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What Is A Double Diabetic?

What Is Double Diabetes?

What Is Double Diabetes?

The term double diabetes was first used in 1991 to describe people living with type 1 diabetes who developed insulin resistance. A: The term double diabetes was first used in 1991 to describe people living with type 1 diabetes who developed insulin resistance. Due to a strong family history of type 2 diabetes, those people with type 1 who are susceptible to double diabetes are more likely to be overweight and rarely achieve their target blood glucose levels, even with higher doses of insulin. It is likely that had they not been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes they would have been diagnosed with type 2. There are currently no figures for the number of people living with double diabetes as people are classified by type 1, type 2 or gestational. However, diagnoses of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing. A: According to Diabetes NSW, Australias largest member-based charity, anyone with type 1 diabetes and a family history of type 2 diabetes, who gains excess weight and struggles to improve their blood glucose levels even when increasing their insulin doses, is at risk of double diabetes. It can be found in children and young people living with type 1 diabetes who are overweight or obese. Also, obesity and insulin resistance, while not present at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, can develop over time and make disease management more difficult. A: Metformin, a drug prescribed for the management of insulin resistance, can be used to treat people who are living with double diabetes. However, lifestyle changes are also strongly encouraged. Type 1 diabetes cannot be reversed or cured. The management of double diabetes is to reduce the type 2 diabetes symptoms of insulin resistance by adopting healthier lifestyle patterns and, importantly, reducing weight. Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes

Double Diabetes

There were no diabetes "types" when I was diagnosed in 1945. All people diagnosed with diabetes were treated with insulin taken from pigs and cows. That crude form of insulin gave me back my health. In the years 1936-1939 it was discovered that there were two types of diabetes, but it was not until 1959 that the labels Type 1 and Type 2 were attached. Oral drugs for Type 2 diabeti...cs were introduced in the years 1955-1956. Now, in current times, we are seeing more and more people with characteristics of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. These individuals have "double diabetes". This occurs when: 1. A person with type 1 diabetes becomes overweight and develops the basic feature of type 2 diabetes insulin resistance (IR). Typically, the type 1 diabetic would then use a type 2 medication to help control the IR. Insulin would still be necessary as well. 2. A person with type 2 diabetes has one of the key features of type 1 the presence of antibodies in the blood against the insulin producing beta cells of the pancreas causing a decrease in the body's ability to produce insulin. The decreased insulin production can then lead to the type 2 diabetic becoming insulin dependent. These individuals still use their type 2 medication for their IR. So double diabetics may have initially been either type 1, or type 2. Once they have become double diabetics they have IR, they are using insulin, and they are using a medicine (usually metformin) for their IR. I have several type 1 friends, and type 2 friends, who are double diabetics. Some of my type 2 friends are using a pump and a CGM. In the 1990s I stopped using animal insulins, and began using synthetic insulins. I began gaining weight, even though I was following a much healthier diet, and eating fewer carbs. The only thing that Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes Dr. Kurt's Place

Double Diabetes Dr. Kurt's Place

A few weeks back I had posted a picture of the infamous Unicorn Frappuccino . It was an image that equated the sugar load of the beveragewith eating 3 Snickers bars. I made the comment that if youre as excited about this drink, thenyou should be as excited about diabetes. What ensued was a firestorm that I could have never predicted. I was getting hammered for perpetuating the notion that sugar causes diabetes and the shaming police were flicking on sirens and showing their lights all over the place. I was being accused of perpetuation a stigma, disease shaming, and diet shaming. And it wasnt coming from anyone with type 2 diabetes but those moms and loved ones of people with type 1 diabetes. The momma bears were in full force and after I let the dust settle, I understand why. They are constantly having to explain and defend that their childs condition isnt from bad parenting nor chronic, reckless, lifestyle decisions. Raising3 boys with my wife, I know a mom will blame herself for anything that isnt favorable, even if its out of her control. But where my point was being missed was that even though something isnt your fault, its still your responsibility. And even if your child has type 1 diabetes, that child will have better outcomes by avoiding the things that contribute to type 2 diabetesspecifically a high sugar diet. Regardless of the presentationof Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, theres a common theme, the regulation and utilization of insulin . One doesnt produce insulin, the other, the cells dont listen to insulin well. In either scenario, the less need for insulin, the better the outcomes. If you consume the unicorn, regardless of endogenousinsulin production or exogenousinsulin injection, the high sugar load calls for a higher insulin need. What I want to make cle Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Cases Double In 30 Years - And The Outlook Is Bleak

Diabetes: Cases Double In 30 Years - And The Outlook Is Bleak

Diabetes: Cases double in 30 years - and the outlook is bleak Nearly one in 10 adults now has the disease, according to major study A major international study has revealed the number of adults worldwide with Type 2 diabetes has more than doubled in three decades, soaring to an estimated 347 million. The research, published yesterday in The Lancet, shows levels have risen or at best remained unchanged in every part of the world. Over the past 30 years, the proportion of men with the condition rose from 8.3 to 9.8 per cent. The proportion of women with diabetes increased from 7.5 to 9.2 per cent. Professor Majid Ezzati from Imperial College London, who led the research, says that the figures don't reflect the generations of overweight children and young adults who have yet to reach middle age. "We are not at the peak of this wave yet," he said. "And unlike high blood pressure and cholesterol, we still don't have great treatments for [Type 2] diabetes." Unlike Type 1 diabetes, which is typically diagnosed in childhood and is due to the body's inability to produce insulin, Type 2 is linked to obesity and tends to strike in middle age. Much of the increase in Type 2 diabetes can be attributed to ageing populations and by population growth, but part of it has also been fuelled by rising obesity rates. The study, the largest of its kind, was co-led by Dr Goodarz Danaei from the Harvard School of Public Health, in collaboration with the World Health Organisation and a number of other institutions. Blood sugar measurements from 2.7 million participants aged 25 or over from around the world were examined. Professor Ezzati and his colleagues also scrutinised more than 150 national health surveys and studies that tracked Type 2 diabetes in adults over 25 in 199 countries and terr Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes

Double Diabetes

Tweet Double diabetes is when someone with type 1 diabetes develops insulin resistance, the key feature of type 2 diabetes. Someone with double diabetes will always have type 1 diabetes present but the effects of insulin resistance can be reduced somewhat. The most common reason for developing insulin resistance is obesity and whilst type 1 diabetes is not itself brought on by obesity. People with type 1 diabetes are able to become obese and suffer from insulin resistance as much as anyone else. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease whereby the body’s immune system attacks and kills off its own insulin producing cells. The autoimmune effect is not prompted by being overweight. Over a period of time, the vast majority, if not all, of insulin producing cells are destroyed. Without being able to produce insulin, blood sugar levels rise and the symptoms of diabetes appear. Type 2 diabetes is closely related to obesity, 85% of cases of type 2 diabetes occur in people who are obese. Although the process is not yet fully understood, it is largely believed that obesity causes the body’s cells to become resistant to insulin. As a result, people with either type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes start to produce more insulin than those without the condition and one of the consequences of this is further weight gain which helps to reinforce the condition. Type 2 diabetes develops gradually, usually over a period of years before symptoms, such as frequent urination, become noticeable. Progression of double diabetes Similar to type 2 diabetes, double diabetes, if not treated appropriately can become more severe over time. If double diabetes is allowed to progress more insulin will need to be injected which promotes further w Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes: Is It A Myth Or Does It Exist?

Double Diabetes: Is It A Myth Or Does It Exist?

Usually, when you think of ‘double’ it sounds like a good thing. Double the fun, double the money, double the dessert, etc. However, when you hear ‘double diabetes’ this doesn’t necessarily sound like any fun at all. Most people are not aware that even such a thing exists. But double diabetes is for those special few people that have a combo of both type 1 and type 2 features. When someone who has type 1 diabetes develops insulin resistance, which you traditionally see in type 2 diabetes, this is what is known as double diabetes. It’s important to remember that double diabetes doesn’t take away the seriousness of having type 1 diabetes. In fact, they will always have type 1 diabetes. But some of the effects of having insulin resistance can be reduced with proper treatment. I suggest reading the following pieces: Why Do Type 1’s Develop Insulin Resistance? Why someone’s body responds in the wrong manner to insulin is still a bit of a mystery. Unfortunately, the majority of people believe that those with type 1 diabetes are not insulin resistant because they commonly are not overweight. This is however the furthest from the truth you can get. There are a few factors that increase your risk of developing insulin resistance, even as a type 1 diabetic. These factors include: Being over 40 years’ old Glucose intolerance history Having hypertension or cardiovascular disease Low HDL Cholesterol or High Triglycerides Having PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) Having Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease What Exactly is Double Diabetes? Double Diabetes was first discovered and introduced in 1991. During a research study for those with Type 1 diabetes and a family history of Type 2 diabetes it was shown that these individuals were more likely to become overweight an Continue reading >>

Double Down For Diabetes

Double Down For Diabetes

{{eventDetails.eventDate|date: 'MMMM d'}} • BRISTOL, WI {{eventDetails.eventDate|date: 'MMMM d'}} • BRISTOL, WI {{eventDetails.eventDate|date: 'EEEE, MMMM d, y'}} Together, we will create a world without type 1 diabetes! We are helping create a world without type 1 diabetes (T1D) for the millions of children and adults living with this disease. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that strikes children and adultsand has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. With T1D, a person's pancreas stops producing insulin a hormone essential to turning food into energy. The daily life of someone with T1D brings a multitude of challenges, including insulin injections that need to be carefully balanced with eating and activity, disruptive glucose monitoring, sleepless nightsand wishing for a tomorrow where this struggle doesn't exist. Living with T1D means there are no days off and there is no cure. But there is hope. By donating or joining today, you'll help JDRF fund life-changing breakthroughs to make living with T1D safe and healthier, until there is a cure. Together, we will create a world without type 1 diabetes! We are helping create a world without type 1 diabetes (T1D) for the millions of children and adults living with this disease. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that strikes children and adultsand has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. With T1D, a person's pancreas stops producing insulin a hormone essential to turning food into energy. The daily life of someone with T1D brings a multitude of challenges, including insulin injections that need to be carefully balanced with eating and activity, disruptive glucose monitoring, sleepless nightsand wishing for a tomorrow where this struggle doesn't exist. Living with T1D means there are no days of Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes: What Is ‘double Diabetes’ And What Are The Risks?

Insulin Resistance In Type 1 Diabetes: What Is ‘double Diabetes’ And What Are The Risks?

Go to: Double diabetes The term ‘double diabetes’ was first coined in 1991 based on the observation that patients with type 1 diabetes who had a family history of type 2 diabetes were more likely to be overweight and rarely achieved adequate glycaemic control even with higher insulin doses [1]. The more extensive, or stronger, the family history, the higher the dose the patient received. The authors suggested that this might indicate the presence of increased resistance to insulin-mediated glucose disposal in this subgroup of people with type 1 diabetes and asserted that, over a lifetime, some of these individuals would likely have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at some point, had they not first developed beta cell destruction by an independent pathological process (i.e. type 1 diabetes). At this stage, it is important to differentiate this description of double diabetes, which considers autoimmune diabetes to be an independent process from obesity and insulin resistance, from the accelerator hypothesis [2], which describes triggering of autoimmune diabetes by factors including BMI and insulin resistance. Other studies of people with type 1 diabetes and a family history of type 2 diabetes have supported the notion that this combination might promote both microvascular and macrovascular complications of type 1 diabetes. For example, in a prospective study of 3250 patients with type 1 diabetes recruited from 16 European countries (EURODIAB), it was demonstrated that women with a parental history of type 2 diabetes had a higher risk of developing albuminuria than those without a positive family history (HR 1.36, p = 0.04) [3]. Furthermore, in a cross-sectional study of 658 patients from the Pittsburgh Epidemiology of Diabetes Complications (EDC) cohort, 112 of who Continue reading >>

Living With 'double Diabetes'

Living With 'double Diabetes'

Successful type 1 diabetes treatment can yield an unwanted side effect: weight gain that puts you at risk for insulin resistance, casually referred to as "double diabetes." Here's what you need to know to protect yourself. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . As the diabetes epidemic continues to escalate, a growing number of people with type 1 diabetes are developing characteristics of type 2, the form closely linked with obesity and lifestyle habits . Though its technically not possible to be diagnosed with both types, people whose diabetes falls in this gray area face unique treatment complications. A recent study of people with type 1 diabetes found that those who gained excessive weight (often a side effect of treatment) developed the same kind of insulin resistance that is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Hearing that you have insulin resistance, or double diabetes as its sometimes called, when youre already living with type 1 diabetes can be confusing. Once people have type 1 diabetes, its not totally accurate to say that they develop type 2 diabetes on top of it since they already have diabetes, explains endocrinologist Irene Schauer, MD, PhD, an assistant professor in the department of medicines division of endocrinology, metabolism, and diabetes at the University of Colorado in Denver. What they do develop is additional insulin resistance due to weight gain and a sedentary lifestyle. To understand how the two conditions may overlap, its important to understand the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. With type 1 diabetes, the body is unable to make insulin, a hormone that allows c Continue reading >>

Payperview: Double Diabetes: A Mixture Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Youth - Karger Publishers

Payperview: Double Diabetes: A Mixture Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes In Youth - Karger Publishers

I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree. The increase in the incidence of type 1 diabetes (T1D), especially in children <5 years of age reported over the past decade can be attributed to changes in environmental factors, either quantitative or qualitative, rather than to an effect of genetic factors operating in such a short period of time. The notable increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in children and adolescents is very likely the consequence of the increase in obesity and sedentary life style occurring in developed countries. The increase in the number of children and adolescents with a mixture of the two types of diabetes has recently come to light (i.e. subjects who are obese and/or with signs of insulin resistance as well as positive for markers of autoimmunity to cells). Under the current classification, it is difficult to define the type of diabetes affecting these young subjects, being classified as T2D because they are obese and insulin resistant, but also as T1D because of the presence of auto-antibodies to cells. There is no doubt that these subjects show an overlapping diabetes phenotype typical of both T1D and T2D suggesting that the current classification of diabetes should be revised taking into account this new form of diabetes which has called double diabetes or hybrid diabetes. Continue reading >>

What Is Double Diabetes?

What Is Double Diabetes?

The term double diabetes was first used in 1991 to describe people living with type 1 diabetes who developed insulin resistance. A: The term double diabetes was first used in 1991 to describe people living with type 1 diabetes who developed insulin resistance. Due to a strong family history of type 2 diabetes, those people with type 1 who are susceptible to double diabetes are more likely to be overweight and rarely achieve their target blood glucose levels, even with higher doses of insulin. It is likely that had they not been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes they would have been diagnosed with type 2. There are currently no figures for the number of people living with double diabetes as people are classified by type 1, type 2 or gestational. However, diagnoses of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are increasing. A: According to Diabetes NSW, Australias largest member-based charity, anyone with type 1 diabetes and a family history of type 2 diabetes, who gains excess weight and struggles to improve their blood glucose levels even when increasing their insulin doses, is at risk of double diabetes. It can be found in children and young people living with type 1 diabetes who are overweight or obese. Also, obesity and insulin resistance, while not present at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, can develop over time and make disease management more difficult. A: Metformin, a drug prescribed for the management of insulin resistance, can be used to treat people who are living with double diabetes. However, lifestyle changes are also strongly encouraged. Type 1 diabetes cannot be reversed or cured. The management of double diabetes is to reduce the type 2 diabetes symptoms of insulin resistance by adopting healthier lifestyle patterns and, importantly, reducing weight. Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Double In 25 Years - Abc News

Diabetes May Double In 25 Years - Abc News

FRIDAY, Nov. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The number of people with diabetes in the United States is expected to double over the next 25 years, a new study predicts. That would bring the total by 2034 to about 44.1 million people with the disease, up from 23.7 million today. At the same time, the cost of treating people with diabetes will triple, the study also warns, rising from an estimated $113 billion in 2009 to $336 billion in 2034. One factor driving the soaring costs: the number of people living with diabetes for lengthy periods, the researchers said. Over time, the cost of caring for someone with diabetes tends to rise along with their risk for developing complications, such as end-stage renal disease, which requires dialysis. "We believe our model provides a more precise estimate of what the population size will look like and what it will cost the country and government programs like Medicare," said study author Dr. Elbert Huang, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Chicago. Prior forecasts, including the ones currently used by the federal government's budget analysts, have underestimated the burden, the researchers said. A 1991 study, for example, predicted that 11.6 million people would have diabetes in 2030. In 2009, there were already more than twice that many living with diabetes. "In a similar way, we may be underestimating what's happening, which is actually very disturbing," Huang said. Among Medicare beneficiaries, the number with diabetes is expected to rise from 8.2 million to 14.6 million in 2034, with an accompanying rise in spending from $45 billion to $171 billion. "That essentially means that in 2034, half of all direct spending on diabetes care will be coming from the Medicare population," Huang said. The study is published in the Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Double Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

There were no diabetes "types" when I was diagnosed in 1945. All people diagnosed with diabetes were treated with insulin taken from pigs and cows. That crude form of insulin gave me back my health. In the years 1936-1939 it was discovered that there were two types of diabetes, but it was not until 1959 that the labels Type 1 and Type 2 were attached. Oral drugs for Type 2 diabetics were introduced in the years 1955-1956. Now, in current times, we are seeing more and more people with characteristics of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. These individuals have "double diabetes". This occurs when: 1. A person with type 1 diabetes becomes overweight and develops the basic feature of type 2 diabetes insulin resistance (IR). Typically, the type 1 diabetic would then use a type 2 medication to help control the IR. Insulin would still be necessary as well. 2. A person with type 2 diabetes has one of the key features of type 1 the presence of antibodies in the blood against the insulin producing beta cells of the pancreas causing a decrease in the body's ability to produce insulin. The decreased insulin production can then lead to the type 2 diabetic becoming insulin dependent. These individuals still use their type 2 medication for their IR. So double diabetics may have initially been either type 1, or type 2. Once they have become double diabetics they have IR, they are using insulin, and they are using a medicine (usually metformin) for their IR. I have several type 1 friends, and type 2 friends, who are double diabetics. Some of my type 2 friends are using a pump and a CGM. In the 1990s I stopped using animal insulins, and began using synthetic insulins. I began gaining weight, even though I was following a much healthier diet, and eating fewer carbs. The only thing that had Continue reading >>

Phenomenon Of 'double Diabetes' Common Among Blacks

Phenomenon Of 'double Diabetes' Common Among Blacks

Phenomenon of 'Double Diabetes' Common Among Blacks In a cross-sectional study of adults with type 1 diabetes living in the Bronx, New York, not only were African Americans more insulin resistant than whites or Hispanics, they were also much more likely to have complications related to diabetes. The researchers used a validated measure, estimated glucose disposal rate (eGDR) which is calculated from glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), waist circumference, and the presence or absence of hypertension to estimate insulin resistance. The study, by Eric J. Epstein, MD, from the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, and colleagues, was published online April 17 in Diabetes Care. "In an urban clinic population of patients with type 1 diabetes, blacks were significantly less insulin sensitive than whites or Hispanics, and lower eGDR was associated with diabetes complications," Dr. Epstein and colleagues write. "Further study is needed to determine whether using eGDR to target interventions can improve outcomes." Dr. Epstein and colleagues explain that in populations with high rates of type 2 diabetes and obesity, individuals with type 1 diabetes may share genetic and environmental factors that lead to reduced insulin sensitivity a phenomenon sometimes referred to as "'double diabetes," although they note that this clinical phenotype has not been studied rigorously. In the Bronx, 31% of adults are obese and 12% have diagnosed type 2 diabetes among the highest rates in the US. Of the residents, 54% are Hispanic and 36% are black ethnic groups that are at high risk for type 2 diabetes. The researchers hypothesized that features of type 2 diabetes, including low eGDR, would be prevalent in the population of patients with type 1 diabetes seen in their clinic and that measured eGDR would Continue reading >>

Number Of Americans With Diabetes Projected To Double Or Triple By 2050

Number Of Americans With Diabetes Projected To Double Or Triple By 2050

This page is a historical archive and is no longer maintained. For current information, please visit Older, more diverse population and longer lifespans contribute to increase As many as 1 in 3 U.S. adults could have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue, according to a new analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One in 10 U.S. adults has diabetes now. The prevalence is expected to rise sharply over the next 40 years due to an aging population more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, increases in minority groups that are at high risk for type 2 diabetes, and people with diabetes living longer, according to CDC projections published in the journal Population Health Metrics. Because the study factored in aging, minority populations and lifespan, the projections are higher than previous estimates. The report predicts that the number of new diabetes cases each year will increase from 8 per 1,000 people in 2008, to 15 per 1,000 in 2050. The report estimates that the number of Americans with diabetes will range from 1 in 3 to 1 in 5 by 2050. That range reflects differing assumptions about how many people will develop diabetes, and how long they will live after developing the disease. "These are alarming numbers that show how critical it is to change the course of type 2 diabetes," said Ann Albright, PhD, RD, director of CDC's Division of Diabetes Translation. "Successful programs to improve lifestyle choices on healthy eating and physical activity must be made more widely available, because the stakes are too high and the personal toll too devastating to fail." Proper diet and physical activity can reduce the risk of diabetes and help to control the condition in people with diabetes. Effective prevention programs directed at groups at high risk of t Continue reading >>

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