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The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

Not all red meat is created equal – some isn’t even good enough to even be considered food. Yet when a news article talks about red meat being bad for you, you can bet the author (or the study behind the news) failed to distinguish between processed meat and unprocessed meat, as well as overcooked meat and properly cooked meat. That’s not even considering grass-fed meat vs. industrial meat, which I’ve blogged about extensively. “Red-meat-is-bad” articles don’t always deserve a rebuttal because *most* red meat actually is bad for you. However, it’s a major mistake to say all red meat is bad for you. This post serves to confront misleading headlines about red meat and diabetes risk. Let’s ask a few questions, see what the science actually says, and talk about the Bulletproof recommendations. Processed meats like hot dogs, bologna, deli meats etc. contain high omega-6’s, often have mold toxins called mycotoxins, and nitrates that can combine with bad gut bacteria. All of these can be correlated with an increased risk of diabetes. Instead, insist on eating grass fed, low toxin meat to promote good health and optimize performance. Research Doesn’t Distinguish Between Processed Red Meat and Unprocessed Red Meat When articles suggest red meat causes chronic diseases like diabetes, you would expect a high degree of specificity and accuracy. Unfortunately all you get are alarming headlines and half-truths. When you see blog posts like “Hot Dogs, Bacon and Red Meat Tied to Increased Diabetes Risk,” you should ask yourself how the authors justify lumping hot dogs (a blend of soy, wheat, MSG, and cast off animal parts) in with meat and what the study design looked like. Of course, the recent news about diabetes referenced a study that did not distinguish h Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid For People With Diabetes

Foods To Avoid For People With Diabetes

Taking control of what foods they eat not only helps people manage their diabetes but also influences how well they feel and how much energy they have every day. We take a look at what foods people with diabetes should avoid and outline what they should eat instead. Foods to avoid with diabetes Having diabetes does not have to stop people from eating the foods they enjoy. However, it does mean that they should eat smaller portions, less often. The Institute of Medicine recommend that carbohydrate intake for most people should be between 45-65 percent of total calories. This higher carbohydrate intake is consistent with plant-based diets, which have shown benefit for diabetes management in well-designed, long-term studies. However, some research has shown that people can improve their blood sugar levels when their carbohydrate intake is between 5-35 percent of calories. Much of the research comes from short-term studies for higher-fat diets, such as the ketogenic diet and Mediterranean diets. Experts are just beginning to understand the influence that the gut bacteria have on health. What is known is that high-fiber carbohydrates feed gut bacteria while a high-fat, low-carb diet often results in gut bacteria death. This is far from ideal as people with diabetes already have lower levels of gut bacteria. Populations around the world that live the longest, known as Blue Zones, all eat a plant-based diet, rich in whole foods and carbohydrates. The key to eating well with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthful foods from each of the food groups. Foods to avoid within the major food groups and suggested replacements are listed below. Grains All grains are starches. Avoiding refined grains is a smart choice for people with diabetes, regardless of chosen diet, as they affect Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes And How Serious Is It?

What Is Diabetes And How Serious Is It?

Learning to control diabetes starts with finding out as much as possible about the disease and how serious it is. That will help reduce stress when making lifestyle changes necessary to stay in good health. Step 1: Learn About Diabetes Diabetes means that your blood glucose (blood sugar) is too high. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes — the body does not make insulin. Insulin helps the body use glucose from food for energy. People with type 1 need to take insulin every day. Type 2 diabetes — the body does not make or use insulin well. People with type 2 often need to take pills or insulin. Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes. Gestational diabetes — occurs in some women when they become pregnant. It raises her future risk of developing diabetes, mostly type 2. It may raise her child’s risk of being overweight and developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes is serious. You may have heard people say they have “a touch of diabetes” or that their “sugar is a little high.” These words suggest that diabetes is not a serious disease. That is not correct. Diabetes is serious, but you can learn to manage it! It’s not easy, but it’s worth it! All people with diabetes need to make healthy food choices, stay at a healthy weight and move more every day. Taking good care of yourself and your diabetes can help you feel better. It may help you avoid health problems caused by diabetes, like: Heart attack and stroke. Eye problems that can lead to trouble seeing or going blind. Nerve damage that can cause your hands and feet to hurt, tingle, or feel numb. Some people may even lose a foot or a leg. Kidney problems that can cause your kidneys to stop working. Gum disease and loss of teeth. When your blood glucose is close to normal you are likely to: Ha Continue reading >>

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

10 Worst Foods For Your Blood Sugar

Certain foods can send your blood sugar level on a roller coaster, with insulin rushing to keep up. The good news is, while there are some surprises, most of these foods fall under the same category: processed food, such as white flour and sugar. "Refined flours and sugar cause huge spikes in insulin and get absorbed quickly, which causes problems," says Mark Hyman,… Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

50 Worst Foods For Diabetes

50 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Controlling your diabetes requires a careful balance of lifestyle habits, including eating right, exercising, and taking your proper medication. But it can be tricky to navigate proper nutrition, especially with foods that sound healthy but can actually wreak havoc on your blood sugar and overall health. In fact, diabetics are two to four times more likely than people without diabetes to die of heart disease or experience a life-threatening stroke, according to the American Heart Association. It’s even more dangerous for those who don’t control their diabetes; it can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, and kidney disease. To stay on track, be sure to avoid these 50 foods that will spike your blood sugar and lead to chronic inflammation. Luckily, life with diabetes doesn’t have to be flavor free. “After working with thousands of diabetic individuals over the years, I noticed that many asked me the same question at their first appointment. ‘Can I still eat my favorite foods?’” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, author of Eat What You Love Diabetes Cookbook. “And the answer from me was always ‘Yes!’ It’s the portion sizes and frequency that makes the most difference, in addition to how the food is prepared.” As always, be sure to consult with your doctor, registered dietitian, or certified diabetes educator before making any drastic changes to your diet. Some of these recommendations may change if you are suffering from low blood sugar. If you’re looking for what you can enjoy, be sure to stock up on the 50 Best Foods for Diabetes. Sure, it seems healthy, but a pulverized, low-fiber smoothie made primarily of fruit isn’t the best bet for those with diabetes. “Smoothies can be large whacks of carbs and sugar, especially if there’s no protein or heal Continue reading >>

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is A Serious Illness

Diabetes Is A Serious Illness

Sorting facts from fiction is important About one in seven U.S. adults has diabetes now, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. But by 2050, that rate could skyrocket to as many as one in three. Many of us don’t understand diabetes. To help contain this leading cause of disability and death, it’s important to separate fact from fiction. FICTION: Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. FACT: Many factors lead to the development of diabetes. Genetics, nutrition, exercise and lifestyle all play a role. Sugar may contribute to type 2 diabetes if it leads to weight gain, but it doesn’t cause the disease. “A diet high in calories — whether they’re from sugar or fat — raises your risk for type 2 diabetes,” said Mounaf Alsamman, MD, a family medicine doctor with Allina Medical Clinic – Brooklyn Park. “In this disease, your pancreas makes little or no insulin or your body’s cells don’t use it well. As a result, blood sugar can’t move from your bloodstream into the cells that need it for energy.” Alsamman tells his patients that sugar does not cause diabetes but it still needs to be monitored or reduced. “You just have to make sure to build your sweet treats into a healthy eating and exercise plan,” he explained. A healthful, balanced diet as well as regular exercise and maintaining a healthy weight can help prevent diabetes. Go for gradual, achievable changes to your sugar intake, such as cutting back on sweetened beverages. FICTION: Only people who weigh far too much will develop type 2 diabetes. FACT: People of all ages and body types can develop type 2 diabetes. Being overweight is just one of the risk factors. Many people with type 2 diabetes are at a healthy weight or just moderately overweight. Excess weight increases yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Does White Rice Affect Diabetes?

Does White Rice Affect Diabetes?

Most people with diabetes keep an eye on their sugar intake, but starches from white rice, potatoes and even whole grains can also raise blood sugar levels. Getting just the right amount of carbohydrates in your diet is key to maintaining good blood sugar control to stay healthy with diabetes and prevent long-term complications. A cup of white rice contains around 53 grams of carbohydrates. By comparison, a slice of bread has around 15 grams of carbohydrates, which means that a cup of white rice is the equivalent of three and a half slices of bread. Brown rice has a similarly high carb content, with 46 grams per serving, or the equivalent of roughly three slices of bread. The amount of rice served with dishes like Asian stir-fries or as a side dish with Greek kebabs, for example, may be as much as 3 cups; this corresponds to a very large amount of carbs at once and can definitely affect your blood sugar. Glycemic Index Comparing the glycemic index of different carbohydrates can help you understand how quickly they can raise your blood sugar levels. Foods with a high glycemic index of 70 and above cause your blood sugar levels to peak within a short period of time, which is damaging for your blood vessels and nerves and can, over time, contribute to heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and stroke. Foods with a medium or low glycemic index, below 69 and below 55, respectively, are better options for diabetics. White rice typically has a glycemic index between 72 and 83, while the glycemic index of brown rice varies between 48 and 62. Best White Rice Choices If you enjoy the taste of white rice, white basmati and Moolgiri rice are better options for you because of their lower glycemic index rating, usually in the 50s. If you can't find these more exotic varieties, you Continue reading >>

9 Of The Worst Eating Habits For Diabetes

9 Of The Worst Eating Habits For Diabetes

You’re a breakfast skipper istock/ShotShare We always hear that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, but this may be particularly true for individuals with diabetes, says Alison Massey, RD, a registered dietitian and director of diabetes education at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Waiting too long to eat in the morning might result in hypoglycemia or blood glucose that is too low. Here are tricks to treat hypoglycemia every diabetic should know. “Even when my clients aren’t typical ‘breakfast eaters,’ I encourage them to incorporate a small snack into their morning routine, like a Greek yogurt with some berries or a hard-boiled egg and slice of whole grain toast,” she says. It doesn’t have to be a sit-down meal, but make sure you have something healthy in your body so you don’t crash. Follow these healthy breakfast rules for diabetics. istock/GMVozd Research suggests that excessive fat intake (more than 30 percent of total calories) may worsen insulin resistance. Stay away from meals that tend to contain high amounts of saturated fat, like those from fast food restaurants. While the mechanism isn’t clearly understood, some research has found a modest benefit in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) on insulin resistance, as well as decreasing liver fat. MUFAs are good-for-you fats found in avocados, olive oil, nut butters, and seeds, to name a few. A diet that is high in MUFAs and lower in saturated fats is also associated with improvements in cardiovascular health, lower LDL cholesterol, and reduced triglycerides and blood pressure, says Massey. Here are clear signs you aren't eating enough healthy fats. From Merrill Lynch istock/alle12 Overindulging in protein could impact your blood glucose levels, especially if that protein Continue reading >>

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Which Is Worse: Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Late Update: To be completely clear, the goal of this post is to point out how unproductive this question is. It comes up from time to time in the forums, but only leads to division. We all, regardless of type, have plenty to share with each other. Now, on to the original article. On our Facebook page, we discussed the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In the process, some type 1s and type 2s both suggested that they had it worse. Before we look at this question, let’s review the difference between the two types. The Difference Between Type 1 & Type 2 Imagine insulin is the key that opens your cells and lets sugar enter. If sugar can’t enter, it builds up in the blood, makes you hungry and thirsty, and causes your body to turn to fat for energy. The symptoms of diabetes. In type 1, your pancreas stops making keys. You need to put keys in your body (i.e. inject insulin) or sugar can’t get into your cells. In type 2 diabetes, the keyhole is rusty. You have keys, but they have trouble opening the cells. You either need more keys or a way to make the lock work better. You can take a little rust off the lock by exercising, losing weight, or taking medication. This is an imperfect analogy, but hopefully it highlights the basic difference. So Which Type Is Worse? This is a maddening question. Every person is unique, and neither type is a cake walk! Type 1s need insulin to live – but type 2s can require enormous amounts of insulin as their resistance to it increases and their insulin production declines. Type 2s can walk around undiagnosed for 5 years and have complications when diagnosed. People with type 1 usually get diagnosed quickly and can take immediate action. But don’t type 1s live with diabetes for a longer period of time? Not always! Some type Continue reading >>

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Nhs Diet Advice For Diabetes

Tweet In the UK, current 2016 NHS diabetes diet advice is that there is no special diet for people with diabetes. Many people with diabetes focus on the carbohydrate content of their meals and prefer a low-carb diet for tight blood glucose level control. The NHS (and Diabetes UK) recommend a healthy, balanced diet that is low in fat, sugar and salt and contain a high level of fresh fruit and vegetables. This guide reviews the diet advice the NHS gives to people with diabetes and discusses to what degree the advice is sensible. What does the NHS advise? The NHS provides the following diet advice for people with diabetes: [147] [148] Eat plenty of starchy carbohydrates with a low glycemic index (low GI) Increase the amount of fibre in your diet Eat plenty of fruit and vegetables - at least 5 portions per day Cut down on fat and saturated fat in particular Choose foods with unsaturated fat instead - such as vegetable oils, reduced fat spreads, oily fish and avocados Choose low-fat dairy products Choose lean meat - such as skinless chicken Avoid fatty or processed meat Eat fish at least twice a week and ensure you have oily fish at least once a week Eggs and beans are other good sources of protein Cook food by grilling, baking, poaching or steaming instead of frying or roasting Avoid fatty or sugary snacks - such as crisps, cakes, biscuits and pastries Eat snacks such as fruit, unsalted nuts and low-fat yoghurts Cut down on sugar Eat less salt - have less than 6g of salt (2.4g of sodium) per day Cut down on alcohol Don’t skip breakfast Keep hydrated - aim to drink between 1.6 and 2 litres of fluid each day Is the NHS advice sensible? Whilst a number of these points are undoubtedly sensible, some of the recommendations have been criticised by patients and some leading UK h Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

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