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What Is A Glucose Intolerance?

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test measures how well your body’s cells are able to absorb glucose, or sugar, after you ingest a given amount of sugar. Doctors use fasting blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1c values to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and prediabetes. A glucose tolerance test can also be used. Doctors primarily use a glucose tolerance test to diagnose gestational diabetes. Doctors often diagnose type 1 diabetes quickly because it usually develops quickly and involves high blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, often develops over years. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and it usually develops during adulthood. Gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman who doesn’t have diabetes before pregnancy has high blood sugar levels as a result of the pregnancy. The American Diabetes Association estimates that gestational diabetes occurs in 9.2 percent of pregnancies. Doctors should screen all women for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause pregnancy complications, so early detection and prompt treatment are important. If you’re pregnant, your doctor will usually recommend this test between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy. Your doctor may also recommend that you have this test earlier if you’re having the symptoms of prediabetes or diabetes. Preparing for the glucose tolerance test involves the following: Continue to eat a normal diet in the days leading up to the test. Consult with your doctor about any medications you’re currently taking. Some medications, such as corticosteroids, beta-blockers, diuretics, and antidepressants, can interfere with the results. Abstain from food for at least eight hours before the scheduled test. You may drink water, but avoid Continue reading >>

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Do I Need An Oral Glucose Tolerance Test?

Your blood sugar level can give your doctor important clues about your health, and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) shows how well your body handles sugar from foods. It can tell whether you are at risk for diabetes or if you already have it. A shorter version of an OGTT checks for diabetes during pregnancy. Normally when you eat, your blood sugar rises. Your pancreas, a long gland deep in the belly, releases a hormone called insulin. It helps move sugar from your blood into your cells for energy and storage. Then your blood sugar goes back down to normal. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body uses insulin poorly. Glucose builds up in your blood. This excess sugar can damage blood vessels around your body. Diabetes can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, eye disease, and kidney damage. You might need an oral glucose tolerance test if you: Have a close family member with diabetes Have high triglycerides (a type of fat in your blood) Have polycystic ovarian syndrome (which causes menstrual problems) Delivered a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds A shorter version of this test is done between the 24th and 28th week of pregnancy to see whether you have gestational diabetes. It's called the oral glucose challenge test. To get an accurate result on the OGTT, eat about 150 grams of carbohydrates each day for 3 days before the test. Don't eat or drink anything except water after about 10 o’clock the night before. You don't need to do any special prep before the pregnancy glucose challenge test. You can eat in the morning. Just avoid foods with a lot of sugar, such as doughnuts or orange juice. You'll get the OGTT at your doctor's office, a clinic, hospital, or lab. Here’s what happens: A nurse or doctor will take a blood sample from a vein in your arm to test your s Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

More than 3 million Canadians have diabetes, and many of them don't know they have it. Many people with type 2 diabetes develop a condition called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) before being diagnosed with diabetes. IGT is also known as prediabetes. What is impaired glucose tolerance (IGT)? IGT means that the body has become less sensitive to the effects of insulin, and has to work harder to control blood glucose levels. A person with IGT has blood sugar (glucose) levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to say they have diabetes. As in type 2 diabetes, the body produces insulin, but there may be less of it, or it may not work properly. People with IGT are not only at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, but are also 50% more likely to develop high blood pressure and high cholesterol levels factors that contribute to heart disease and stroke. A friend of mine has insulin resistance... is this the same as IGT? No, not necessarily. Insulin resistance occurs when the body stops responding as well to insulin. To compensate, the body makes more insulin. But because the body doesn't respond as well to insulin, the higher insulin levels cannot control blood glucose as effectively. As insulin resistance increases, blood sugar levels will rise and diabetes can eventually result. People that are extremely overweight or obese are at risk of developing IGT, especially those people carrying extra weight around their middle. This is because carrying extra body fat inhibits the effects of insulin. With weight loss, glucose levels will likely return to normal levels. Because there is less resistance to insulin, more glucose is transported from the blood into tissue cells. Losing weight will also help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Your risk of developing Continue reading >>

What Causes Impaired Glucose Tolerance To Deteriorate Or Normalize?

What Causes Impaired Glucose Tolerance To Deteriorate Or Normalize?

What causes impaired glucose tolerance to deteriorate or normalize? Cederholm J, et al. Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1992. Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1992 Oct;52(6):491-6. Twenty-five middle-aged subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) were analysed 5 years later, showing normal glucose tolerance in 28% and persistent glucose deterioration in 72%. Body mass index (strongly) and 2-h glucose levels were clinically useful predictors, in the newly detected IGT-subjects, of persistent glucose deterioration (IGT or NIDDM) 5 years later. The frequency of hypertension was 36% in the newly-detected IGT subjects. Five years later this frequency increased to 54% in the persistently hyperglycaemic group, and decreased to none in the normalized group. Predictors of hypertension at the follow-up were baseline blood pressure and parts of the hyperinsulinaemic syndrome, such as serum triglyceride at baseline, BMI and 2-h glucose at the follow-up. Microalbuminuria (greater than 20 mg day-1) was not found at the 5-years follow-up, either if the subjects then had NIDDM, IGT or normal glucose tolerance. ECG abnormalities (ST segment and T wave changes) were two-fold more prevalent in the group with IGT or NIDDM than in the normalized group at the follow-up. Predictors were baseline BMI and incremental BMI. In conclusion, obesity and high 2-h glucose in newly-detected IGT-subjects seemed to predict the persistence of IGT 5 years later. Hypertension, but not microalbuminuria, was frequent when glucose deterioration persisted. Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance

Glucose Intolerance

Tweet Glucose intolerance is term for metabolic conditions which result in high blood glucose levels. Pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance are all conditions which fall under the term glucose intolerant. Glucose intolerance is defined by the World Health Organisation as: A blood sugar level of 6.0 mmol/l or above whilst fasting A blood glucose level of over 7.8 mmol/l 2 hours after consuming 75g of glucose The figures above are based on the assumption that people are not taking blood glucose lowering medication. The symptoms of glucose intolerance may not be so easy to spot. The symptoms may include: Feeling thirsty Being tired or lethargic Needing to urinate more than usual Itchiness around the genitals People with impaired glucose tolerance are more likely to notice symptoms after meals. Whereas people with impaired fasting glucose will notice the symptoms through other parts of the day including during the night. Glucose intolerance will often be diagnosed by a fasting plasma glucose test or by a glucose tolerance test. A plasma glucose test is when a blood sample is taken, usually from your arm, and the blood glucose levels measured. A glucose tolerance test involves taking a set amount of glucose orally, usually 75g of glucose, and then taking your blood glucose levels over regular periods of time over the next few hours. Glucose intolerance can be treated through diet and lifestyle changes or with assistance from anti-diabetic medication, such as tablets and/or insulin. Your doctor will measure your long term blood glucose control via an HbA1c test. Your doctor may also prescribe you with blood glucose testing supplies to allow you to make diet choices and to indentify and prevent high or low blood glucose levels. Continue reading >>

Glucose Intolerance Symptoms

Glucose Intolerance Symptoms

Are you glucose intolerant? Do you have abnormal levels of insulin in your body? Here are some symptoms to help you find out. Glucose intolerance is a more common problem than most people think. Hence, it is essential to know whether you have sugar intolerance so that the problem may be diagnosed in the early stages and steps can be taken to see that it is not exacerbated. Here's an article on glucose intolerance and its symptoms. Glucose intolerance is very commonly referred to as prediabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). According to a report by World Health Organization, "IGT denotes a state of increased risk of progressing to diabetes, although it was also noted that many would revert to normal. It is a not clinical entity but rather a risk factor for future diabetes and adverse outcomes. IGT is associated with impaired insulin secretion and impaired suppression of hepatic glucose output. Studies suggest that IGT is associated with muscle insulin resistance and defective insulin secretion, resulting in less efficient disposal of the glucose load in the blood. This term was introduced to remove the stigma of diabetes from the other terms in use at the time to denote the range between 'normal' and diabetes. The increased risk of cardiovascular disease in people with IGT was also recognized." Normally when a person eats food, the glucose levels in the blood increase due to carbohydrates and sugar consumption. The pancreas produce a hormone known as 'insulin' which helps in absorbing the glucose in the blood and turn it into energy. Thus, a while after eating, your glucose levels will come down to normal. In a person who is glucose intolerant, there is a problem of either the under-production of insulin (that results in less glucose absorption by cells) or the o Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired Glucose Tolerance And Impaired Fasting Glucose

Impaired glucose tolerance and impaired fasting glucose form an intermediate stage in the natural history of diabetes mellitus. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have one of these conditions. Impaired glucose tolerance is defined as two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test, and impaired fasting glucose is defined as glucose levels of 100 to 125 mg per dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol per L) in fasting patients. These glucose levels are above normal but below the level that is diagnostic for diabetes. Patients with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose have a significant risk of developing diabetes and thus are an important target group for primary prevention. Risk factors for diabetes include family history of diabetes, body mass index greater than 25 kg per m2, sedentary lifestyle, hypertension, dyslipidemia, history of gestational diabetes or large-for-gestational-age infant, and polycystic ovary syndrome. Blacks, Latin Americans, Native Americans, and Asian-Pacific Islanders also are at increased risk for diabetes. Patients at higher risk should be screened with a fasting plasma glucose level. When the diagnosis of impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose is made, physicians should counsel patients to lose 5 to 7 percent of their body weight and engage in moderate physical activity for at least 150 minutes per week. Drug therapy with metformin or acarbose has been shown to delay or prevent the onset of diabetes. However, medications are not as effective as lifestyle changes, and it is not known if treatment with these drugs is cost effective in the management of impaired glucose tolerance. Definitions and Epidemiology An expert committee sponsored by the American Di Continue reading >>

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

9 Symptoms Of Glucose Intolerance You Should Be Aware Of

Could you be glucose intolerant? You’ll be surprised at some people who are without even realizing it. They suffer the common symptoms without ever thinking about them, believing them to be normal parts of life. It’s only when they suffer a major health problem that they realize those symptoms have never been good. You need to put your health first. It’s essential that you look out for common symptoms that indicate there is a major problem. These symptoms can be minor at first, but they will get worse over time. When it comes to glucose intolerance, you want to be aware of the following nine symptoms. Seek medical attention if you do have them. Glucose Intolerance Is Known as Prediabetes Most people right now will wonder what glucose intolerance is. Your body naturally creates this, so how could you possibly be intolerant to it? The medical term is impaired glucose intolerance (IGT) or prediabetes. It’s a term given to individuals who are at a higher than normal risk of developing diabetes at some point, especially if they continue with the current lifestyle that they have. This isn’t just about your diet, though. It could be that your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or that the normal hepatic glucose output is higher than it should be. Some doctors have linked the intolerance to the poor disposal of blood sugar from the system. Doctors wanted to remove the social stigma of having diabetes. At the same time, they needed a way to note if someone was a higher risk, as well as note those who were at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Now that you know more about what glucose intolerance is, it’s time to note the main symptoms. This will help you get an official diagnosis and help to avoid this issue turning into full-blown diabetes. Feeli Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) is a pre-diabetic state of hyperglycemia that is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology. IGT may precede type 2 diabetes mellitus by many years. IGT is also a risk factor for mortality.[1] Diagnosis[edit] According to the criteria of the World Health Organization and the American Diabetes Association, impaired glucose tolerance is defined as:[2][3][4] two-hour glucose levels of 140 to 199 mg per dL (7.8 to 11.0 mmol/l) on the 75-g oral glucose tolerance test. A patient is said to be under the condition of IGT when he/she has an intermediately raised glucose level after 2 hours, but less than the level that would qualify for type 2 diabetes mellitus. The fasting glucose may be either normal or mildly elevated. From 10 to 15 percent of adults in the United States have impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose.[5] Treatment[edit] Main article: Prevention of diabetes mellitus type 2 The risk of progression to diabetes and development of cardiovascular disease is greater than for impaired fasting glucose.[6] Although some drugs can delay the onset of diabetes, lifestyle modifications play a greater role in the prevention of diabetes.[5][7] Patients identified as having an IGT may be able to prevent diabetes through a combination of increased exercise and reduction of body weight.[5] "Drug therapy can be considered when aggressive lifestyle interventions are unsuccessful."[5] See also[edit] Glucose tolerance test Impaired fasting glucose [edit] Further reading[edit] Melanie J Davies; I Peter Gray (3 February 1996). "Impaired glucose tolerance". British Medical Journal. 312 (7026): 264–65. doi:10.1136/bmj.312.7026.264. PMC 2349870 . PMID 8611769. – Editorial review Nathan, DM; Davidson Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Pre-diabetes Impaired Glucose Tolerance

In pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range. Whilst this raised glucose level is not so high that you have diabetes, you are at increased risk of developing diabetes when you have pre-diabetes. You are also at increased risk of developing conditions such as heart disease, peripheral arterial disease and stroke (cardiovascular diseases). If pre-diabetes is treated, it can help to prevent the development of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The most effective treatment is lifestyle changes, including eating a healthy balanced diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and doing regular physical activity. What is pre-diabetes? Play VideoPlayMute0:00/0:00Loaded: 0%Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE0:00Playback Rate1xChapters Chapters Descriptions descriptions off, selected Subtitles undefined settings, opens undefined settings dialog captions and subtitles off, selected Audio TrackFullscreen This is a modal window. Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal Dialog End of dialog window. If you have pre-diabetes (impaired glucose tolerance), your blood sugar (glucose) is raised beyond the normal range but it is not so high that you have diabetes. However, if y Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test - Non-pregnant

Glucose Tolerance Test - Non-pregnant

The most common glucose tolerance test is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Before the test begins, a sample of blood will be taken. You will then be asked to drink a liquid containing a certain amount of glucose (usually 75 grams). Your blood will be taken again every 30 to 60 minutes after you drink the solution. The test may take up to 3 hours. A similar test is the intravenous (IV) glucose tolerance test (IGTT). It is rarely used, and is never used to diagnose diabetes. In one version of the IGTT, glucose is injected into your vein for 3 minutes. Blood insulin levels are measured before the injection, and again at 1 and 3 minutes after the injection. The timing may vary. This IGTT is almost always used for research purposes only. Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

Amputations. INVOKANA® may increase your risk of lower-limb amputations. Amputations mainly involve removal of the toe or part of the foot; however, amputations involving the leg, below and above the knee, have also occurred. Some people had more than one amputation, some on both sides of the body. You may be at a higher risk of lower-limb amputation if you: have a history of amputation, have heart disease or are at risk for heart disease, have had blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg), have damage to the nerves (neuropathy) in the leg, or have had diabetic foot ulcers or sores. Call your doctor right away if you have new pain or tenderness, any sores, ulcers, or infections in your leg or foot. Your doctor may decide to stop your INVOKANA®. Talk to your doctor about proper foot care Dehydration. INVOKANA® can cause some people to become dehydrated (the loss of too much body water), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure (including diuretics [water pills]), are on a low sodium (salt) diet, have kidney problems, or are 65 years of age or older Talk to your doctor about what to do if you get symptoms of a yeast infection of the vagina or penis. Before you take INVOKANA®, tell your doctor if you have a history of amputation; heart disease or are at risk for heart disease; blocked or narrowed blood vessels (usually in leg); damage to the nerves (neuropathy) of your leg; diabetic foot ulcers or sores; kidney problems; liver problems; history of urinary tract infections or problems with urination; are on a low sodium (salt) diet; are going to have surgery; are eatin Continue reading >>

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Daily Diet For Glucose Intolerance

Diabetic testing blood sugar.Photo Credit: Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images Michelle Cimino is a writer of nutrition- and food-related articles. She authors a popular food blog and holds a Master of Science in nutrition and public health from Columbia University. Glucose intolerance is a medical condition that predisposes you to developing diabetes in the future. But this does not mean that diabetes is definite. Simple dietary changes that maintain proper blood sugar control can help you avoid a lifetime of blood sugar monitoring and diabetic complications. Glucose is a simple sugar.Photo Credit: peredniankina/iStock/Getty Images Glucose is a simple sugar that acts as the primary fuel source for your body. Without glucose, your body is forced to utilize muscle and fat instead. While that may seem like an instant weight loss strategy, this alternate energy producing pathway actually results in the accumulation of acidic ketones from the breakdown of fat. When these ketones become too abundant in your blood, the body reacts by shutting down into a coma. For optimal health and proper function, your body must utilize glucose to meet its energy needs. Blood sugar reading.Photo Credit: Tolga Sipahi/iStock/Getty Images Glucose intolerance or impaired glucose tolerance is a pre-diabetic condition that makes it difficult for your body's cells to fully and efficiently utilize glucose as a fuel. This condition predisposes individuals to developing Type 2 diabetes because it results in hyperglycemia or an abnormal accumulation of glucose in the blood. Controlling your blood glucose levels by preventing high blood sugars and keeping them within the normal range can reduce your risk of developing diabetes if you have been diagnosed with glucose intolerance. Sweet potatoes.Photo Cred Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

Diagnosing Impaired Glucose Tolerance (igt)

People with IGT have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to say they have diabetes. This condition is diagnosed using the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). After a fast of 8 to12 hours, a person's blood glucose is measured before and 2 hours after drinking a glucose-containing solution. In normal glucose tolerance, blood glucose rises no higher than 140 mg/dl 2 hours after the drink. In impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), the 2-hour blood glucose is between 140 and 199 mg/dl. If the 2-hour blood glucose rises to 200 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. How does the fasting blood glucose test differ from the oral glucose tolerance test? In the fasting blood glucose test, a person's blood glucose is measured after a fast of 8 to 12 hours: A person with normal blood glucose has a blood glucose level below 100. A person with impaired fasting glucose has a blood glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dl. If the fasting blood glucose level rises to126 mg/dl or above, a person has diabetes. The OGTT includes measures of blood glucose levels after a fast and after a glucose challenge. In 1997, an American Diabetes Association (ADA) expert panel recommended that doctors use the fasting blood glucose test to screen their patients for diabetes because the test is easier and less costly than the OGTT. Though the fasting glucose test detects most diabetes cases, the OGTT is more sensitive in identifying people with blood glucose problems that may first appear only after a glucose challenge. For a person with IGT, what is the risk of developing type 2 diabetes? As few as 1 to as many as 10 of every 100 persons with IGT will develop diabetes per year. The risk of getting diabetes rises as people become more overweight and more sedentary, have a stronge Continue reading >>

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired Glucose Tolerance

Impaired glucose tolerance is defined as a 2-hour postprandial or glucose tolerance test plasma glucose level between 140 and 200 mg/dL. Harold E. Lebovitz, in Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric (Seventh Edition) , 2016 Glucose intolerance occurs in about 30% of patients with pheochromocytoma, but overt diabetes mellitus is uncommon.182 Mechanisms responsible for glucose intolerance include suppression of insulin by -adrenergic receptor stimulation of cells; an increase in insulin resistance, probably related to elevated plasma free fatty acid levels; and increased hepatic glucose output as a result of -adrenergic stimulation of hepatocytes. -Adrenergic receptor blockade improves glucose tolerance and insulin secretion.183,184 Removal of the pheochromocytoma restores glucose tolerance to normal in most cases. Treatment of glucose intolerance with antihyperglycemic agents is rarely required.182,183 Pierre Giglio, ... Ioana Dumitru, in Review of Sleep Medicine (Second Edition) , 2007 Glucose tolerance varies throughout the day. Glucose levels are higher during the evening compared with morning.51 These differences appear to be modulated by cortisol and growth hormone.52 As noted previously, these hormones are elevated during sleep, and both have anti-insulin effects. Growth hormone levels are high at onset of sleep, and cortisol rises during the second half of sleep. Insulin resistance is induced through mechanisms mediated through hormones interacting with their respective receptors at the level of the target cells. Therefore glucose tolerance has both a sleep-linked and a circadian-linked component through interactions with other hormone secretory patterns. Insulin levels follow changes in glucose and would be expected to parallel glucose levels throughout the day. NRE Continue reading >>

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