diabetestalk.net

What Is Diabetic Seizure?

Epilepsy And Diabetes – Confusion Or Common “cure”?

Epilepsy And Diabetes – Confusion Or Common “cure”?

You might be surprised to hear it, but according to recent research, epilepsy and diabetes have more in common than we thought. The key commonality is fluctuating blood sugar. People with hyperglycemia tend to have focal or local seizures. And those who are hypoglycemic, tend to have tonic-clonic seizures… Although some patients and even some doctors disagree, there’s really not much difference between a diabetic seizure and other forms of seizures, such as those caused by epilepsy. While the symptoms are generally the same — there is one very significant difference — the blood sugar irregularities which can cause a diabetic seizure can also cause the diabetic patient to lapse into a coma. One dilemma facing both types of seizures are their origin. If the seizures are caused by blood sugar fluctuations, treatment with anti-seizure drugs which address electrical impulses in the brain are addressing the wrong problems. Yet we all know that diet plays an important part in controlling epilepsy. Interestingly enough, initial testing shows that a diabetes drug widely used to help diabetics manage their condition could also become recognized as an effective and secure way of treating epilepsy. According to reports, Metformin (brand name Glucophage) could be particularly useful in treating those epilepsy patients who are drug resistant. Glucophage, a popular oral drug for type 2 diabetes, helps lower blood sugar levels by improving the way the body handles insulin. Much like the Ketogenic Diet which treats epilepsy by minimizing levels of dietary starch and sugar. A team headed up by Dr. Avtar Roopra found that Glucophage was able to turn on a molecule that regulates energy, and then found that they could suppress over-active nerve cells by inhibiting the transfer of su Continue reading >>

Diabetic Seizures – What Are They? Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

Diabetic Seizures – What Are They? Symptoms, Causes, And Treatments

A diabetic seizure is a serious medical condition and without emergency treatment, it has proven to be fatal. Extremely low levels of sugar in the diabetic’s blood cause these seizures. That is why it is so important for those who have diabetes to monitor and control their blood sugar. What Are the Causes? A number of different things can actually cause a diabetic seizure to occur. It could happen because too much insulin is injected, or because the diabetic did not eat right after taking insulin. Some of the other potential causes include not eating meals regularly or drinking too much alcohol. Even certain oral diabetes medications can make the body produce excess insulin. Those who are exercising too much without taking into account how this will affect their insulin levels will also be at a greater risk of suffering a diabetic stroke. No matter what causes the seizure, it is always a medical emergency and those who have one need immediate medical attention. What Are the Symptoms? When entering the first stages of a diabetic seizure, the person may exhibit a number of different symptoms. Some of the most common symptoms include: Sweating Clamminess Drowsiness Confusion Bodily shakes Hallucinations Rapid and unexpected emotional changes Weakness in the muscles Anxiety Vision changes Loss of ability to speak clearly After these initial symptoms, the next phase of symptoms begin and the danger level rises. Now, the person may stare into space and be non-communicative and uncontrollable body movements and contractions of the muscles may occur. In some cases, the diabetic will be unaware of the movements and may even fall into unconsciousness. What Is the Prevention and Treatment? The best way to deal with this problem is by ensuring it does not occur in the first place Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia - Low Blood Sugar

What is Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar)? 1. The brain requires glucose (blood sugar) for normal functioning, and unlike many other organs, the brain has a very limited ability to store glucose. As such, the brain is the organ that is most affected when blood sugar gets too low. 2. Low blood sugar can cause seizures 3. Puppies - especially small breed puppies - are particularly susceptible to low blood sugar because their liver is not able to store sufficient amounts of glycogen, as compared with older dogs. 4. Hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening - even fatal - condition, and is known to be a cause of canine seizures. The occurrence of symptoms depends on how far, and how fast, the blood sugar has dropped 5. Treating Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar): During an attack of hypoglycemia your goal is to stay calm, to bring the blood glucose back to a safe level, to continue to observe your dog. You can contact your veterinarian if you feel you need to. These are general guidelines for treating hypoglycemia. Ask your veterinarian for information that is specific to your dog. Severe hypoglycemia: If your dog is severely hypoglycemic, especially if it is having seizures or unconscious, you must give Haggen-Dazs vanilla ice cream immediately. Carefully rub small amounts of ice cream on the inside of the cheeks and gums. Do not put a lot of liquid in the dog's mouth, and be sure the dog does not choke. Do not stick your fingers inside the teeth of a dog that is having seizures - you may get bitten. Then, call your veterinarian if you feel you need further guidance. If your dog continues to be unconscious your dog should be taken to the veterinary emergency room immediately. Moderate hypoglycemia: Haggen-Dazs plain vanilla ice cream should be given, either alone, or combined with f Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

00:58 Jasmine having a seizure from low blood glucose or hypoglycemia-Quote from Jasmine's family: "IF YOU SEE THIS OR SIMILAR SYMPTOMS IN YOUR DOG, TAKE HIM/HER TO THE VET IMMEDIATELY. Diabetes and the resulting symptoms such as severe hypoglycemia CAN BE LIFE THREATENING." Hypoglycemia, also referred to as an insulin reaction, [1] is what every diabetic fears -- very low blood glucose. Since the brain requires glucose for fuel at every second, [2] it's possible to induce coma, seizures, brain damage [3][4][5] and death by letting blood glucose drop too low. Because the brain is almost totally dependent on glucose to make use of oxygen, [6] it is somewhat like having severe breathing problems. Though the causes and mechanisms are different, in both cases the brain does not have enough oxygen, and similar symptoms and problems can occur. It is caused by giving too much insulin for the body's current needs. The blood glucose level at which an animal (or person) is dangerously hypoglycemic is fuzzy, and depends on several factors. [7] The line is different for diabetics and non-diabetics, and differs between individuals and depending on exogenous insulin and what the individual is accustomed to. The most likely time for an acute hypoglycemia episode is when the insulin is working hardest, or at its peak; this is when blood glucose levels are at their lowest, or nadir, due to the action of the insulin. Mild lows may cause lethargy and sleepiness. [8] An acute hypoglycemic episode can happen even if you are careful, since pets' insulin requirements sometimes change without warning. Pets and people can have hypoglycemic episodes because of increases to physical activity. [9][10] What makes those with diabetes prone to hypoglycemia is that muscles require glucose for proper f Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetic Seizure, Warning Signs And Symptoms:

What Is A Diabetic Seizure, Warning Signs And Symptoms:

As diabetics we should all be very familiar with hypoglycemia but for those who are not, what is hypoglycemia and how can it effect us? Hypoglycemia is the clinical syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person, as can the severity as I’ve personally dealt with in the past when my severe low was accompanied with a seizure. This was the first time this as ever happened to me since being diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic over 11 years ago now. While I don’t remember the seizure itself, lets just say we made it a memorable experience for the community as it happened at my sons fall soccer tournament. So what is a hypoglycemic seizure and what are the warning signs of having a seizure? Lets take a closer look! What Is A Hypoglycemic Seizure: So what causes a seizure? A hypoglycemic seizure may be triggered by injecting too much insulin, or failing to eat soon enough after using a fast acting insulin (exactly what happened to me); excessive use of alcohol, skipping meals,or exercising vigorously without adjusting insulin dosages or eating properly. A seizure may also be triggered by oral diabetes medications that cause the pancreas to produce more insulin. Whatever the cause of the seizure, it needs to be treated as a medical emergency. To identify the onset of ahypoglycemic seizure,look for the following warning signs of seizures and symptoms: Sweating Confusion Feeling faint or too sleepy Shakiness Feeling cold or clammy Hallucinations Unexplained emotional behaviors Uncontrollable crying Unaware of surroundings Changes in vision Loss of ability to speak clearly Loss of muscle control Muscle weakness Anxiety So what happens during a seizure? If a diabetic seizure is untreated you may become unconscious, fall and ha Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Cats

Hypoglycemia In Cats

Hypoglycemia most commonly occurs in cats with diabetes. This is because a diabetic cat requires a diligent, daily routine of timed feedings, injections and moderate exercise. Any upset to the routine or misapplication of insulin can lead to the cat going into a hypoglycemic state. A cat who has been previously diagnosed with diabetes can also go into diabetic remission within the first four months of treatment and no longer need injections. This can easily lead to overdosing the cat with insulin. Rarely, a cat who does not have diabetes can become hypoglycemic. This is often due to problems with the liver or pancreas, and in some cases can be caused by an infection of the blood. If the cat becomes unconscious, the situation is a medical emergency. Sugar is naturally processed in the body by the hormone insulin, which is produced in the pancreas. If too much insulin exists in the body, either from injections if a cat has diabetes or from the pancreas overproducing the hormone, blood sugar levels can become too low for normal body function. While other organs can use fat or protein if sugar is scarce, the brain requires glucose to operate. When levels of glucose in the bloodstream drop below 60 milligrams per deciliter, a cat is referred to as hypoglycemic. The brain then begins to rapidly lose function. This condition can be fatal if not addressed immediately. In the early stages of low blood sugar, a cat may only produce subtle symptoms. If you have a diabetic cat, be sure to learn the beginning signs of hypoglycemia. If blood sugar is not raised in time, certain damage to the brain may be permanent. Symptoms to watch for include: Increased appetite Vomiting a green/yellow bile (indication of pancreatitis) Dilated pupils Tachypnea (rapid breathing) Restlessness Anxiety Continue reading >>

What's It Like: To Suffer A Diabetic Coma

What's It Like: To Suffer A Diabetic Coma

What is a diabetic coma? One of the risks associated with diabetes is what's known as a diabetic coma. A person with diabetes might suffer from a diabetic coma if his or her blood sugar levels get too high, a condition known as hyperglycemia, or go too low, which is referred to as hypoglycemia. A diabetic coma can result because of complications related to either. Diabetes is a group of diseases characterized by high blood glucose levels that result from defects in the body's ability to produce and/or use insulin. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form in Oklahoma, which has consistently ranked in the top 10 nationally for the prevalence of diabetes in the state. About 305,000 adults in Oklahoma have been diagnosed with diabetes. Oklahoma has one of the highest diabetes death rates in the nation, and it's the sixth leading cause of death in Oklahoma. How is it treated? A hyperglycemic hyperosmolar coma — a result of extremely high blood sugar — is a medical emergency. This is more common in people who have type 2 diabetes than type 1 diabetes patients. When blood sugar gets too high, it draws fluid from the inside of brain cells, and you suffer from brain dysfunction. To help pull the person out of the coma, medical professionals will give that person fluids and insulin. Symptoms of hyperglycemia include decreasing levels of consciousness, frequent bathroom trips and extreme thirst. Sometimes hyperglycemia can be brought on by another condition or illness, such as urinary tract infections or pneumonia. Meanwhile, a person suffering from a coma because of low blood sugar might have a faster turnaround time. Usually, these people notice symptoms related to hypoglycemia and then ingest glucose. Early symptoms for hypoglycemia include an increased heart rate, chest pal Continue reading >>

What Are Symptoms Of A Diabetic Seizure?

What Are Symptoms Of A Diabetic Seizure?

A seizure may also be triggered by oral diabetes medications that cause the pancreas to produce more insulin. Whatever the cause of the seizure, it needs to be treated as a medical emergency. To identify the onset of a hypoglycemic seizure, look for the following warning signs of seizures and symptoms: Sweating Confusion Feeling faint or too sleepy Shakiness Feeling cold or clammy Hallucinations Unexplained emotional behaviors Uncontrollable crying Unaware of surroundings Changes in vision Loss of ability to speak clearly Loss of muscle control Muscle weakness Anxiety Continue reading >>

Short Communication Study Of Prevalence Of Epilepsy In Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Short Communication Study Of Prevalence Of Epilepsy In Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

1. Introduction There are conflicting reports of a possible association between type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) and epilepsy, particularly idiopathic generalised epilepsy (IGE). Two studies,1,2 one exclusively undertaken in adults,1 showed an increased prevalence of epilepsy in patients withT1D; in contrast a single paediatric study suggested that childhood epilepsy was no more frequently seen in children with T1D than in the general paediatric population.3 Speculation on this possible association has focused on the role of autoimmunity and specifically antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) which are elevated in many patients with T1D4 and also in a number of neurological diseases.5 The aim of this study was to try and confirm or refute this reported association. A review of clinical notes and investigations was carried out on children with T1D who were under follow-up in the Paediatric Diabetes Clinic at Alder Hey Children's Hospital. 2. Patients and methods Data were collected on all children aged <16 years who had a diagnosis of T1D and who had attended the Paediatric Diabetes Clinic at least once in the 12 months of 2010 prior to the study. The clinic served a local (secondary) population. Data were extracted from the patients’ case notes and the specific medical and nursing notes. In addition, all the patients in the Diabetic Clinic database were cross-checked with the EEG departmental database (which is under the supervision of RA) and the complete epilepsy patient database held by the epilepsy nurse specialists at the hospital. Finally, the paediatric neurologists and epilepsy nurse specialists were also asked to identify all patients who were known to have dual diagnoses of diabetes and epilepsy. Epilepsy was diagnosed when two or more unprovoked eugl Continue reading >>

Service Dogs For Independence

Service Dogs For Independence

What is a Diabetic Alert Dog? Diabetic Alert Dogs are trained to alert diabetic owners in advance of low (hypoglycemia) or high (hyperglycemia) blood sugar events before they become dangerous, so their owners can take steps to return their blood sugar to normal, such as using glucose sweets or taking insulin. A dog specifically trained to react to the chemical change produced by blood sugar highs and lows . Diabetic alert dogs can provide emotional security and a sense of balance for individuals and for those who have a loved one with diabetes. They can help you lead a more confident, independent lifestyle. What is a seizure dog? A seizure dog is a dog that has been trained (or has learned) to respond to a seizure in someone who has epilepsy. Is "seizure dog" the official name? It is the name that is most often used. Some people distinguish between dogs that respond to someone who is having a seizure (seizure response dog) and dogs that appear to know when a seizure is going to occur (seizure predicting dog). What do seizure dogs do? A response dog might be trained to bark when a child has a seizure so that family members know what is happening. Or, a seizure dog may put its body in between the seizing individual and the floor to break the fall at the inception of a seizure. Some seizure dogs may even be trained to activate some kind of pre-programmed device such as a pedal that rings an alarm. A seizure predicting dog is taught scent to alert the person before a seizure occurs. Narcolepsy Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder that disrupts both the onset of sleep and the sleep cycle, including REM sleep. Because it is difficult to study human sleep behavior and physiology, researchers have turned to other mammals that have narcolepsy. These dogs are trained in the same way a Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes In Dogs: Symptoms, Causes, & Treatment

Diabetes is a chronic disease that can affect dogs and cats and other animals (including apes, pigs, and horses) as well as humans. Although diabetes can’t be cured, it can be managed very successfully. Diabetes mellitus, or “sugar diabetes,” is the type of diabetes seen most often in dogs. It is a metabolism disorder. Metabolism refers to how the body converts food to energy. To understand what diabetes is, it helps to understand some of this process. The conversion of food nutrients into energy to power the body’s cells involves an ongoing interplay of two things: • Glucose: essential fuel for the body’s cells. When food is digested, the body breaks down some of the nutrients into glucose, a type of sugar that is a vital source of energy for certain body cells and organs. The glucose is absorbed from the intestines into the blood, which then transports the glucose throughout the body. • Insulin: in charge of fuel delivery. Meanwhile, an important organ next to the stomach called the pancreas releases the hormone insulin into the body. Insulin acts as a “gatekeeper” that tells cells to grab glucose and other nutrients out of the bloodstream and use them as fuel. What is diabetes? With diabetes, the glucose-insulin connection isn’t working as it should. Diabetes occurs in dogs in two forms: • Insulin-deficiency diabetes—This is when the dog’s body isn’t producing enough insulin. This happens when the pancreas is damaged or otherwise not functioning properly. Dogs with this type of diabetes need daily shots to replace the missing insulin. This is the most common type of diabetes in dogs. • Insulin-resistance diabetes—This is when the pancreas is producing some insulin, but the dog’s body isn’t utilizing the insulin as it should. The ce Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a reversible form of coma found in people with diabetes mellitus. It is a medical emergency.[1] Three different types of diabetic coma are identified: Severe low blood sugar in a diabetic person Diabetic ketoacidosis (usually type 1) advanced enough to result in unconsciousness from a combination of a severely increased blood sugar level, dehydration and shock, and exhaustion Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (usually type 2) in which an extremely high blood sugar level and dehydration alone are sufficient to cause unconsciousness. In most medical contexts, the term diabetic coma refers to the diagnostical dilemma posed when a physician is confronted with an unconscious patient about whom nothing is known except that they have diabetes. An example might be a physician working in an emergency department who receives an unconscious patient wearing a medical identification tag saying DIABETIC. Paramedics may be called to rescue an unconscious person by friends who identify them as diabetic. Brief descriptions of the three major conditions are followed by a discussion of the diagnostic process used to distinguish among them, as well as a few other conditions which must be considered. An estimated 2 to 15 percent of diabetics will suffer from at least one episode of diabetic coma in their lifetimes as a result of severe hypoglycemia. Types[edit] Severe hypoglycemia[edit] People with type 1 diabetes mellitus who must take insulin in full replacement doses are most vulnerable to episodes of hypoglycemia. It is usually mild enough to reverse by eating or drinking carbohydrates, but blood glucose occasionally can fall fast enough and low enough to produce unconsciousness before hypoglycemia can be recognized and reversed. Hypoglycemia can be severe enough to cause un Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetic Seizure?

What Is A Diabetic Seizure?

Diabetes is known to cause a number of severe problems, including seizures and comas. A diabetic seizure occurs when the body receives a number of different signals from the brain that happen at the same time and contradict each other. Seizures in general can be caused by a number of different problems, including high or low blood glucose levels. A seizure is a serious condition and can result in death in some cases. Although a person may be alert during a diabetic seizure, he or she often will not be fully aware of what is going on. For this reason, it can be difficult for surrounding people to know how to treat the condition, since the person having the seizure cannot provide any advice. Emergency medical officials should be contacted immediately, unless the person caring for the patient is experienced and knows how to handle the problem. There are a number of different symptoms of a diabetic seizure caused by high or low blood glucose levels. The seizure often induces violent and sudden convulsions although these aren’t always present. Muscle weakness, confusion, sweating and a lack of awareness are other common signs. There are a large number of different types of seizures which are categorized according to the type of symptoms they induce. Many of these seizures have unknown causes. Some types of seizures may not induce the shaking and convulsions which many people associate with the problem. For example, a seizure can cause the person to smell a strange scent when no on else can or suffer from alterations in his or her vision. Sometimes a seizure will last for no longer than a few seconds, while other times it will not stop on its own. A common mistake among people trying to treat a diabetic seizure for low blood glucose levels is to attempt to feed the person. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetic Emergency

Diabetes is a lifelong medical condition where the body cannot produce enough insulin. Insulin is a chemical made by the pancreas (a gland behind the stomach), which regulates the blood sugar (glucose) level in the body. Normally our bodies automatically keep the right blood sugar levels, but for someone with diabetes their body can't. Instead, they have to control the blood sugar level themselves by monitoring what they eat, and taking insulin injections or pills. There are two types of diabetes: Type1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, and Type 2, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Sometimes people who have diabetes may have a diabetic emergency, where their blood sugar becomes either too high or too low. Both conditions are potentially serious and may need treatment in hospital. Watch our video - diabetic emergency Hyperglycaemia Too little insulin can cause high blood sugar (hyperglycaemia). If it’s not treated and gets worse, the person can gradually become unresponsive (going into a diabetic coma). So it's important to get them to see a doctor in case they need emergency treatment. Hypoglycaemia Too much insulin can cause low blood sugar or hypoglycaemia (hypo). This often happens when someone with diabetes misses a meal or does too much exercise. It can also happen after someone has had an epileptic seizure or has been binge drinking. If someone knows they are diabetic, they may recognise the start of a hypo attack, but without help they may quickly become weak and unresponsive. What to look for - Diabetic emergency If you think someone is having a diabetic emergency, you need to check against the symptoms listed below to decide if their blood sugar is too high or too low. High blood sugar (hyperglycaemia) • Warm, dry skin • Rapid pulse and breathin Continue reading >>

Seizures (fits): Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

Seizures (fits): Symptoms, Diagnosis And Treatment

What are seizures? A seizure, also known as a fit, is caused by a disturbance in the electrical activity of the brain, which can be due to conditions such as epilepsy. A person having a seizure may not show any obvious symptoms, but in severe cases they may lose consciousness or experience convulsions. Seizures usually begin suddenly but are often different in their duration and severity. A person may have one seizure and no further symptoms, or they may have further seizures. Not everyone who has a seizure will be diagnosed with epilepsy. Causes of non-epileptic seizures include diabetes, heart conditions, and mental health conditions. Types of seizure There are 2 main types of seizure: Generalised seizures involve both sides of the brain from the start of the attack. Common subtypes include tonic-clonic (grand mal) and absence seizures (petit mal). Febrile and infantile spasms are two types of generalised seizures that occur almost exclusively in young children. Partial (or focal) seizures are the second major seizure type. These begin in a specific area of the brain and may be contained there. Or they may spread to the entire brain. With simple partial seizures, the person remains conscious. Complex partial seizures involve impaired consciousness. What causes seizures? Often the cause of a seizure is unknown. Many conditions can provoke seizures, including: Brain tumour Head injuries Electrolyte imbalance Very low blood sugar Repetitive sounds or flashing lights, such as in video games Medications, such as anti-psychotics and some asthma drugs Withdrawal from medications, such as certain tranquillisers or narcotics, or alcohol Use of drugs such as cocaine and heroin Brain infections, such as meningitis What are the symptoms of seizures? Symptoms of seizures vary wide Continue reading >>

More in diabetes