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What Is Diabetes Fatigue?

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Being plagued by excessive fatigue is bad enough, but problems with blood sugar regulation can also lead to even scarier downstream issues including heart disease, stroke, cancer, dementia, and more. Feeling sleepy all the time and being chronically fatigued are classic reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms. The standard American diet, high in simple sugars and processed foods, is notorious for causing problems with blood sugar regulation. In the short term, eating a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs (like white flour) can cause you to experience wild swings in blood sugar. These large blood sugar swings make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. Feeling sleepy all the time and experiencing these other symptoms of blood sugar dysregulation after a high-carb meal is not normal, nor is it healthy. These are the classic signs of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and they may be insulin resistance symptoms, which is more serious and could be an early warning sign of diabetes down the road according to the medical journal, Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity.[1] So how are sugars and sweets linked to the problem of feeling sleepy all the time along with reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms? Eating this way carries with it a “high glycemic load,” meaning it contains high amounts of the kind of carbohydrates which quickly release their sugars into the bloodstream. High-glycemic-load diets have been shown in human studies to lead to feeling sleepy all the time, daytime fatigue, poorer sleep, and slower cognitive performance.[2,3] In the long term, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages Continue reading >>

Cause Of Fatigue For Days After Exercise In Diabetics

Cause Of Fatigue For Days After Exercise In Diabetics

So when a person with diabetes is still suffering from fatigue even days after exercise, there’s a particular situation going on. “The main cause of fatigue after exercise that lasts is being low on muscle glycogen stores,” explains Sheri Colberg, PhD, Professor Emerita, Exercise Science, Old Dominion University, founder of Diabetes Motion, and one of the world’s leading experts on diabetes and exercise. “Depending on how much of these carbohydrate stores that you use up during an exercise session, it can take 24 to 48 hours to fully replenish them — assuming you’re eating a diet with enough carbohydrates in it. “If you are on a low-carb diet [as many diabetics are], it can take much longer for glycogen to be repleted, and that can make people feel tired when they try to do any type of activity. “If you’re eating enough carbs (usually at least 40 percent of total calories coming from carbs when you’re training regularly is required for optimal recovery), you also have to keep your blood glucose in good control for glycogen restoration to occur in a timely manner.” Causes of Longer Lasting Fatigue in Diabetics After Exercise “Thus, longer lasting fatigue can be related to: 1) not enough carbohydrate intake after workouts so glycogen levels remain lower; 2) poorly managed blood glucose levels (which also can impact glycogen restoration); or possibly 3) low iron levels (anemia).” It’s important to check your blood sugar at various points in the days following your exercise sessions to see if there’s a predictable depletion. A diabetic who works out should have a convenient source of carbohydrate with them so that it can be taken right after the exercise or soon after. For hardcore weight workouts, a healthy carb source may need to be taken e Continue reading >>

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

Regaining Your Energy With Type 2 Diabetes: Tips To Prevent Fatigue

No, it's not your imagination: Taking care of yourself when you have type 2 diabetes can be exhausting. Diabetes-related fatigue is common, and you may be feeling it from a variety of sources — your type 2 diabetes symptoms themselves, exhaustion from the responsibilities of managing diabetes daily, ineffective diabetes management, or even from other underlying conditions. Understanding Diabetes-Related Fatigue There are strong associations between diabetes and testosterone levels, kidney disease, and other health complications, all of which can cause you to become very tired, says Ronald Tamler, MD, medical director of the Mount Sinai Clinical Diabetes Institute at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. There’s also a link between diabetes and depression, he adds, and depression is a common cause of extreme fatigue. According to a study published in June 2014 in the journal Current Diabetes Report, depressive symptoms affect up to one-third of people with diabetes. The research also found that depression not only impairs quality of life but also adds to the difficulties experienced in diabetes self-management. "The research highlights a wide range of potential explanations for the association between diabetes and depression, which include having a sedentary lifestyle, eating a diet high in refined sugars, sleeping poorly, and experiencing brain dysfunction due to low and high blood sugars, as well as chronic inflammation that is associated with diabetes," says David Lam, MD, associate director of the Mount Sinai Diabetes Center at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. Other causes of fatigue from diabetes include cells being deprived of sugar, high blood sugar, dehydration from increased urination, loss of calories, and sleep apnea. Graham McMahon, bachelor of med Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Lead To Fatigue And Steps To Address It

How Diabetes Can Lead To Fatigue And Steps To Address It

Patients suffering from fatigue often have a number of root causes responsible for their condition. Some are environmental; many are lifestyle-oriented; and still others are the result of various medical conditions. The sort of exhausted state that most fatigued individuals routinely find themselves can even be caused as a result of diabetes. In fact, fatigue can often be one of the earliest signs that you have what is known as prediabetes. What is Diabetes? The term Diabetes actually refers to a group of conditions that all see patients struggling with insulin. For example, in Type 1 diabetes, the body stops making insulin, as the cells of the pancreas are prevented from doing so. In Type 2 diabetes, insulin can be made, but it is either not sufficient for the body’s needs, or the body loses the ability to properly utilize it. In either case, the end result is that glucose does not get to the cells of the body as it should. That causes the glucose to remain in the blood, and leads to cell breakdown over time. The glucose in the blood, meanwhile, goes on to create havoc and damage to a number of vital systems: the nerves, the eyes, the heart, and the kidneys. Obviously, it is a condition that needs to be managed very carefully to prevent serious health complications. How Does Diabetes Cause Fatigue? Since the presence of diabetes makes the proper use of glucose all but impossible, the body has trouble receiving the fuel components it needs to make ATP in the mitochondria. The end result of all that is twofold: blood sugar levels are elevated, and the mitochondria are denied the fuel necessary to make the energy your cells need. Without that energy, your back will lack the very thing it needs to keep you alert and active. Of course, diabetes has an even far-reaching im Continue reading >>

Asknadia: Diabetes Fatigue Blood Sugars Prevent Me From Losing Weight

Asknadia: Diabetes Fatigue Blood Sugars Prevent Me From Losing Weight

Dear Nadia, In the last three weeks, my blood sugars have risen to over 200. I take Metformin twice daily and watch my food intake, I have been a type 2 for 15 years, I don’t seem to be able to lose weight, and I am tired most of the time, what can I do.I am also 75 years old. Audrey D Dear Audrey: If you have been on Metformin for 15 years and just started experiencing high blood sugars, you obviously have been doing a great job. Hyperglycemia in the last three weeks does not mean your health goals are diminishing. Some medications lose their efficacy after a period. If metformin is less effective in managing your type 2 diabetes, it does not reflect your inability to maintain normal blood sugar levels. Check in with your Physician. Your next A1C will help determine what the next course of therapy should be. Other Possible Reasons for High Blood Sugars ~ It could be that you are getting sick and your blood sugar readings are pre-paving the symptoms. High blood sugars are common when you are under the weather. Personally, I always feel lethargic before I get cold or flu symptoms. Over the years, I have learned to notice how I feel before getting sick. ~ Stress can also shoot up your blood sugars. Are there any people or new circumstances in your life that are challenging for you? ~ Are you frustrated with your blood sugars readings every day? Feeling defeated or burned out because nothing is working can add to hyperglycemia. I remember speaking to a healthcare professional who told me how one of his model patients started experience 400 blood sugar levels for one month. When the healthcare provider asked his patient “what is going on in his personal life?” The patient answered, “I am in a custody battle for my grandchild.” ~ Do you have other health conditions Continue reading >>

Chronic Fatigue, Fibromyalgia And Diabetes

Chronic Fatigue, Fibromyalgia And Diabetes

Diabetes, chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia are referred to as energy disorders. All of these health conditions are related to nerves and neuropathy. Learn more about the connection between these three disorders and what you can do about them. Small nerve neuropathy is associated with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and diabetes. Nerve damage can lead to a variety of symptoms and sensory complaints, including dizziness, dry mouth, dry eyes, nausea, constipation, diarrhea, abnormal sweating, and difficulty urinating and erectile dysfunction. People with fibromyalgia often experience pain while those with diabetes might have numbness. This nerve damage is referred to as peripheral neuropathy. Therapies are decided by your health care team based on the underlying cause of neuropathy. Beriberi is one of the diseases often associated with neuropathies. Beriberi results from a deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine). This vitamin is involved with neurological functions and glucose and metabolism functions. Inflammation is also linked with CFS, diabetes and fibromyalgia. Talk to your health care team about eating a well-balanced diet and whether nutritional supplements are recommended. When diabetes is untreated or a person does not follow the self-management plan suggested by a doctor, blood sugar levels can become too high. As a result, people feel fatigued. When insulin does not properly move glucose into your cells, people experience a lack of energy. This can lead to spectrum disorder diabetes, which may include fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue syndrome. Avoid sugary or processed foods that can cause blood sugar spikes. Test your blood sugar regularly. Take medications as directed and stay on the schedule recommended by your health care team. Diabetes, fibromya Continue reading >>

Diabetes Fatigue Symptom | Sign No 5 Of 10 Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms

Diabetes Fatigue Symptom | Sign No 5 Of 10 Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms

Diabetes Type 2 Symptoms – Feeling Fatigue, Drowsiness and Tired All the Time SHARE LINK: Diabetes type 2 symptoms like the diabetes fatigue symptom vary from person to person. But diabetes fatigue symptoms or drowsiness with a noticeable drop in energy throughout the day are common complaints of those with the diabetes fatigue sign or other diabetes type 2 symptoms. Too tired to get off the sofa at night? Does drowsiness after lunch make you feel like you need a nap in the middle of the afternoon? Insulin resistance and elevated blood sugar could be the culprits. Insulin unlocks the door to your cells allowing blood sugar to enter so it can provide fuel to power your body. Insulin resistance means your cells are having difficulty allowing blood sugar to enter. If the blood can’t enter the cells where it can be burned for energy, it builds up in the bloodstream causing elevated blood sugar. A diet rich in sweets and high-carb foods causes insulin levels to surge in an attempt to remove sugar from your bloodstream and get it to your cells for energy. This function works well unless the insulin levels spike too often from a high calorie, high carb diet. When this happens, your cells respond by decreasing the responsiveness and number of insulin receptors on their surfaces. Eventually, this prevents glucose from getting into your cells properly, leading to high blood sugar and depriving your cells of the fuel they need for energy. Maintaining normal insulin response and healthy blood sugar levels naturally involves diet and exercise to help regulate blood sugar. If you notice diabetes type 2 symptoms early while in a pre-diabetic state, prompt action and a pro-active approach could prevent the full onset of diabetes. How is Normal Tiredness Different from Diabetes Type Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fatigue

Diabetes And Fatigue

Look to the causes of fatigue to overcome this common side effect of diabetes. Fatigue is a common side effect of diabetes. But what causes fatigue and how can you overcome it? Managing diabetes can be challenging with all the tasks that you have to track such as glucose levels, carbohydrates, food portions, medication and many other tasks. This daily management of the disease can cause a person to experience fatigue. However, there could be other underlying causes of fatigue. Diabetes itself can also cause fatigue due to high or low blood glucose (sugar). High levels of glucose in the blood can slow circulation. As a result, oxygen and nutrients do not get transported efficiently to the cells and this can cause fatigue. Additionally, since glucose is a fuel for the cells, low blood sugar can also cause fatigue simply because there isn’t enough glucose or fuel for the cells. There could be other medical conditions causing fatigue such as anemia, hypothyroidism (low thyroid), and depression, to name a few. Please check with your doctor if you think that your fatigue is caused by a condition other than diabetes. To prevent diabetes-related fatigue, try to keep blood sugar levels in control, get enough sleep and try to limit stress in your life. Caffeinated beverages and energy drinks may help you deal with fatigue temporarily, but this approach is not a long-term solution and can also mask the root causes of fatigue. To understand the benefits of diabetes self-management and to enroll in a diabetes self-management workshop near you visit Michigan State University Extension. This article was published by Michigan State University Extension. For more information, visit To have a digest of information delivered straight to your email inbox, visit To contact an expert in yo Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

How To Deal With Diabetic Lethargy

Bouts of sleepiness, especially after meals, are some of the most common and disabling symptoms of diabetes. However, there are many causes of lethargy, besides diabetes. So how do you know whether you have diabetic lethargy and, if you do have it, what can you do to combat it? Many diabetics feel, at times, extremely tired, fatigued or lethargic. Having periods when you feel so exhausted that you can only prevent yourself from falling asleep with great difficulty can seriously disrupt your daily life. This tiredness can be caused by blood glucose levels that are too high or too low. But it can also be due to a dozen or so other causes such as stress, overwork, lack of a good night’s sleep and so on. The glucose-insulin system Glucose, a simple sugar, is your body’s primary source of energy. In fact, your muscle cells need glucose all the time so you can talk, walk, run, read a book, think etc. When your food is being digested, glucose is released from your stomach into your bloodstream and carried to your muscle cells. At the same time, insulin, a hormone (type of chemical), is released into your bloodstream from your pancreas. Insulin is needed to enable the glucose to enter your muscle cells. To do this, the insulin attaches itself to receptors in the surface of the cells and causes the cell membranes to allow glucose to enter. The cells then use the glucose as fuel. Of course, if the receptors in your muscle cells are blocked by fat, the insulin will not be able to open them. This is the essential problem faced by type 2 diabetics and is the reason why the only way to beat your diabetes is to eat an extremely low-fat diet designed to unblock the cell receptors. Causes of diabetic lethargy Two common reasons for tiredness or lethargy are having blood sugar levels Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes – An Overview Of Current Understanding And Management Approaches

Fatigue In Adults With Type 2 Diabetes – An Overview Of Current Understanding And Management Approaches

Patients with type 2 diabetes commonly experience fatigue, which may be incapacitating and adversely affect self-care regimens.,sup>1–7 Fatigue is a perplexing problem for healthcare providers.8 Wessely suggests that because fatigue is a non-specific and universal symptom, chronic fatigue is challenging to diagnose and treat.9 Fatigue researchers do not have a standardised definition, measurement approach, or diagnostic criteria. Diabetes-related fatigue is assumed to correlate with alterations in glucose homeostasis, but few data support this hypothesis.3,7,10,11 Fatigue in type 2 diabetes may be is associated with higher body mass index (BMI),1,7,12 the presence of co-morbid conditions,7,13 depression,7 physical inactivity,1,7,14 sleep disturbances1,15,16 and elevated cytokines.3,10 Fritschi and Quinn recently provided a detailed review of the correlates of fatigue in diabetes, including conflicting findings regarding the relationship between fatigue and glycaemic control.8 Type 2 diabetes is a disorder associated with chronic low-grade inflammation.17,18 Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance, especially among obese patients, were linked to an increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumour necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], interleukin-6 [IL-6]) from immune cells as well as increased acute phase reactants (e.g., C-reactive protein [CRP]). Pro-inflammatory cytokines and CRP were associated with high fatigue levels10,11,19,20 and depression and sleep disturbances in a variety of diseases.21–24 There is a considerable gap in the literature, however, about the treatment of fatigue secondary to type 2 diabetes. Anti-inflammatory therapies may ameliorate fatigue with type 2 diabetes. T Continue reading >>

Fatigue And Diabetes

Fatigue And Diabetes

Feeling tired all the time can greatly affect your quality of life. Once you figure out the cause, you can take steps to correct the problem and move toward feeling like yourself again. People with diabetes sometimes feel fatigued when their blood glucose level is very high or very low. You may also feel very tired when your blood glucose is going up and down a lot. The cells in your body need glucose for energy. So it makes sense that when your blood glucose is low, you don’t have enough energy for the body, so you feel fatigued. When your blood glucose level is high there is plenty of glucose, but because you have diabetes, it stays in your bloodstream and does not go into the cells where it can be used for energy. Fatigue can also be a sign of depression and is a common side effect of several medicines, such as those for high blood pressure. Monitoring Your Fatigue The first step in solving a problem is to figure out the cause. Some people make a note in their blood glucose logbook when they are feeling extra tired. Figuring out how your energy level is linked to your blood glucose levels is a good first step. The next step is to share the notes about your fatigue with your healthcare provider, who may be able to help you figure out a cause and a way to care for it. How Can I Keep From Feeling Fatigued? Keep your blood glucose in your target range. As you might expect, the first thing you can do is to keep your blood glucose at or as close to your target as you can. This will give your cells the glucose they need for energy. Eat small meals throughout the day. You may notice that you feel extra tired after a big meal, or you might even fall asleep without really trying or meaning to. Part of the reason is high blood glucose, but the other issue is that meals high i Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Every weekday, a CNNHealth expert doctor answers a viewer question. On Wednesdays, it's Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society. Asked by Mike from Tennessee Can diabetes be a (possible) cause of fatigue, leg and lower back aches? I have had bursts of energy for 10 to 15 minutes, but then need to sit for about 10 minutes, and I'm ready to go full steam again. PLEASE, Thank You, Mike Expert answer Dear Mike: Thanks for an important question, as a lot of people with diabetes complain of these symptoms. The answer is that diabetes itself probably is not the cause of your fatigue, lower back and leg aches. The things that cause type 2 diabetes (also called adult onset diabetes), such as a weight problem and lack of exercise, are commonly the cause these symptoms. Fatigue incorporates three components: 1. The inability to initiate activity. 2. Reduced ability to maintain activity. 3. Difficulty with concentration and memory. Fatigue should be distinguished from sleepiness, shortness of breath on exertion and muscle weakness, although these can also be associated with fatigue. Fatigue lasting six months or more is referred to as chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue is not necessarily the entity known as chronic fatigue syndrome, which is a diagnosis after exclusion of all other causes. Fatigue in anyone should be evaluated by a health care provider to exclude all possible causes and to get counseling on how to treat it. Other medical causes of fatigue are the side effect of drugs, thyroid dysfunction, high calcium levels, rheumatologic illnesses, adrenal, kidney or liver problems. Some infections such as tuberculosis or hepatitis can cause fatigue, and indeed, fatigue can be their only symptom. Depression is also a major cause of fatigue. While unus Continue reading >>

Fatigue In Employees With Diabetes: Its Relation With Work Characteristics And Diabetes Related Burden

Fatigue In Employees With Diabetes: Its Relation With Work Characteristics And Diabetes Related Burden

Abstract Aims: To examine the relations between work characteristics as defined by the Job Demand-Control-Support model (JDCS) (that is, job demands, decision latitude, and social support), diabetes related burden (symptoms, seriousness of disease, self care activities, and disease duration), and fatigue in employees with diabetes mellitus. Methods: Employees (n = 292) aged 30–60 years, with insulin treated diabetes, filled in self administered questionnaires that assess the above mentioned components of the JDCS model and diabetes related burdens. Results: Both work and diabetes related factors are related to fatigue in employees with diabetes. Regression analyses revealed that work characteristics explain 19.1% of the variance in fatigue; lack of support, and the interaction of job demands and job control contribute significantly. Diabetes related factors explain another 29.0% of the variance, with the focus on diabetes related symptoms and the burden of adjusting insulin dosage to circumstances. Fatigue is more severe in case of lack of social support at work, high job demands in combination with a lack of decision latitude, more burden of adjusting insulin dosage to circumstances, and more diabetic symptoms. Furthermore, regression analysis revealed that diabetic symptoms and the burden of adjusting the insulin dosage to circumstances are especially relevant in combination with high job demands. Conclusions: Both diabetes and work should be taken into consideration—by (occupational) physicians as well as supervisors—in the communication with people with diabetes. Continue reading >>

40% Of Type 1 Adults Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

40% Of Type 1 Adults Have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Tiredness can seem like a chronic condition when managing Type 1 diabetes, but a new study finds Type 1s are prone to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, as well. A new study out of Holland suggests that people with Type 1 diabetes are much more likely to suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) than the average population, and it apparently has nothing to do with fluctuating glucose levels. The study, conducted by the Expert Center for Chronic Fatigue at Radboud University in Holland, found that 4 in 10 adult study participants with Type 1 diabetes suffered from CFS, compared with fewer than 1 in 10 in the control group of adults. The study results were published this August in Diabetes Care, a scientific journal of the American Diabetes Association. The researchers emphasized that CFS onset had nothing to do with glucose levels or bouts of hypoglycemia. Researchers had a subset of 66 participants with Type 1 diabetes wear a continuous glucose monitor, and those with fewer events of hypoglycemia actually were more likely to have symptoms of CFS. While the researchers found that depression and complications from diabetes made CFS more likely among the Type 1 population in the study, it’s difficult to draw many conclusions about the possible causes of CFS among people with diabetes. First recognized as a syndrome in 1994, CFS is still poorly understood, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). CFS researchers are exploring everything from infection to stress as possible causes for the syndrome. Treatment is complex, as well, as doctors focus mainly on mitigating the symptoms of CFS in absence of a cure. According to the CDC, the fatigue of CFS is accompanied by at least 4 of 8 characteristic symptoms lasting at least 6 months. These symptoms incl Continue reading >>

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