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What Is Diabetes Colitis?

How Do I Eat With Diabetes And Ulcerative Colitis?

How Do I Eat With Diabetes And Ulcerative Colitis?

How Do I Eat With Diabetes and Ulcerative Colitis? How do you deal with dietary requirements for managing diabetes when you are also on a diet for ulcerative colitis? This means no dairy products, no fresh fruit or vegetables, no chocolate, etc. Any ideas? Marilyn Lawrence, Woodridge, Illinois Sue Robbins, RD, CDE, responds: Ulcerative colitis is difficult to live with, especially if you have diabetes, too. Diet and lifestyle may help you control symptoms and prevent flare-ups. For starters, limit your dairy products, as you mentioned. Many people with ulcerative colitis are lactose intolerant as well. (Lactose is a sugar that is found in milk.) Cheese and yogurt are generally well tolerated because lactose is broken down in the processing. Adding a dietary supplement that helps you break down lactose is another good idea. Foods with fiber may be problematic as well. If fresh fruits and vegetables aggravate symptoms, try cooking, baking, or stewing them. You'll have to try a variety of vegetables because people vary in what their systems will tolerate. Be cautious of vegetables from the cabbage family. These include broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts, as well as cabbage. Legumes, spicy foods, alcohol, and caffeine may be irritating. You should also focus on getting adequate protein. Fat may be problematic for your ulcerative colitis, though, so focus on lean meats, like skinless chicken, fish, lean ground beef, pork tenderloin, and egg whites. Take a multivitamin to supplement your diet, too. Eating small meals may be helpful in balancing both dietary issues. And remember to drink plenty of fluids but to be careful with carbonated beverages. They may cause gas. If your diet is very limited or you are losing weight, make an appointment with a registered dietiti Continue reading >>

Colitis (symptoms, Types, And Treatments)

Colitis (symptoms, Types, And Treatments)

Colitis refers to inflammation of the inner lining of the colon. There are numerous causes of colitis including infection, inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis), ischemic colitis, allergic reactions, and microscopic colitis. Associated symptoms depend upon the cause of colitis and may include eye inflammation, joint swelling, Blood in the stool is never normal and medical care should be sought for evaluation of the cause. Depending upon the history and physical examination, further testing may be necessary to find the cause of colitis and may include blood tests (complete blood count, electrolytes, kidney function and inflammatory marker tests), urine and stool samples, colonoscopy, and barium enema. Treatment of colitis depends upon the cause, and often is focused on symptom relief, supportive care, and maintaining adequate hydration and pain control. Antibiotics may be prescribed to treat infectious causes of colitis. Some bacterial infections that cause colitis resolve without any antibiotic treatment. What's Causing Your Abdominal Pain? What are the symptoms of colitis? Colitis can be caused by infections, loss of blood supply, or chronic diseases. Despite the cause, people suffering from colitis may have typical symptoms that include abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, and diarrhea (bloody diarrhea with some types of colitis). Colitis describes inflammation of the inner lining of the colon and can be associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, bloating, and blood in the stool. This inflammation may be due to a variety of reasons, including the following: Infection Loss of blood supply to the colon (ischemia) Invasion of the colon wall with lymphocytic white blood cells or collagen The colon, or large intestine, is a hollow, muscular tube th Continue reading >>

The Real Cause Of Diabetes

The Real Cause Of Diabetes

At High Carb Health, we focus on promoting healthy eating via a low fat, whole foods plant based diet rather than drugs as a way of preventing and reversing lifestyle diseases such as Type 2 Diabetes, Hypertension, digestive disorders such as Crohns, Ulcerative Colitis, IBS/IBD and more. We are passionate about enabling people to take control of their health and fitness. Please note that whenever I mention Diabetes in this article, I am referring to Type 2. This is a topic I discussed in my talk at the Green Living Show, in Auckland at the ASB Showgrounds, the real cause of Diabetes. The most common way of looking at this disease, which is now at epidemic proportions, is to focus on the symptoms. High blood sugar has now become synonymous with Diabetes to the point that the majority of the population believes that this is the cause. This however could not be further from the truth. If sugar isn’t the cause, then how does Diabetes occur? The pancreas, an organ in your abdomen, produces insulin, which is a hormone that it sends into your bloodstream, to travel to the various cells in your body. Like a key sliding into a lock, insulin attaches to a receptor on the cells surface, which in-turn opens the door and ushers the glucose in. In Type 2 Diabetes, this system is not functioning correctly. The pancreas makes insulin, and this insulin travels to each cell, but when it arrives, it has trouble opening the door. This means that glucose cannot get into the cells and builds up in the bloodstream. There is nothing wrong with the key (insulin) and nothing wrong with the lock (cell membrane), except there is something blocking or jamming the lock. So what is it that could be jamming the lock? The substance is called intramyocellular lipid (intra – means “inside”, myo Continue reading >>

14 Foods To Avoid If You Have Ulcerative Colitis

14 Foods To Avoid If You Have Ulcerative Colitis

What not to eat Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes inflammation and ulcers in the lining of the large intestine, or colon, and rectum. It can cause pain, bloating, and diarrhea during flare-ups, and often few or no symptoms between episodes. Specific foods or eating habits don't cause ulcerative colitis, but they can make it worse. Here are some common foods that can exacerbate ulcerative colitis symptoms. Beans Legumes and beans are high in fiber and can cause gas, so they're not an ideal food for someone having an ulcerative colitis flare. "But they're still an important staple in many diets, especially for vegetarians and vegans," says Julie Cepo, a registered dietitian and coauthor of the Crohn's & Colitis Diet Guide. Try different preparations and smaller portions, says Cepo. For example, rinsing canned beans well, or removing the outer coating of chickpeas, or pureeing them into hummus can make these foods more easily tolerated. Dairy If you are lactose intolerant, eating dairy can cause IBD-like symptoms. But that doesn't mean everyone with colitis should steer clear of milk. "Most people think they are automatically lactose intolerant if they have colitis, and that's not true," says Sunanda Kane, MD, professor of gastroenterology at the Mayo Clinic, in Rochester, Minn. "Lactose intolerance has to do with how much of a specific enzyme you have. And the only way to know is if you do an experiment where you drink a glass of milk and then see if you feel worse afterward." Broccoli High-fiber, stringy vegetables like broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, and celery are not easily digested, and can cause gas, bloating, and cramping. You may be able to tolerate these foods if they're well cooked and chopped into small pieces, bu Continue reading >>

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a disease that causes inflammation and sores, called ulcers, in the lining of the rectum and colon. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. UC can happen at any age, but it usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30. It tends to run in families. The most common symptoms are pain in the abdomen and blood or pus in diarrhea. Other symptoms may include Anemia Severe tiredness Weight loss Loss of appetite Bleeding from the rectum Sores on the skin Joint pain Growth failure in children About half of people with UC have mild symptoms. Doctors use blood tests, stool tests, colonoscopy or sigmoidoscopy, and imaging tests to diagnose UC. Several types of drugs can help control it. Some people have long periods of remission, when they are free of symptoms. In severe cases, doctors must remove the colon. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diet Confilct With Ulcerative Colitis

Diet Confilct With Ulcerative Colitis

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have had Ulcerative Colitis for about, and was diagnosed with Type 2 a week ago... Due medication being ineffective for my Ulcerative Colitis solely controlled by my Diet. But now that I have been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, I have been given run down of what my Diet should be, However I am being told that the foods I should eat for Diabetes, are the same food I have been avoiding, and the food I eat to control my Ulcerative Colitis I need to avoid eating now that I am Diabetic. I can't win either way... although I can eat food like Sushi, but that a very expensive Diet option everyday So I was wondering if there are any joint sufferers like me, who could advise me... My GP is booking an appointment a dietician, but don't know when that will be... What foods do you eat for your colitis? Without any information we cannot help with diet I'll tag @Winnie53 as I believe she suffers with UC and manages to control both conditions with a LCHF diet. I've also seen a number of people post about success in controlling UC with a real food Paleo/Primal type of diet, which again can be tailored for low carb eating. Sites include Mark's Daily Apple and Robb Wolf's Paleo Solution (Robb himself is a former sufferer of UC): I tend to avoid most fruit & vegetables, wholegrain/wholemeal products, nuts & seeds, beans/pulses, artificial sweeteners... I googled that Paleo diet, but it seems to contain most of what I have been avoiding... Okay, I can eat bananas, mangos, wakame, potatoes, ginger, garlic, turmeric... when I was first diagnose with colitis, my specialist told me if I find anything that calm my bowels, then continue regardless of peer pressure.. So one o Continue reading >>

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Colorectal Cancer And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Links

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Colorectal Cancer And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: The Links

Inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and type 2 diabetes mellitus: The links The co-occurrence of the three disease entities, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), colorectal cancer (CRC), type 2diabetes mellitus (T2DM) along with inflammation and dismicrobism has been frequently reported. Some authors have even suggested that dysbiosis could be the link through a molecular crosstalk of multiple inflammatory loops including TGF, NFKB, TNF and ROS among others. This review focuses on the inflammatory process along with the role of microbiota in the pathophysiology of the three diseases. The etiology of IBD is multifactorial, and like CRC and T2DM, it is associated with a widespread and sustained GI inflammation and dismicrobism, whereby an array of pro-inflammatory mediators and other related biomolecules are up-regulated, both locally and systematically. Such a persistent or an inadequately resolved chronic inflammation may be a causative agent, in the presence other factors, leading to several pathologies such as IBD, CRC and T2DM. TGF plays a crucial role in pancreatic cell malfunctioning as glucotoxicity stimulates its signaling cascade through smad 3, IL-6 and epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Such a cascade could lead to macrophages and other cells recruitment, inflammation, then IBD and CRC. NFkB is also another key regulator in the crosstalk among the pathways leading to the three disease entities. It plays a major role in linking inflammation to cancer development through its ability to up regulate several inflammatory and tumor promoting cytokines like: IL-6, IL-1 and TNF , as well as genes like BCL2 and BCLXL. It activates JAK/STAT signaling network via STAT3 transcription factors and promotes epithelial to mesenchymal transition. It also increases t Continue reading >>

What Is Ulcerative Colitis: Symptoms, Treatment & Causes

What Is Ulcerative Colitis: Symptoms, Treatment & Causes

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is an acute or chronic inflammation of the membrane that lines the colon (the large intestine or large bowel ). The inflammation occurs in the inner most layer of the colon and may result in the formation of sores (ulcers). Ulcerative colitis rarely affects the small intestine except for the lower most section, called the terminal ileum. The inflammation makes the colon empty frequently causing diarrhea . Ulcers form in places where the inflammation has killed the cells lining the colon. The ulcers bleed and produce pus and mucus. Symptoms of ulcerative colitis include abdominal pain , diarrhea , rectal bleeding , a recurrent urge to have a bowel movement (tenesmus), lack of appetite, fever , and fatigue . Abdominal pain , diarrhea, and bloody bowel movements are the hallmark of the disease. The disease initially causes inflammation in the rectum and may gradually spread to involve the whole colon. If just the rectum is involved, it is referred to as ulcerative proctitis . Ulcerative colitis is one of the inflammatory bowel diseases ( IBD ), the other is Crohn's disease. Ulcerative colitis may be difficult to diagnose because its symptoms may mimic other intestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome . Crohn's disease differs from ulcerative colitis in several ways: it causes inflammation deeper within the intestinal wall, it may occur anywhere in the digestive tract, from the mouth to the anus, and is patchy in nature. While Crohn's disease most often occurs in the small intestine, there can be scattered lesions throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Ulcerative colitis affects only the colon and progresses proximally from the rectum in a continuous manner to potentially involve the rest of the colon. There are an estimated 1-1.3 million Continue reading >>

How To Keep Ulcerative Colitis And Diabetes In Check

How To Keep Ulcerative Colitis And Diabetes In Check

Living with two chronic illnesses like diabetes and ulcerative colitis, a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), isn’t easy. They each require treatments that can sometimes be at odds with each other. That’s why it’s essential to find strategies to manage both conditions. With type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you have high blood glucose levels because of your body's inability to properly produce or use the hormone insulin. Ulcerative colitis comes from an inflammation of the cells lining the large intestine and/or rectum. But drugs like steroids, which are used to treat symptoms of ulcerative colitis, like diarrhea, stomach pain, and inflammation, can raise blood glucose levels. Steroids can also cause people who aren’t prone to having high blood sugar to develop diabetes, according to a July 2015 study published in the World Journal of Diabetes. If you have diabetes and take steroids for ulcerative colitis, the combination can ultimately increase your risk of more serious complications, such as heart disease, nerve damage, and vision loss. When taking steroids for ulcerative colitis symptoms, experts like Sacha Uelmen, RDN, CDE, director of nutrition at the American Diabetes Association, recommend using insulin to keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Work with an endocrinologist to figure out how much insulin is needed, and keep a close eye on your blood sugar,” she says. “Once you’ve gotten the flare under control, your doctor will likely taper off the insulin, just like your gastroenterologist will taper off the steroids.” Depending on your situation, the endocrinologist or your primary care provider may use oral medications, such as metformin, instead of insulin. How Diabetes Medications Affect Ulcerative Colitis For people with ulcerative colitis, Continue reading >>

Ulcerative Colitis - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Ulcerative Colitis - Symptoms And Causes - Mayo Clinic

Read Mayo's IBD blog, discussing the latest advances in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Ulcerative colitis (UL-sur-uh-tiv koe-LIE-tis) is an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that causes long-lasting inflammation and ulcers (sores) in your digestive tract. Ulcerative colitis affects the innermost lining of your large intestine (colon) and rectum. Symptoms usually develop over time, rather than suddenly. Ulcerative colitis can be debilitating and can sometimes lead to life-threatening complications. While it has no known cure, treatment can greatly reduce signs and symptoms of the disease and even bring about long-term remission. Ulcerative colitis symptoms can vary, depending on the severity of inflammation and where it occurs. Signs and symptoms may include: Most people with ulcerative colitis have mild to moderate symptoms. The course of ulcerative colitis may vary, with some people having long periods of remission. Doctors often classify ulcerative colitis according to its location. Types of ulcerative colitis include: Ulcerative proctitis. Inflammation is confined to the area closest to the anus (rectum), and rectal bleeding may be the only sign of the disease. This form of ulcerative colitis tends to be the mildest. Proctosigmoiditis. Inflammation involves the rectum and sigmoid colon (lower end of the colon). Signs and symptoms include bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramps and pain, and an inability to move the bowels in spite of the urge to do so (tenesmus). Left-sided colitis. Inflammation extends from the rectum up through the sigmoid and descending colon. Signs and symptoms include bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and pain on the left side, and unintended weight loss. Pancolitis. Pancolitis often affects the entire colon and causes bouts of bloody diarr Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Ulcerative Colitis

Type 1 Diabetes And Ulcerative Colitis

Im actually writing this introduction a few months after I began this blog post. Its been a fairly tough time of it, as youll read on in a minute. The beginning is fairly difficult, very down and negative and unlike most of what I write on here but I wanted to be honest. To show that life isnt all motivation and trying to be positive. That its okay to be angry and annoyed and to show the hard parts of living with a health disorder/condition/disease, etc. Anyway I hope you can relate to this in some way and enjoy my ramblings! I guess thats the over-riding emotion Im currently feeling. Im writing this the day Ive been diagnosed, again, but Ill probably publish this sometime later on in the year. I guess I just wanted to get my initial thoughts and emotions down on paper (figuratively) before they go away. I feel honesty and transparency here are really important. Especially as I wasnt blogging when I was diagnosed with type 1. This morning Ive been re-diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC hereon out). Yet another condition. Like type 1 diabetes isnt enough, this nasty little disease/condition (whatever) has come back after 5 1/2 years to rear its ugly head and bite me in the ass. And again, its another condition that noone is sure where it comes from. Just like type 1 diabetes. And again, its another dose of lifelong medication. Just like type 1 diabetes. Blergh. Sorry, but blergh. Im going to have a day of feeling sorry for myself. The annoying thing is I really look after myself. I exercise, eat well, sleep well, manage my stress, dont drink an awful lot of alcohol, have never smoked, never done illegal drugs. And yet I have two auto-immune conditions/diseases/ (insert choice of word here). Okay, Ive slept on it. I had my day of self-pitying and being annoyed at life. Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes A Common Feature Of Ulcerative Colitis?

Is Diabetes A Common Feature Of Ulcerative Colitis?

Answered by: Dr Irwin Ziment | Professor of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), USA Q: My father is a patient of ulcerative colitis since last 10 years; he is 60. Recently he underwent colonoscopy and at present is taking Mesacol 2x3, Mebaspa 1x2 and Folvite. Earlier he was detected to have steroid-induced blood sugar but it did not disturb him and the medicine for it was not required. The last wysolone course he took was in Feb this year. But earlier, he used to take it regularly. For last some days he was experiencing weakness and uneasiness so a fasting blood sugar was done which showed 265 mg/dl and he was prescribed Pyricontin, Diacobal-1.5 mg, Semi-Daonil(2.5 mg) and Shelcal 500 mg. I want to know if diabetes is a common feature of ulcerative colitis and what would be the further implications? Will it have any adverse effect? A:Ulcerative colitis does not cause diabetes, but the latter is so common that diabetes can occur co-incidentally. Steroid therapy can make hidden diabetes become evident, and will make the diabetes more difficult to control. By managing each disease carefully, both disorders can be adequately controlled. Adequate exercise and rest, and careful dietary regulation are important for maximal control of each disorder, and minimizing stress is very desirable if possible. Frequent medical check-ups are necessary, as are good hygiene and appropriate family support to ensure regular dietary intake, etc. Continue reading >>

Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes And Ulcerative Colitis?

Connection Between Type 1 Diabetes And Ulcerative Colitis?

New review of the pathogenetic and therapeutic implications shows that both diseases share similar complications…. Patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) are usually prescribed corticosteroids to manage the inflammation associated with the disease, but when the patient has type 1 diabetes, it becomes even more difficult to manage both diseases simultaneously. Researchers have found type 1 diabetes is one of the top 3 common comorbidities a patient with UC will develop. Because the optimal treatment for UC includes corticosteroid which can increase blood glucose levels, there may be an increased risk of diabetes developing. The association between the two diseases is currently still unknown. Both UC and diabetes share similar complications including neuropathy, venous thrombosis, osteoporosis and many others. Patients diagnosed with both diseases should be monitored even more closely for hyperglycemia, dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. There are currently no alternative therapies to corticosteroids available for the treatment of serious active UC symptoms, but there are alternatives available for mild to moderate UC symptoms. To prevent any serious complications caused by hyperglycemia in mild to moderate conditions, topical mesalazine can be used. There may be a genetic linkage between the two diseases but more research is needed. Practice Pearls: Managing both ulcerative colitis and type 1 diabetes simultaneously can be very difficult to achieve because the preferred treatment for UC is corticosteroids which can raise blood sugar levels. Both disease states have similar complications including neuropathy, venous thrombosis, osteoporosis, and post operative complications. Researchers believe there is a genetic linkage between the two diseases, but more research is Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance And Diabetes Mellitus In Ulcerative Colitis: Pathogenetic And Therapeutic Implications

Glucose Intolerance And Diabetes Mellitus In Ulcerative Colitis: Pathogenetic And Therapeutic Implications

Go to: INTRODUCTION Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic disease characterised by mucosal inflammation, limited to the colon. Its incidence and prevalence are increasing with time in different regions around the world, with the highest annual incidence of 24.3 per 100000 persons-year, and prevalence of 505 per 100000 persons in Europe[1]. The disease is associated with high costs, disease-specific morbidity and decreased quality of life, mostly related to complications, surgery and co-morbid diseases. Co-morbid diseases in UC include several immune mediated diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, lupus, psoriasis, hypothyroidism and diabetes mellitus[2-7]. Among these diseases, diabetes mellitus is the most frequent condition and its association with UC has epidemiological, pathogenetic, clinical and therapeutic implications. All these points represent the objects of the present review. An electronic literature search was conducted using PubMed and Medline as primary sources. No time limits were specified up to the date of the search (September 2013). A comprehensive search was performed using the following search terms: “ulcerative colitis” or “inflammatory bowel diseases” and “diabetes mellitus” or “glucose intolerance”. The search was restricted to articles involving humans and those in the English language (or with an English abstract) and following identification of relevant titles, the abstracts of these articles were read to decide if the study was eligible. The full text article was retrieved when the title and/or abstract seemed to meet the pre-defined eligibility criteria. A manual cross-reference search of bibliographies was carried out to identify articles missed in the computerised search. Continue reading >>

Ulcerative Colitis | Takeda Canada

Ulcerative Colitis | Takeda Canada

Crohn's Disease Gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD, heartburn) Gout Multiple Myeloma Type 2 Diabetes Ulcerative Colitis Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis are diseases that inflame the lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and disrupt the bodys ability to digest food, absorb nutrition and eliminate waste in a healthy manner. They are the most common forms of a group of conditions that are collectively referred to as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and affect in in every 150 Canadians. Ulcerative colitis typically affects colon (large intestine), including the rectum and anus and inflames only the innermost lining of bowel tissue. It almost always starts at the rectum, extending upwards in a continuous manner through the colon. People with ulcerative colitis experience severe and bloody diarrhea, false urges to have a bowel movement, abdominal pain and cramping, nausea and vomiting, decreased appetite, weight loss, mild fever, anemia and loss of body fluids. Ulcerative colitis can be controlled with medication and in severe cases, surgical removal of the colon as a treatment for the disease may be recommended. This information from Crohns and Colitis Canada is available here . Continue reading >>

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