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What Is Diabetes Comprehensive

Type 2 Diabetes Comprehensive Care 'app' 'improves Control'

Type 2 Diabetes Comprehensive Care 'app' 'improves Control'

Type 2 Diabetes Comprehensive Care 'App' 'Improves Control' A smartphone-based application for patient-centered diabetes care and management that incorporates diet, exercise, and social networking alongside glucose monitoring significantly improves type 2 diabetes control, suggest Korean research findings. Young Min Cho, MD, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, South Korea, and colleagues developed a mobile healthcare platform with an individualized diabetes management algorithm, as well as many others features typically not seen in other systems. The research, published online in Diabetes Care, shows that, compared with a paper logbook, their diabetes care platform significantly improved HbA1c levels. In addition, the system was associated with significantly more reductions in HbA1c below the 7.0% threshold compared with paper logging, crucially without patients experiencing hypoglycemia . The team also points out that patients assigned to the diabetes care platform experienced an increase in perceived overall quality of life over the course of the study. They write that, taken together, the findings show that the platform "is an efficacious and safe tool, which may improve daily management of type 2 diabetes." Twice as Many Patients Reached HbA1c < 7% With mDiabetes In recent years, tens of thousands of mobile healthcare applications or "apps" have been developed, with many designed to help patients manage type 2 diabetes. Indeed, a meta-analysis of such apps indicates that their use is associated with an average HbA1c reduction of 0.4% (PLoS One. 2016;11:e0166718 ). However, the South Korean researchers point out that varied aspects of type 2 diabetes management, such as diet, physical activity, glucose monitoring, ins Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes

Types Of Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes Previously known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, Type 1 diabetes results when the pancreatic beta cells are destroyed by the immune system. Beta cells are the only cell type in the body capable of producing insulin, so the loss means a person is no longer able to make insulin and no longer able to regulate the levels of blood sugar. These patients are dependent on insulin replacement given by injection or an insulin pump. Type 1 diabetes is the type most commonly diagnosed in children, adolescents, and young adults. Overall it accounts for approximately 5-10% of all diabetes cases. Risk factors for development of type 1 diabetes are a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Type 2 Diabetes Previously known as adult-onset diabetes or non-insulin dependent diabetes, Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease caused by a combination of insulin resistance, an inability of pancreatic beta cells to produce adequate amounts of insulin and ultimately beta cell death. This form of diabetes accounts for approximately 90-95% of the cases. It is most often observed in older adults but cases in children and young adults are increasing. The risk factors for developing type 2 diabetes include older age, obesity, family history, low physical activity, and race/ethnicity. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is a condition of high blood glucose levels, but not yet high enough for diagnosis of diabetes. These individuals are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Moderate-intensity physical activity and weight loss can delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. It is estimated that approximately 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Diabetes can also occur during pregnancy and is then ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes Care At Mayo Clinic

Diabetes Care At Mayo Clinic

Experience and expertise. Mayo Clinic doctors have expertise in treating people with all types of diabetes, including those with hard-to-control blood sugar. Each year, Mayo Clinic doctors treat nearly 47,000 people with diabetes. Education. Mayo Clinic offers a comprehensive educational program for those with type 1 or type 2 diabetes who are receiving an intensive insulin therapy — or multiple daily injection — program. The three-day educational series covers a broad range of topics, including the guidelines and principles of insulin dose adjustment on normal days, during exercise, on sick days and during special circumstances, as well as comprehensive dietary advice. Multispecialty team of experts. Mayo Clinic's team of specialists works together to create a customized treatment plan for you. Your team may include a doctor, diabetes educator and registered dietitian who will work closely with you to keep your blood sugar level as close to normal as possible. Referral and prompt access to eye, kidney and foot specialists is also readily available when needed. Newest research. A research partnership between Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota has the goal of finding optimal treatments and ultimately curing diabetes. Mayo Clinic researchers are on the forefront of diabetes research, with specialty labs exploring ways to regenerate insulin-producing cells and to monitor blood sugar and deliver the appropriate dose of insulin to people with type 1 diabetes (artificial pancreas). Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., ranks No. 1 for diabetes and endocrinology in the U.S. News & World Report Best Hospitals rankings. Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, Ariz., is ranked highly performing for diabetes and endocrinology by U.S. News & World Report. Mayo Clinic also ranks among th Continue reading >>

Diabetes (endocrinology) | University Of Miami Health System

Diabetes (endocrinology) | University Of Miami Health System

Diabetes mellitus is a disease that occurs when your blood sugar (glucose) is too high. Glucose is your body's main source of energy, which you get from the food you eat. After eating or drinking something, your body releases a hormone called insulin, which helps make the glucose available to your cells for energy. University of Miami Health System offers leading diabetes expertise from a multidisciplinary team. We develop a customized treatment plan that fits into your lifestyle, using the latest advancements in diabetes treatment including promising new treatments through clinical trials. You can depend on expert care and a full range of resources to make living with diabetes a little easier. Leading-edge care and education backed by groundbreaking diabetes research. As an academic medical center, we leverage the latest research completed by the nationally recognized Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine the largest research center thats known internationally for its research findings and isdedicated to finding a cure for diabetes. The diabetes and endocrinology clinics located in the institute offer comprehensive treatment, diabetes education classes , and clinical research opportunities for people living with diabetes. A multidisciplinary team approach. We take a team approach to help you manage diabetes and improve your health. Our endocrinologists work closely with ophthalmologists, podiatrists, kidney specialists, dietitians, nutrition educators, and other specialists to provide complete care. We help reduce your risk of developing diabetes-related health problems such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye problems, dental disease, nerve damage, and foot problems. Comprehensive care in one place. At the Comprehe Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Guidelines Address Gap In Comprehensive Care

New Diabetes Guidelines Address Gap In Comprehensive Care

New Diabetes Guidelines Address Gap in Comprehensive Care April 28, 2011 (San Diego, California) In an effort to address the dangerous comorbid conditions that often accompany diabetes, as well as the symptoms of the disease itself, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinology (AACE) has released new clinical practice guidelines that emphasize individualized, comprehensive healthcare for patients with diabetes. Until now, that comprehensive care has been a missing piece in the healthcare that patients with diabetes receive, said 2 experts here at the AACE 20th Annual Meeting and Clinical Congress. "When you look at comorbid conditions that commonly affect those with diabetes, such as heart attack, congestive heart failure, and chronic kidney disease, statistics show us that diabetic patients suffer these complications at a rate 3 to 7 times greater than those without diabetes," said Yehuda Handelsman, MD, president of AACE and medical director of the Metabolic Institute of America. Unfortunately, many patients with diabetes do not have the most common complications of the disease high lipids and high blood pressure, in addition to high blood sugar under control, Dr. Handelsman said. Only 7% to 13% of patients with diabetes in the United States have good cholesterol, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure that are under control and also take aspirin to reduce the risk for heart attack, according to Dr. Handelsman. "Diabetics are not getting comprehensive care, and with the new guidelines, we hope to address that problem," he added. "This is the first year that our guidelines have been so comprehensive," said Daniel Einhorn, MD, immediate past president of AACE and clinical professor of medicine at the University of CaliforniaSan Diego. The new guidelines address n Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Profile (comprehensive)

Diabetes Management Profile (comprehensive)

Diabetes Management Profile (Comprehensive) Captures fasting glucose, average over time, AND deadly post meal spikes! ($50.00 Premier bonus applied at checkout) You have added your selected item(s) to your cart. What do you want to do next? You will be Adding Diabetes Management Profile (Comprehensive) to the list. Glucose A snapshot of your glucose level in a fasting state. HbA1C Your average glucose over the last 2-3 months. Insulin - A hormone secreted by your pancreas in response to eating carbohydrates - in people with diabetes, insulin does not work optimally to drive glucose into the cells. As a result the pancreas produces more insulin than normal to help keep your glucose in the normal range. CBC/Chemistry Panel Evaluates liver and kidney function along with important cholesterol levels including HDL, LDL and VLDL, plus triglycerides. Diabetes tends to lower "good" cholesterol levels and raise triglyceride and "bad" cholesterol levels, which increases risk for heart disease and stroke. Magnesium Low values may contribute to insulin resistance and poor metabolic function. DHEA-S An important hormone that helps regulate blood glucose levels. Cortisol Chronically elevated levels cause your body to produce glucose and inhibit insulin leaving you in a general insulin-resistant state. C-reactive protein (high sensitivity) A marker of inflammation which increases along with blood sugar dysfunction. People with diabetes are at significant risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and the combination of diabetes and increased lipids accelerates plaque formation in the artery wall.1 You might be surprised to learn that an estimated 30.2 million people in the United States have diabetes - which is over 9% of our population! Even more startling is the fact that 7.2 millionof Continue reading >>

Comprehensive Diabetes Education And Support

Comprehensive Diabetes Education And Support

Comprehensive Diabetes Education and Support Whether you've just received a diagnosis of diabetes or have lived with diabetes for several years, UPMC can offer you care and ongoing support. Our primary care providers, specialists, and diabetes experts work together to help you stay healthy. Diabetes Self-Management Education , available at all locations of UPMC Centers for Diabetes Education and Support , is a comprehensive educational program for people with diabetes. Through the self-management program, you will be able to learn ways to manage your diabetes. The program led by a diabetes educator or dietitian covers all aspects of diabetes self-management, such as: The program also connects you with educators, health care professionals, and other people with diabetes who can become part of your support team. Browse UPMC doctors and medical professionals to find the care that's right for you. Customize your search by specialty, zip code, last name, and more. Find important information on scheduling your appointment or finding a doctor or service that meets your needs. Browse addresses and contact information for our network of hospitals, specialty care practices, and community health locations. Learn more about how to pay your UPMC bill. Find resources including payment methods and contact information for assistance. Advance your career with UPMC. Discover our latest job listings and learn about our values and career pathways. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Test Panel

Diabetes Test Panel

Direct-to-consumer lab testing; No doctor referral or insurance necessary 2,000+ conveniently located CLIA-certified U.S. labs Comprehensive and easy-to-use website About Our Diabetes Test Panel The diabetes test panel includes multiple tests relevant to diagnosing and monitoring diabetes. Diabetes is a group of diseases that result in blood sugar (glucose) levels that are too high. Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by the body failing to produce insulin. Type 2 Diabetes is characterized by failing to produce enough insulin for proper function or by the body not reacting to insulin. Approximately 90 percent of diabetes cases are Type 2. Gestational diabetes affects pregnant women. It occurs when their bodies have very high glucose levels and not enough insulin to transport it into cells. Often women with gestational diabetes have no symptoms, so testing is important if you are considered an at-risk patient. Our Diabetes Panel includes the following: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) / Glycohemoglobin - The Hemoglobin A1c (glycohemoglobin or glycated hemoglobin) test evaluates the average amount of glucose in the blood over the past 8-12 weeks. Random Microalbumin, Urine Test - Healthy kidneys filter waste and toxins from the blood and hang on to the healthy components, including proteins such as albumin. Kidney damage can cause proteins to leak through the kidneys and exit the body via urine. Albumin is one of the first proteins to leak when the kidneys become damaged. Comprehensive Metabolic Panel (CMP); 14 health tests that measure blood sugar (glucose) levels, electrolyte and fluid balance, kidney function, and liver function. Albumin - Albumin is a protein made by the liver. Measuring levels of albumin is helpful in diagnosing liver disease. An albumin test measures how well yo Continue reading >>

Comprehensive Diabetes Care (cdc)

Comprehensive Diabetes Care (cdc)

Assesses adults 1875 years of age with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) who had each of the following: HbA1c control (<7.0%) for a selected population. * *Additional exclusion criteria are required for this indicator, which will result in a different eligible population from all other indicators. This indicator is only reported for the commercial and Medicaid product lines. Diabetes is a complex group of diseases marked by high blood glucose (blood sugar) due to the bodys inability to make or use insulin. Left unmanaged, diabetes can lead to serious complications, including heart disease, stroke, hypertension, blindness, kidney disease, diseases of the nervous system, amputations and premature death.1 Proper diabetes management is essential to control blood glucose, reduce risks for complications and prolong life. With support from health care providers, patients can manage their diabetes with self-care, taking medications as instructed, eating a healthy diet, being physically active and quitting smoking.1 Continue reading >>

Comprehensive Diabetes Center - Uchicago Medicine

Comprehensive Diabetes Center - Uchicago Medicine

The University of Chicago Kovler Diabetes Center offers a patient-centered, science-based approach for managing: Monogenic diabetes , including neonatal diabetes and maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY) Our multidisciplinary team works with patients and referring physicians to address all the challenges of diabetes, from hypertension and vascular problems, to foot conditions and kidney disease. We offer second opinions and ongoing treatment for people living with diabetes. Our team integrates the latest research into clinical practice, which gives our patients access to the most advanced diagnostic and treatment services. Accredited by the American Diabetes Association, the Kovler Diabetes Center provides two service options to help people manage their diabetes: In this approach, patients benefit from a full evaluation that results in an individualized diabetes management plan that the patient follows under the care of his or her primary/referring physician. This thorough treatment plan addresses all aspects of managing the patient's diabetes and any related complications. Our team will use previous test results and may conduct additional diagnostic tests such as advanced laboratory analysis, genetic testing, or other methods of evaluation. Under this scenario, after a thorough evaluation by our team, a patient can choose to become a continuing patient at the University of Chicago Kovler Diabetes Center. Patients who come to the Diabetes Center also have access to clinical trials. The Kovler Diabetes Center is a leader in diabetes research, and is one of only seven designated National Institutes of Health Diabetes Research and Training Centers (DRTC) in the nation. The University of Chicago receives more NIH funding for diabetes and endocrinology research than a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes Mellitus: An Overview

Diabetes mellitus is a disease that prevents your body from properly using the energy from the food you eat. Diabetes occurs in one of the following situations: The pancreas (an organ behind your stomach) produces little insulin or no insulin at all. (Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone, produced by the beta cells of the pancreas, which helps the body use sugar for energy.) -Or- The pancreas makes insulin, but the insulin made does not work as it should. This condition is called insulin resistance. To better understand diabetes, it helps to know more about how the body uses food for energy (a process called metabolism). Your body is made up of millions of cells. To make energy, the cells need food in a very simple form. When you eat or drink, much of your food is broken down into a simple sugar called glucose. Glucose provides the energy your body needs for daily activities. The blood vessels and blood are the highways that transport sugar from where it is either taken in (the stomach) or manufactured (in the liver) to the cells where it is used (muscles) or where it is stored (fat). Sugar cannot go into the cells by itself. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, which serves as the helper, or the "key," that lets sugar into the cells for use as energy. When sugar leaves the bloodstream and enters the cells, the blood sugar level is lowered. Without insulin, or the "key," sugar cannot get into the body's cells for use as energy. This causes sugar to rise. Too much sugar in the blood is called "hyperglycemia" (high blood sugar) or diabetes. What are the types of diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2: Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (beta cells) are damaged. In Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Tweet Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your body either doesn't make enough insulin or can't use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugars to build up in the blood. Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and lower-extremity amputations. Diabetes is predicted by a clear set of symptoms, but it still often goes undiagnosed. The main 3 diabetes signs are: Increased thirst Increased need to urinate Increased hunger Diabetes is becoming increasingly more common throughout the world, due to increased obesity - which can lead to metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes leading to higher incidences of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is the name used to describe a metabolic condition of having higher than normal blood sugar levels. There are different reasons why people get high blood glucose levels and so a number of different types of diabetes exist. How many diabetics are there? According to the IDF, the number of diabetics in the world stands at 365 million people, representing around 8.5% of the global population. There are approximately 2.9 million diabetic people in the UK according to Diabetes UK, and there's thought to be around 500,000 people who may be diabetic but currently undiagnosed. [1] Diabetes overview Diabetes is a common hormonal problem that if untreated can lead to diabetes complications such as diabetic neuropathy, kidney problems, heart problems, retinopathy and other disorders. At advanced stages, diabetes can cause kidney failure, amputation, blindness and stroke. However, compli Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Strategies For Providing Comprehensive Care

Diabetes Mellitus: Strategies For Providing Comprehensive Care

Diabetes Mellitus: Strategies for Providing Comprehensive Care Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder that has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. The disease affects 18.2 million Americans, yet approximately one-third of these individuals remains undiagnosed. An additional 41 million individuals have prediabetes. It is estimated that one in three that were born in the year 2000 will have diabetes, and that diabetes will increase by 225% between 2000 and 2050.1,2 Diabetes is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. Among middleaged people with diabetes, life expectancy is reduced by 510 years. For the entire population with diabetes, an estimated 13 years is lost by both men and women.1 There are multiple complications associated with diabetes mellitus. In 2000, 37.2% of individuals with diabetes age 35 years and older reported receiving a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.1Heart disease and stroke are the leading cause of diabetes-related deaths in individuals with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults, and the leading cause of treated endstage renal disease. Severe forms of diabetic nerve disease are a major contributing cause of lower extremity amputations. Aggressive periodontitis is recognized as the sixth complication of diabetes.3Diabetes can cause risks of birth defects and spontaneous abortions during pregnancy. Further, individuals with diabetes are more susceptible to pneumonia and influenza. Given these statistics and complicating factors, it is incumbent upon all health care providers, including dental professionals, to be knowledgeable of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, and to participate in programs related to diabetes prevention and control. The purposes of this paper Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

We have one of the few physicians in the state to be recognized in diabetes care by the National Committee for Quality Assurance/American Diabetes Association. JacquesLaguerre, MD, Sadhana Char, MD and Roshni Patel, MD have been awarded recognition by the National Committee for Quality Assurance/American Diabetes Association Diabetes Provider Rocognition Program. This recognition is based upon the provision of comprehensive treatment for the diabetic patient, meeting the national standards for care. We utilize these standards to provide quality care. Our staff will assist you with quality management of diabetes. We will provide you the information you need to be an informed patient. Advice will be provided for regular vision checks and foot care. Laboratory testing will be performed at regular intervals to make sure you are acheiving your goals for treatment. We are available as your resource for diabetes care. We offer comprehensive education regarding diabetes, cholesterol and high blood pressure. We will tailor the information we provide to your needs, with either individual or group classes. We follow the national guidelines for the treatment of diabetes. We will select medications that lower your risk for the complications of diabetes - eye damage; kidney damage; poor circulation and heart disease. In addition to glucose control, we make sure that you also achieve treatment goals for your cholesterol and blood pressure. This combined approach for treatment lowers the chances for a heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. Once a diagnosis is made (from elevated cholesterol or blood pressure to coronary heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure or diabetes) we will assist with your disease management. We use the results of the latest research to select medicati Continue reading >>

Comprehensive Management Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Establishingpriorities Of Care.

Comprehensive Management Of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: Establishingpriorities Of Care.

1. Am J Manag Care. 2001 Aug;7(10 Suppl):S327-43; quiz S344-8. Comprehensive management of patients with type 2 diabetes: establishingpriorities of care. (1)International Diabetes Center, 3800 Park Nicollet Blvd, Minneapolis, MN 55416, USA. Type 2 diabetes is a complex metabolic disorder characterized by elevated bloodglucose levels and a marked increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD).The increased CVD risk is caused by a unique cluster of metabolic abnormalities, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia. Toreduce the risk of cardiovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes,comprehensive management of risk factors is essential. Aggressive treatment ofdyslipidemia and hypertension is known to benefit patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition, intensive glycemic control and targeted treatment of insulinresistance can further reduce the enormous burden of CVD in this high-riskpopulation. Increasing evidence suggests that insulin resistance is one of theearliest markers of risk for both CVD and diabetes, and it is known that insulin resistance alone can significantly increase the risk of CVD. Type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance are both associated with disordered lipid metabolism, manifestin elevated triglyceride levels, low levels of high-density lipoproteincholesterol, and small, dense low-density lipoprotein cholesterol particles.Patients with type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance have an increased risk ofhypertension, which further contributes to their CVD risk. Each of these factors can also contribute to the risk of microvascular disease. To ensure that patientswith type 2 diabetes receive comprehensive, high-quality care, specific standardshave been developed. These standards can help providers establ Continue reading >>

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