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What Is An Elevated A1c?

Bringing Down Your Blood Sugar Levels: Why It's Important

Bringing Down Your Blood Sugar Levels: Why It's Important

Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% 0:00 Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Caption Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaque Font Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400% Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadow Font FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall Caps DefaultsDone If you suffer from a form of diabetes requiring daily injections of the hormone insulin as well as multiple daily blood sugar checks, it's important to know how to bring down blood sugar levels. Michael Heile MD, a family medicine doctor with The Family Medical Group, tells Local 12's Liz Bonis that those daily checks are critical to knowing how what you're eating balances with medication. But, you also need to know a number called your hemoglobin A1c. Dr. Heile says a hemoglobin A1c test is most accurate when taken as part of a blood draw and normal levels are critical to immediate good health for most people. “It tells us what their average blood sugar is for the last two to three months," Dr. Heile explains. Normal levels are usually under 5.7, but many people who do not have diabetes are in the 4s. Why Should I L Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c Testing

Hemoglobin A1c Testing

Description of the test Diabetes causes uncontrolled high blood glucose (sugar). Monitoring blood glucose every day is an important step to managing blood sugar. Another test used to assess blood sugar control is the hemoglobin A1C test. This test measures how much glycosylated hemoglobin (also called hemoglobin A1C) is in the blood. Hemoglobin A1C is formed when blood sugar sticks to hemoglobin of red blood cells. As blood sugar levels rise, so do levels of hemoglobin A1C. Since red blood cells live for about 3 months, the hemoglobin A1C level indicates how well blood sugar has been controlled over the last 3 months. How often should the test be performed? Hemoglobin A1C should be measured at least twice a year if you have diabetes. However, if your blood sugar is high or your diabetes medication regimen is changed, your doctor may want to measure the hemoglobin A1C more frequently (every 3 months) until your blood sugar returns to an acceptable range. Why is this test performed? The hemoglobin A1C is an accurate way to measure how well your diabetes treatment plan is working. It provides information about the average glucose level in your blood over the last 3 months, and it does not show daily fluctuations. When blood sugars are consistently high over time, the hemoglobin A1C will also be high. When hemoglobin A1C is high, changes to your medication or lifestyle (exercise or diet) are needed. Are there any risks and precautions? Although the hemoglobin A1C is considered safe, it does have some risk of side effects or complications. Though rare, the side effects or complications may include: infection (if the area is not properly sterilized before the sample is taken) excess bleeding from the puncture bruising where the needle was inserted lightheadedness or fainting Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

The Normal A1c Level

The Normal A1c Level

Wow Richard, 70 lbs? I have lost 24 lbs from low carb diet due to SIBO. It also helped my AC1 go down three points from 6.2 and my cholesterol is lower, which surprised me. I can’t afford to lose anymore weight because I was small to begin with. I had noticed much bigger people in the UK over the last 5 years compared to 15-20. Was quite shocking. I thought we had the patent on obesity! I am not diabetic that I know of but I had weird symptoms… Thirst that continued all day and night. My husband called me a camel. Dry eyes, rashes, strange dark discolouration on arm, under the arm to the side, some circulation issues and blurred vision. Eye specialist could not figure out why. Sores in the mouth also. I had observed about three weeks into super low carbs (30 Gms carb/day) that athlete’s foot symptom, sores in mouth and rashes were clearing up. So, lowering carbs for SIBO actually turned out for the best. By the way, I love your final paragraph. Research is what led me to SIBO diagnosis, and I then told the GI what to look for! He was barking up the wrong tree for months. Said I needed to eat more carbs so I don’t lose weight. Well, carbs fed the bacterial overgrowth!!! Dang fool. On Saturday, June 23, 2012, Diabetes Developments wrote: There is a new comment on the post “The Normal A1C Level”. Author: Richard Comment: I think part of the problem is that doctors are trained over many years to treat with pills, not with food. We continue to do what we are trained to do no matter what. I do believe they want to help us but don’t have the nutritional knowledge because that is not their expertise. When you have a hammer, etc. Nutritionist are no better unless they are those involved in research. They just peddle the messages they are told to. Then again, why wo Continue reading >>

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

Hemoglobin A1c (hba1c) Test For Diabetes

The hemoglobin A1c test tells you your average level of blood sugar over the past 2 to 3 months. It's also called HbA1c, glycated hemoglobin test, and glycohemoglobin. People who have diabetes need this test regularly to see if their levels are staying within range. It can tell if you need to adjust your diabetes medicines. The A1c test is also used to diagnose diabetes. Hemoglobin is a protein found in red blood cells. It gives blood its red color, and it’s job is to carry oxygen throughout your body. The sugar in your blood is called glucose. When glucose builds up in your blood, it binds to the hemoglobin in your red blood cells. The A1c test measures how much glucose is bound. Red blood cells live for about 3 months, so the test shows the average level of glucose in your blood for the past 3 months. If your glucose levels have been high over recent weeks, your hemoglobin A1c test will be higher. For people without diabetes, the normal range for the hemoglobin A1c level is between 4% and 5.6%. Hemoglobin A1c levels between 5.7% and 6.4% mean you have a higher change of getting of diabetes. Levels of 6.5% or higher mean you have diabetes. The target A1c level for people with diabetes is usually less than 7%. The higher the hemoglobin A1c, the higher your risk of having complications related to diabetes. A combination of diet, exercise, and medication can bring your levels down. People with diabetes should have an A1c test every 3 months to make sure their blood sugar is in their target range. If your diabetes is under good control, you may be able to wait longer between the blood tests. But experts recommend checking at least two times a year. People with diseases affecting hemoglobin, such as anemia, may get misleading results with this test. Other things that can Continue reading >>

What Is A Hemoglobin A1c Test?

What Is A Hemoglobin A1c Test?

A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken from the body to be tested in a lab. Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can help them detect problems like a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can help them see how well an organ (such as the liver or kidneys) is working. A hemoglobin A1c test measures how well controlled glucose levels have been for the last 3 months. Glucose is a type of sugar used by the body for energy. Glucose levels and hemoglobin A1c levels can be high if diabetes is not well controlled. Why Are Hemoglobin A1c Tests Done? When a child has diabetes, hemoglobin A1c levels are followed to see how well medicines are working. If a child with diabetes has a high hemoglobin A1c level, it may mean that medicines need to be adjusted. Sometimes a hemoglobin A1c test is done as part of a routine checkup to screen for problems. How Should We Prepare for a Hemoglobin A1c Test? Your child should be able to eat and drink normally unless also getting other tests that require fasting beforehand. Tell your doctor about any medicines your child takes because some drugs might affect the test results. Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your child, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction. How Is a Hemoglobin A1c Test Done? Most blood tests take a small amount of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will: clean the skin put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand) pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the Continue reading >>

How A1c Affects Life Insurance

How A1c Affects Life Insurance

When you’re shopping for life insurance coverage, the insurance company is going to look at dozens of different factors to determine how much they are going to charge you for coverage. One of the biggest factors is your overall health. If you have any pre-existing conditions, like diabetes, then you could encounter several problems when you’re trying to get affordable life insurance. Diabetes is a rapidly growing health issue in the United States. According to the American Diabetes Association, nearly 26 million children and adults have diabetes and 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes. This disease is characterized by the body’s inability to produce insulin or not being able to use insulin effectively. The result of having diabetes is high blood sugars, which has to be actively monitored and controlled by anyone who is a diabetic. Diabetes does affect term life insurance rates, but how much it affects your premiums depends on your level of blood sugar control. Your A1C is probably the biggest factor in the life insurance premium of a diabetic – more than whether you are type 1 diabetic or type 2, whether you use oral medication or if you are insulin-dependent, or whether you were diagnosed with diabetes as a child or at age 50. Life insurance is one of the most important investments that you’ll ever make for your loved ones. If something were to happen to you, your family could be left with a mountain of debt, which is going to make the whole situation a thousand times worse. We know that shopping for life insurance is never a fun experience, but we are here to help make it as quick and simple as possible for you. This agent is going to explore how your A1C levels will impact your life insurance rates, and we will also look at several ways that you can save Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Significance Of The A1c Test: Part 2 In A Series

Diabetes And The Significance Of The A1c Test: Part 2 In A Series

Audrey Demmitt, RN, BSN, is a nurse diabetic educator, VisionAware Peer Advisor, AFB Career Connect mentor, and author of the VisionAware multi-part blog series on diabetes and diabetes education. At age 25, Audrey was diagnosed with retinitis pigmentosa and continued to work as a nurse for 30 years with her visual impairment. She has worked as an Adjustment to Blindness Counselor and Diabetic Educator for Vision Rehabilitation Services of Georgia and as a school nurse providing in-service training for school staff and developing care plans for newly-diagnosed students and their families. In Part 1 of her series, Audrey discussed how diabetes education can help lower your blood sugars and reduce the risk of diabetic retinopathy. In this week's Part 2, Audrey emphasizes the significance of the A1c test in the effective diagnosis, treatment, and management of diabetes. As Audrey says, "By making daily efforts to stick to your treatment plan and making healthy lifestyle changes, you can achieve your A1c goal, avoid long-term complications, and live well with diabetes." How Diabetes Is Diagnosed When teaching people with diabetes, I encourage them to "know their numbers" and use them to better manage their diabetes. Let's take a look at the A1c and why it is an important number. Diabetes is a complex condition to diagnose and manage. In the early stages, there are no symptoms and in the long term, there can be devastating effects on every system in the body. Prevention, early detection, and vigilant management are key factors in reducing diabetes complications, such as blindness and blood vessel disease. The A1c blood test, also known as glycated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1c, and HbA1c, is the primary tool used to diagnose diabetes and pre-diabetes and to monitor blood glucos Continue reading >>

The Full Article Title:

The Full Article Title:

BACKGROUND Hypothyroidism causes many metabolic abnormalities as well as multiple clinical symptoms. Some studies suggest that blood sugar may be affected in hypothyroidism and levels may increase. Indeed, it has been noted that patients with diabetes who also have hypothyroidism may have higher levels of Hemoglobin A1C (HBA1C). This test is done to diagnose and monitor control of blood sugar by patients with diabetes. An elevated HBA1C usually indicates worse control of diabetes. This study was done to look at the effect of thyroid hormone treatment on HBA1c levels in patients with hypothyroidism. This study was also done to look at the effect thyroid hormone treatment has on the diagnoses of pre diabetes and the control of diabetes after treatment. Anantarapu S et al Effects of thyroid hormone replacement on glycated he n non-diabetic subjects with overt hypothyroidism. Arch Endocrinol Metab. September 25 2015 [Epub ahead of print]. This study was done at a large hospital in India. Patients who were newly diagnosed with hypothyroidism were studied. They were at least 20 years old. Blood tests were done before starting the thyroid hormone and 3 months after the tests showed normal thyroid hormone levels. An HBA1C test and an oral glucose tolerance test were done on all patients. The results showed a significant drop in the HBA1c levels for patients diagnosed as having pre diabetes (HBA1C between 5.7 to 6.5 %) and diabetes (HBA1C above 6.5%) after starting thyroid hormone therapy. There was no change in the number of patients with elevated fasting glucose levels or impaired glucose tolerance after treatment with thyroid hormone. The body weight did not change to a great extent. This study suggests that hypothyroidism may be falsely increasing the levels of the HBA1C tes Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

An A1C blood test measures average blood sugar levels over the past 2 to 3 months. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend the use of A1C tests to help diagnose cases of prediabetes, type 1, and type 2 diabetes. A1C tests are also used to monitor diabetes treatment plans. What is an A1C test? An A1C test measures how well the body is maintaining blood glucose levels. To do this, an A1C test averages the percentage of sugar-bound hemoglobin in a blood sample. When glucose enters the blood, it binds to a red blood cell protein called hemoglobin. The higher blood glucose levels are, the more hemoglobin is bound. Red blood cells live for around 4 months, so A1C results reflect long-term blood glucose levels. A1C tests are done using blood obtained by a finger prick or blood draw. Physicians will usually repeat A1C tests before diagnosing diabetes. Initial A1C tests help physicians work out an individual's baseline A1C level for later comparison. How often A1C tests are required after diagnosis varies depending on the type of diabetes and management factors. Lowering A1C levels Many studies have shown that lowering A1C levels can help reduce the risk or intensity of diabetes complications. With type 1 diabetes, more controlled blood glucose levels are associated with reduced rates of disease progression. With type 2 diabetes, more controlled A1C levels have also been shown to reduce symptoms affecting the small arteries and nerves in the body. This influences eyesight and pain while decreasing complications. Long-term studies have also shown that early and intensive blood glucose control can reduce cardiovascular complications in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Even small changes in A1C levels can have big effects. The ADA recommend that maintaining fair control Continue reading >>

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Life Extension® has an advantage in identifying modern causes of premature aging and death. That’s because we have direct access to tens of thousands of our members’ blood test results. Our review of this real-world data enables us to uncover disease risk factors that are overlooked by the mainstream media. We then alert members about simple steps they can take to mitigate these hazards. Earlier this year, we analyzed fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels in over 10,000 members. A startling 66% had higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6%,1 yet more than one in five people we tested had a reading over 6%. Gaining early access to this kind of data can spare aging humans the ravages of degenerative illness. Armed with this knowledge, Foundation members can slash their risk of cancer, vascular occlusion, and other complications before frank diabetes is diagnosed. This article will describe the dangers of elevated fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c, our recent analysis of member blood tests, and a novel way to protect against glycemic overload. What Is Insulin Supposed to Do? Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism.2 Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage.2 Insulin also facilitates the packing of glucose into fat cells as triglycerides.2 A burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion. Once glucose has been safely shuttled into energy producing cells or stored, insulin levels should drop below 5 µIU/mL.3 Only a tiny amount of residual insulin should b Continue reading >>

Serum Uric Acid Levels Were Dynamically Coupled With Hemoglobin A1c In The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes

Serum Uric Acid Levels Were Dynamically Coupled With Hemoglobin A1c In The Development Of Type 2 Diabetes

The aim of the study was to decipher the relationship between serum uric acid (SUA) and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in both type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and normal subjects. A total of 2,250 unrelated T2DM patients and 4,420 Han Chinese subjects from a physical examination population were recruited for this study. In T2DM patients SUA levels were negatively correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.109, P = 0.000) and 2 h plasma glucose levels (rs = −0.178, P = 0.000). In the physical examination population, SUA levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (rs = −0.175, P = 0.000) and FPG (rs = −0.131, P = 0.009) in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c (rs = 0.040, P = 0.012) and FPG (rs = 0.084, P = 0.000) in normal-glucose subjects. Multivariate analyses showed that HbA1c was significantly negatively associated with HUA both in T2DM patients (OR = 0.872, 95% CI: 0.790~0.963) and in the physical examination T2DM patients (OR = 0.722, 95% CI: 0.539~0.968). Genetic association studies in T2DM patients showed that alleles of two glucose-uric acid transporter genes, ABCG2 and SLC2A9 were significantly associated with SUA levels (P < 0.05). SUA level is inversely correlated with HbA1c in T2DM patients but positively correlated with HbA1c in normal-glucose subjects. The reverse transporting of uric acid and glucose in renal tubules might be accounted for these associations. Serum uric acid (SUA) is the final oxidation product of purine metabolism in circulation. Hyperuricemia (HUA), or elevated SUA levels, has been considered not only an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) but also a factor in the development of metabolic diseases1. Diseases associated with HUA in humans include hypertension, ch Continue reading >>

A1c Calculator*

A1c Calculator*

Average blood glucose and the A1C test Your A1C test result (also known as HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) can be a good general gauge of your diabetes control, because it provides an average blood glucose level over the past few months. Unlike daily blood glucose test results, which are reported as mg/dL, A1C is reported as a percentage. This can make it difficult to understand the relationship between the two. For example, if you check blood glucose 100 times in a month, and your average result is 190 mg/dL this would lead to an A1C of approximately 8.2%, which is above the target of 7% or lower recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for many adults who are not pregnant. For some people, a tighter goal of 6.5% may be appropriate, and for others, a less stringent goal such as 8% may be better.1 Talk to your doctor about the right goal for you. GET YOURS FREE The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management. See how average daily blood sugar may correlate to A1C levels.2 Enter your average blood sugar reading and click Calculate. *Please discuss this additional information with your healthcare provider to gain a better understanding of your overall diabetes management plan. The calculation should not be used to make therapy decisions or changes. What is A1C? Performed by your doctor during your regular visits, your A1C test measures your average blood sugar levels by taking a Continue reading >>

Reasons For Elevated A1c Without Diabetes

Reasons For Elevated A1c Without Diabetes

An A1c blood test, also called hemoglobin A1c, is recommended by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) for prediabetes and diabetes screening, and recommended for routine monitoring of blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. A1c is a form of hemoglobin -- a protein in red blood cells -- that has combined with a molecule of blood sugar or glucose. As a marker for how much glucose has been present in the blood over time, elevated A1c values are most commonly seen in people with prediabetes and diabetes. However, in certain medical situations, A1c may be elevated in someone who does not have these conditions. Video of the Day Blood Glucose History A1c forms naturally when glucose is present in the blood. The percentage of A1c increases in proportion to the average blood glucose level over the previous 2 to 3 months -- a reflection of the average lifespan of red blood cells. An A1c test of 5.6 percent or below is reflective of normal blood sugar levels -- or a daily average below 115. According to the 2016 ADA clinical practice recommendations, the A1c test may be used to reliably diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. According to these guidelines, an A1c of 5.7 to 6.4 percent is used to diagnosed prediabetes, and an A1c of 6.5 percent can be used to confirm the diagnosis of diabetes. An A1c value represents the percent of the total hemoglobin in the A1c form. Both an increase of A1c hemoglobin -- due to the presence of high blood sugar -- or a decrease in total hemoglobin can make the A1c percentage higher. Certain types of anemia associated with decreased hemoglobin production or longer lifespan of red blood cells can elevate the proportion of hemoglobin present in the A1c form. People with anemia due to lack of iron, folate or vitamin B12 may have an elevated A1c with Continue reading >>

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Signs, Symptoms And Diagnosis Of Diabetes

The signs and symptoms of Type 1 diabetes usually develop quickly, especially in children, over a period of weeks. In babies and young children, the first indication of Type 1 diabetes may be a yeast infection that causes a severe diaper rash that's far worse than the common red, puffy and tender skin rash. In young children and infants, lethargy, dehydration and abdominal pain also may indicate Type 1 diabetes. Once the symptoms appear, a blood test generally will reveal very high blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes can be detected easily during a routine screening exam and blood test. However, it frequently can go undiagnosed for years unless a physician draws a blood sample to check the blood glucose. In the early stages of Type 2 diabetes, you experience few to no noticeable signs of the disease. As time goes by and the untreated blood glucose continues to rise, symptoms begin. If you're over 40 or have parents or siblings with diabetes, be sure to have your blood glucose checked routinely. The most common symptoms of undiagnosed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are: Extreme thirst and a greater need to urinate: As excess glucose (sugar) builds up in the bloodstream, fluid is pulled from the tissues. The loss of fluid makes you thirsty. As a result, you may drink and urinate more than usual. Frequent hunger: Without enough insulin to move sugar into the cells (Type 1) or insulin resistance prohibiting insulin from entering the cells (Type 2), the muscles and organs are low on energy. This triggers intense hunger. Weight loss: Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, rapid weight loss sometimes occurs. Without the energy that glucose supplies, muscle tissues and fat stores simply shrink. Unexplained weight loss is often one of the first symptoms to be noticed. Blurred Continue reading >>

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