other qualified type of professional has to provide the therapeutic shoes. Part B has some limits to its coverage of diabetic shoes: Par Continue reading >>

Diabetes Shoes: How To Find The Right Diabetic Shoes

Diabetes Shoes: How To Find The Right Diabetic Shoes

Update: We have had dozens of our readers ask us where can they get the best and cheapest diabetic shoes. We suggest you try this link to order. In this comprehensive guide we will cover everything you need to know about diabetic shoes. Do not buy any shoes until you read the guide from start to end. What are diabetic shoes? It is very common amongst people with diabetes to develop foot problems. Per year, the American Diabetes Association indicates that 600,000 people with diabetes get foot ulcers which can result in over 80,000 amputations. Neuropathy is when there is a nerve damage in the foot which can then lead to foot problems. Neuropathy causes tingling, pain, burning or stinging sensations, weakness in the foot. The worst is when you injure your foot, you may not even feel it due to loss of feeling. If you do not have any feeling in your feet, then it may make your injury or illness worse than it was before. It has been shown that people with diabetes have the highest cases of foot or leg amputation due to their foot problems. This is also caused due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD). PAD reduces blood flow to your feet. That along with neuropathy, you can only imagine the possibilities of getting an ulcer or infection on your foot. However, you can prevent matters from getting so serious that you may require an amputation in the future. You need to take good care of your foot. People with diabetes should regularly visit their podiatrists to ensure their feet is taken good care of. Regular care of your feet can also include the addition of proper footwear. You can ask your doctor if you need to start wearing prescription shoes, which may be covered by Medicare or other insurances. I recommend reading the following articles: If you are having trouble walking o Continue reading >>

Many Diabetes Patients Wear The Wrong Shoes

Many Diabetes Patients Wear The Wrong Shoes

Failure to perform recommended foot care and wearing inappropriate footwear can set diabetes patients up for foot ulcers. Ulcers are painful and potentially serious. They can sometimes lead to amputation. Most diabetes patients polled for the study said they know proper foot care and properly fitting shoes are important. But they don't always follow through, according to Stephen Ogedengbe, MD, a researcher at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital in Benin City, Nigeria. He presented the study at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists' meeting in San Diego. ''There is no such thing as perfect footwear for persons with diabetes mellitus," he tells WebMD. "However, there are shoes which can help prevent or delay the onset of foot ulceration in diabetes. There are also shoes which can cause or help accelerate the development of foot ulceration." The study was conducted in Lagos, Nigeria. Ogedengbe and colleagues asked 41 patients with type 2 diabetes, on average about 57 years old, to answer questions about their footwear habits and foot care. The researchers found some good news: 90% had education about footwear 83% wash and dry their feet, a practice recommended daily 51% do the recommended routine self-exams of their feet However, about 56% told the researchers they always or occasionally walk around the house without shoes, which is not recommended. Nearly 15% did so outside, too. Next, researchers evaluated the participants' shoes. They found 68% of the footwear to be inappropriate. Among the shoes that didn't pass muster, Ogedengbe says, are: Shoes with pointed tips or toes High heels Thong-style sandals or flip-flops Besides inappropriate shoe styles, he tells WebMD, some wore shoes that were the wrong size. Despite these flaws in shoe wear, 73% of Continue reading >>

Why Wear Special Shoes For Diabetes?

Why Wear Special Shoes For Diabetes?

No one told me that Type 2 diabetes would make my feet hurt. It was one of those surprises that developed after a few years with this sneaky condition. Burning feet from what my podiatrist called plantar fasciitis was just the beginning. Heel spurs made walking a misery. On top of it all, I was dealing with peripheral neuropathy, the numbness and pain in feet, hands, arms, and legs that comes along with nerve damage from high blood sugar. I did not become aware of my Type 2 diabetes until it had been around for a while. If that happened to you as well, your smallest blood vessels and nerves may have already been damaged before you began treating your diabetes. Early signs of this are feet that feel numb in some spots and extremely sensitive in others. Worst of all, diabetes can also make sores and scratches slow to heal. Reading about foot ulcers and amputations brought home to me how important it is to take care of my feet. Because they take a beating every day, our feet deserve extra care and protection. Diabetes makes this absolutely necessary. My podiatrist recommended shoes made for people with diabetes. If your doctor does too, I encourage you to listen. My feet are living proof that those shoes work. Because of them I can walk again. How are shoes for diabetes different? Shoes for people with diabetes have a higher, wider toe box, giving your toes extra wiggle room. Toes that rub against each other or against a shoe get hot spots and blisters. Those do not heal for us as fast as they did before we had diabetes. Nerve damage caused by diabetes can make your toes feel numb. If this is the case, they cannot warn you when they are rubbing and blistering. The extra room in diabetes shoes protects your toes while you stand and walk. Now that you have diabetes, you need Continue reading >>

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