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What Is Basal Activity?

Evidence That Basal Activity, But Not Transactivation, Of The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Is Required For Insulin-like Growth Factor I-induced Activation Of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase In Oral Carcinoma Cells

Evidence That Basal Activity, But Not Transactivation, Of The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Is Required For Insulin-like Growth Factor I-induced Activation Of Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase In Oral Carcinoma Cells

Evidence that Basal Activity, But Not Transactivation, of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for Insulin-like Growth Factor I-Induced Activation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase in Oral Carcinoma Cells Molecular Diagnosis and Therapeutics (A.K., K.K., M.M.), Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (A.K., T.K.), Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Molecular Diagnosis and Therapeutics (A.K., K.K., M.M.), Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology (A.K., T.K.), Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan Search for other works by this author on: Molecular Diagnosis and Therapeutics (A.K., K.K., M.M.), Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Dr. Masahiko Miura, Molecular Diagnosis and Therapeutics, Department of Oral Restitution, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8549, Japan. Search for other works by this author on: Endocrinology, Volume 145, Issue 11, 1 November 2004, Pages 49764984, Ami Kuribayashi, Keiko Kataoka, Tohru Kurabayashi, Masahiko Miura; Evidence that Basal Activity, But Not Transactivation, of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for Insulin-like Growth Factor I-Induced Activation of Extracellular Signal Continue reading >>

Basal Rate

Basal Rate

In biology, basal rate is the rate of continuous supply of some chemical or process. In the case of diabetes mellitus, it is a low rate of continuous insulin supply needed for such purposes as controlling cellular glucose and amino acid uptake. Together with a bolus of insulin, the basal insulin completes the total insulin needs of an insulin-dependent person. An insulin pump and wristop controller is one way to arrange for a closely controlled basal insulin rate. The slow-release insulins (e.g., Lantus and Levemir) can provide a similar effect. In healthy individuals, basal rate is monitored by the pancreas, which provides a regular amount of insulin at all times. The body requires this flow of insulin to enable the body to utilize glucose in the blood stream, so the energy in glucose can be used to carry out bodily functions. Basal rate requirements can differ for individuals depending on the activities they will carry out on that particular day. For example, if one is not highly active on a certain day, they will have a decreased basal rate because they are not using a lot of energy. On the other hand, basal rate increases dramatically when an individual is highly active.[1] Basal rates often even vary from hour to hour throughout the day. For example, one’s insulin needs vary from activity to activity. Activities, such as sports, housework, shopping, gardening, tidying the house, and consuming alcohol all require a lowering in basal rate. These activities all require energy and, thus, use glucose; basal rate must decrease in order to keep glucose levels high enough to be used as fuel for the body. On the other hand, fevers, having a cold, taking a nap, taking cortisone-containing medication, and moments of excitement call for different basal rate needs. In these i Continue reading >>

What Is Basal Activity? | Yahoo Answers

What Is Basal Activity? | Yahoo Answers

i need to know for some homework im doing Update: sorry i asked that wrong i meant like how would i find out mine and i don't just want some bmr calculater of the internet. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: It would be the activity of your body at rest as is breathing, kidney function, heart rate etc. Sleeping is basal activity. look up basal activity and read about BMR i need to know for some homework im doing Source(s): basal activity: that totally depends on what class you are in it could mean appetite suppressor I think this question violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this question violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this answer violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this answer violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringed and would like to file a complaint, please see our Copyright/IP Policy I think this comment violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this comment violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors, violence or threats, harassment or privacy invasion, impersonation or misrepresentation, fraud or phishing, show more If you believe your intellectual property has been infringe Continue reading >>

Origin Of Basal Activity In Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

Origin Of Basal Activity In Mammalian Olfactory Receptor Neurons.

J Gen Physiol. 2010 Nov;136(5):529-40. doi: 10.1085/jgp.201010528. Origin of basal activity in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons. Monell Chemical Senses Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. [email protected] Mammalian odorant receptors form a large, diverse group of G protein-coupled receptors that determine the sensitivity and response profile of olfactory receptor neurons. But little is known if odorant receptors control basal and also stimulus-induced cellular properties of olfactory receptor neurons other than ligand specificity. This study demonstrates that different odorant receptors have varying degrees of basal activity, which drives concomitant receptor current fluctuations and basal action potential firing. This basal activity can be suppressed by odorants functioning as inverse agonists. Furthermore, odorant-stimulated olfactory receptor neurons expressing different odorant receptors can have strikingly different response patterns in the later phases of prolonged stimulation. Thus, the influence of odorant receptor choice on response characteristics is much more complex than previously thought, which has important consequences on odor coding and odor information transfer to the brain. Images from this publication. See all images (6) Free text Basal action potential activity in olfactory receptor neurons. AC show responses from isolated ORNs expressing the identified odorant receptors mOR-EG, M71, and I7 stimulated with their respective ligands eugenol, acetophenone, and heptanal. (DF) Recordings in the absence of stimulation to monitor basal spike firing activity, same three cells as above. Red, low-pass (50 Hz) filtered recordings to display the underlying fluctuations of the receptor current. The Ca2+-activated Cl channel blocker niflumic acid (300 M, Continue reading >>

Structural Basis For Basal Activity And Autoactivation Of Abscisic Acid (aba) Signaling Snrk2 Kinases.

Structural Basis For Basal Activity And Autoactivation Of Abscisic Acid (aba) Signaling Snrk2 Kinases.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2011 Dec 27;108(52):21259-64. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1118651109. Epub 2011 Dec 12. Structural basis for basal activity and autoactivation of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling SnRK2 kinases. Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA. Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone that controls plant growth, development, and responses to abiotic stresses. Central for ABA signaling is the ABA-mediated autoactivation of three monomeric Snf1-related kinases (SnRK2.2, -2.3, and -2.6). In the absence of ABA, SnRK2s are kept in an inactive state by forming physical complexes with type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs). Upon relief of this inhibition, SnRK2 kinases can autoactivate through unknown mechanisms. Here, we report the crystal structures of full-length Arabidopsis thaliana SnRK2.3 and SnRK2.6 at 1.9- and 2.3- resolution, respectively. The structures, in combination with biochemical studies, reveal a two-step mechanism of intramolecular kinase activation that resembles the intermolecular activation of cyclin-dependent kinases. First, release of inhibition by PP2C allows the SnRK2s to become partially active because of an intramolecular stabilization of the catalytic domain by a conserved helix in the kinase regulatory domain. This stabilization enables SnRK2s to gain full activity by activation loop autophosphorylation. Autophosphorylation is more efficient in SnRK2.6, which has higher stability than SnRK2.3 and has well-structured activation loop phosphate acceptor sites that are positioned next to the catalytic site. Together, these data provide a structural framework that links ABA-mediated release of PP2C inhibition to activation of SnRK2 kinases. Images from this publication. See all images (5) Free te Continue reading >>

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