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What Is Difference In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

If your child or someone you know has been recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering how the disease differs from type 2 diabetes — the form people tend to know more about. What causes type 1 versus type 2 diabetes? Are the symptoms the same? And how is each treated? Here to clear up the confusion with an overview of key differences — and similarities — between these two types of diabetes are experts Julie Settles, M.S.N., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.E.N., a clinical research scientist at Lilly Diabetes, and Rosemary Briars, N.D., P.N.P.-B.C., C.D.E., C.C.D.C., clinical director and program co-director of the Chicago Children’s Diabetes Center at La Rabida Children’s Hospital. Causes Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, as it’s formally known in medical terms, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person develops high blood glucose (blood sugar). The underlying health factors causing the high blood sugar will determine whether someone is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which “the body’s immune system starts to make antibodies that are targeted directly at the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (islet cells),” explains Briars. Over time, the immune system “gradually destroys the islet cells, so insulin is no longer made and the person has to take insulin every day, from then on,” she says. As for why this happens, Settles notes, “The immune system normally fights off viruses and bacteria that we do not want in our body, but when it causes diabetes, it is because something has gone wrong and now the body attacks its own cells.” Triggering this autoimmune response is a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors that researchers are still trying to fully understand. O Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Type1 And Type 2 Diabetes

What's The Difference Between Type1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Do you really know the key difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes? The truth is that diabetes, in itself, can be a confusing term. More often than not, you’ll read and hear a lot about “diabetes” in general, without any mention of the type. While both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterized by a higher than normal blood sugar level, the cause, the development, and often, the preferred treatment aren’t the same. It’s not always clear what type of diabetes someone has. It’s not safe to assume that an overweight middle-aged person will have Type 2 diabetes, just like all teens don’t always suffer from Type 1 diabetes. Since both types can have varied and unpredictable symptoms, it may be difficult to differentiate between the two. Let’s see 6 differences that are very common among T1D and T2D patients. Continue reading >>

Whats The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Whats The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What’s the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? The odds are pretty good that you know someone with diabetes. Affecting more than 30 million Americans, it's an incredibly common—and commonly misunderstood—condition. The word diabetes comes from the Greek for "siphon"—a reference to the frequent and copious urination the condition can cause. The term was coined in the first century by ancient physician Aretaeus the Cappadocian, who vividly (and inaccurately) described the theory that "great masses of flesh are liquefied into urine." Today we know a bit more about this illness, what causes it, and the forms it can take. Diabetes is ultimately a hormone problem. The hormone in question is insulin, which helps the body convert glucose (sugar) into energy. Your pancreas releases a little dose of insulin into your bloodstream when you eat. The insulin tells certain cells to gobble up the glucose you've just added. The cells take in the sugar and put it to work. Or at least that's how it's supposed to go. If you've got diabetes , the situation looks a little different. Like rheumatoid arthritis or celiac disease, type 1 diabetes is the result of a person being attacked by their own immune system. In rheumatoid arthritis, the issue manifests in the joints; in celiac disease, it occurs in the gut; and in type 1 diabetes, it's the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas that are targeted by the immune system. Little fluctuations in blood sugar that would breeze right through a healthy system can wreak havoc in the body of someone with type 1. People with type 1 must keep a very close eye on their glucose levels and take supplemental insulin , in shots or through a pen, port, pump, or inhaler, as blood sugar that goes too low or too high can cause serious compli Continue reading >>

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

The Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

I realize this might be old news for all you veterans of diabetes out there, but I thought this week I might write a little bit about the key differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. I thought this might be helpful for newcomers to our “Diabetian community” (and let me say that while I’m sorry you find yourself with the diagnosis, we’re happy to welcome you here), or as a resource to share with friends and family who can often have a hard time understanding the differences. The understanding within the general public tends to be something along the lines of this: Diabetics can’t have sugar. That’s about it. So odds are pretty good that someone new to this disease is coming in with an idea that diabetes means you can’t ever have another cookie, but food without sugar is OK. And most of your friends and family will probably CONTINUE to think that well after you’ve gathered more information. Furthermore, the understanding of “Type 1” and “Type 2,” even among people who understand that there ARE two types, is often limited to age brackets — Type 1 is diabetes that starts when someone is young, Type 2 is what you get if you’re post-30. Or, more recently, Type 2 diabetes is linked solely to obesity, while Type 1 is…still diabetes for young people. Two diseases, one name An author of a study I once read pointed out that it’s rather unfortunate that we give the same name to these two diseases, because the mechanisms for how they work, AND the regimen for how we treat them, are very different. So then, without further ado, here is the lowdown on Type 1 diabetes, with Type 2 diabetes in a nutshell to come next week. Type 1 diabetes is the result of an immune system malfunction. A virus moves through our body, usually without us ever even kno Continue reading >>

Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes | Prevention

Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes | Prevention

When people hear that you have diabetes , they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetesI was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years agoI'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby .) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas . "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. MORE: 7 Reasons You're Tired All The Time 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isnt enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and dest Continue reading >>

Video: What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Video: What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

While they're both technically under the umbrella of diabetes, type 1 and type 2 are very different conditions which require a distinct set of treatments. We've looked at some of the main questions people have around each. Play Video Play Mute 0:00 / 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE 0:00 Playback Rate 1x Chapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps Reset restore all settings to the default valuesDone Close Modal Dialog End of dialog window. What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Dr Sarah Jarvis, GP There are several different kinds of diabetes, but two main ones. Type 1 diabetes is nothing to do with lifestyle. It's what's called an auto-immune disease. We think that you inherit tendency to have type 1 diabetes and then a trigger in your environment (possibly a virus infection, and there may well be lots of them) triggers your body to start recognising the beta cells of the pancreas as an enemy and start attacking them so that they can no longer make insulin. Type 2 diabetes on the other hand is largely to do with lifestyle. You can inherit a t Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chan Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Vs Type 2

Type 1 Diabetes Vs Type 2

National Diabetes Month is coming to a close. Unfortunately, diabetes isn’t going away any time soon. According to the American Diabetes Association, 1.4 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes each year. And 86 million people in the United States with prediabetes are headed towards developing Type 2 diabetes. Diabetes isn’t unique to the United States: It’s a global issue, affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Many people describe diabetes as being a pandemic. When people are diagnosed with diabetes, they often have many questions, especially about the differences between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. There are, in fact, multiple different forms of diabetes (too many to get into in this week’s posting!), but the more common forms are Type 1 and Type 2. Let’s take a look at these this week and hopefully clear up any confusion or questions you may have. Type 1 diabetes Name: Type 1 diabetes was formerly known as “juvenile diabetes” and “insulin-dependent diabetes.” These terms are inaccurate and obsolete. We know that it’s not just “juveniles” who get Type 1 diabetes — adults get Type 1, too, and many people who have Type 2 diabetes must take insulin. So, Type 1 diabetes is the correct term. Definition: Type 1 diabetes (also known as Type 1 diabetes mellutis, or T1DM) is an autoimmune condition. This means that the body’s immune system turns on itself; in this case, it attacks the beta cells of the pancreas. These are the cells that produce insulin. As a result, the pancreas produces very little, if any, insulin. Causes: Scientists don’t exactly know what causes Type 1 diabetes. However, it’s likely that genetics and environmental factors, such as certain types of viruses, play a role. Prevalence: Type 1 diabetes accounts Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (or diabetes) is a chronic, lifelong condition that affects your body's ability to use the energy found in food. There are three major types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. All types of diabetes mellitus have something in common. Normally, your body breaks down the sugars and carbohydrates you eat into a special sugar called glucose. Glucose fuels the cells in your body. But the cells need insulin, a hormone, in your bloodstream in order to take in the glucose and use it for energy. With diabetes mellitus, either your body doesn't make enough insulin, it can't use the insulin it does produce, or a combination of both. Since the cells can't take in the glucose, it builds up in your blood. High levels of blood glucose can damage the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, heart, eyes, or nervous system. That's why diabetes -- especially if left untreated -- can eventually cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and nerve damage to nerves in the feet. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, because it often begins in childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It's caused by the body attacking its own pancreas with antibodies. In people with type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes may be caused by a genetic predisposition. It could also be the result of faulty beta cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. A number of medical risks are associated with type 1 diabetes. Many of them stem from damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves (diabetic neuropathy), and kidneys (diabetic nephropathy). Even more serious is the increased risk of hea Continue reading >>

5 Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

5 Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

5 Differences Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes is one of the oldest and yet most misunderstood diseases. There are many different types of diabetes, however, the most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. They differ based on how they are caused and treated. But the main similarity that Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes do share is elevated blood glucose levels. The inability to control blood glucose levels will also cause the same symptoms and complications in both. Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system mistakes the insulin producing cells in the pancreas as invaders and attacks them. Once this happens, the cells can no longer produce insulin and a person is therefore insulin dependent for life in order to stay alive. Type 2 Diabetes is a metabolic condition. Its when the body doesnt produce enough insulin or becomes resistant to it. The condition can sometimes be controlled with proper diet and exercise, or a drug to enhance sensitivity to the bodys insulin production. But sometimes natural insulin production is insufficient and insulin injections are then needed to sustain normal blood glucose levels. People with Type 1 Diabetes DO NOT produce insulin. Insulin is a hormone that a working pancreas releases to allow glucose (sugar) from carbohydrates thats eaten to be absorbed for energy. Without this hormone, the body starves and eventually dies. This is why everyday insulin injections is necessary for survival and early diagnosis detection is SO IMPORTANT. Insulin is normally still produced by people with Type 2 Diabetes. In order to regain sensitivity to insulin, proper diet and exercise is recommended. In some cases, insulin injections are needed to keep diabetes in better control. Currently, there is no prevention for Type 1 Diabet Continue reading >>

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

There are three major types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. All types of diabetes cause blood glucose levels to be higher than normal, but they do this in different ways Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes can occur at any age, but is most commonly diagnosed from infancy to the late 30s. With this type of diabetes, a person’s pancreas produces no insulin. It occurs when the body’s own defence system (the immune system) attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. What causes the immune system to do this is not yet completely understood, but we are funding research to find out. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is by far the most common type of diabetes – in the UK over 90 per cent of people with diabetes have type 2. Type 2 diabetes usually affects those over 40, or 25 if you’re of South Asian descent. However, it is becoming more common among young people due to lifestyle. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes are not always obvious and, unlike with type 1, they can take a long time to develop. People with type 2 diabetes either don’t make enough insulin or don’t make insulin that the body can use properly. The cells in the body become resistant to insulin, making a greater amount of insulin necessary to keep blood glucose levels within a normal range. Eventually, the pancreas can wear out from producing extra insulin, and it may start making less and less. Type 2 can usually be managed through diet, exercise, and self-monitoring blood glucose, at least in the first few years following diagnosis. However, type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, and most people will need to take tablets and/or inject insulin after living with it for five to 10 years. LADA Up to a third of people who were initially diagnosed as having type Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key. People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key. Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications. Both types of diabetes, if not controlled, share many similar symptoms, including: frequent urination feeling very thirsty and drinking a lot feeling very hungry feeling very fatigued blurry vision cuts or sores that don’t heal properly People with type 1 diabetes may also experience irritability and mood changes, and unintentionally lose weight. People with type 2 diabetes may also have numbness and tingling in their hands or feet. Although many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar, they present in very different ways. Many people with type 2 diabetes won’t have symptoms for many years. Then often the symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop slowly over the course of time. Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all and don’t discover their condition until complications develop. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop fast, typically over the course of several weeks. Type 1 diabetes, which was once known as juvenile diabetes, usually develops in childhood or adolescence. But it’s possible to get type 1 diabetes later in life. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have simi Continue reading >>

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

Type 1 Vs. Type 2 Diabetes: Which One Is Worse?

What are the differences between the causes of type 1 and type 2? The underlying causes of type 1 and type 2 are different. Type 1 diabetes causes Type 1 diabetes is believed to be due to an autoimmune process, in which the body's immune system mistakenly targets its own tissues (islet cells in the pancreas). In people with type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas that are responsible for insulin production are attacked by the misdirected immune system. This tendency for the immune system to destroy the beta cells of the pancreas is likely to be, at least in part, genetically inherited, although the exact reasons that this process happens are not fully understood. Exposure to certain viral infections (mumps and Coxsackie viruses) or other environmental toxins have been suggested as possible reasons why the abnormal antibody responses develop that cause damage to the pancreas cells. The primary problem in type 2 diabetes is the inability of the body's cells to use insulin properly and efficiently, leading to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and diabetes. This problem affects mostly the cells of muscle and fat tissues, and results in a condition known as insulin resistance. In type 2 diabetes, there also is a steady decline of beta cells that worsens the process of elevated blood sugars. At the beginning, if someone is resistant to insulin, the body can at least partially increase production of insulin enough to overcome the level of resistance. Over time, if production decreases and enough insulin cannot be released, blood sugar levels rise. In many cases this actually means the pancreas produces larger than normal quantities of insulin, but the body is not able to use it effectively. A major feature of type 2 diabetes is a lack of sensitivity to insulin by the ce Continue reading >>

How To Understand The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

How To Understand The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Edit Article There's a distinctive trend in the questions that diabetics and their family members usually ask. This article will help answer one of these most prominent questions: What is Diabetes and most importantly, how does one differentiate between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? 1 Understand that diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot control the level of glucose (sugar) in its blood because of one of the following (or both, in Type 1): The pancreas (is damaged) produces insufficient insulin (little or none in Type 1). The body cells resist the action of insulin especially in Type 2, when the pancreas overproduces insulin. Insulin resistance, when the your cells do not use insulin the right way, and then more insulin may be needed for getting enough food into your cells. 2 Realize the fact that type 1 and type 2 diabetes are two totally different types of diabetes. Diabetes, unlike the common myth, does not begin with Type 1 and then progress to Type 2. 3 Understand that people diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes eventually do not produce any insulin. They need to be treated with insulin given by insulin syringes and injection or via insulin pumps for diabetics (insulin via a tablet would not be effective as it would be destroyed in the digestion process). 4 Understand that Type 2 Diabetes is the more common form of diabetes. Obesity is the primary reason for Type 2 diabetes. People diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes do not produce sufficient quantities of insulin for the increased numbers of active fat cells that need it. Initially your pancreas responds to the demand (created by obesity), by producing more insulin. However, it is overworked and cannot do so indefinitely. Corrective action includes reducing body fat by choosing lower caloric diet and being more acti Continue reading >>

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