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What Is A Diabetic Diet Called In The Hospital

Diabetes | Nyc Health + Hospitals

Diabetes | Nyc Health + Hospitals

We can help you live well with diabetes. We provide expert care and support to more than 60,000 New Yorkers with the disease. We also care for adults and children who are at risk of developing diabetes. Diabetes is a disease in which there is too much sugar in the blood. Your body uses a hormone called insulin to help control your blood sugar. People with diabetes either do not have enough insulin or cant use the insulin well. Type 1: The body does not produce enough insulin. This form of diabetes affects children and young adults. Type 2: The body produces insulin but does not use it properly to control blood sugar. Most people diagnosed with diabetes have this form of the disease. More than 700,000 New Yorkers have diabetes, and nearly a third do not know they have it. Many people with diabetes have no symptoms. For others, symptoms may develop slowly over time or are so mild, they go unnoticed. Without proper care, diabetes can cause serious health problems like heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, and amputations of the legs or feet. What can I do to reduce my risk for diabetes? Along with a family history of diabetes, being overweight and physically inactive are the biggest risk factors for developing the disease. Adopting a healthier lifestyle is one of the best things you can do to reduce your chances of developing diabetes: Eat a healthy diet and maintain a healthy weight. Aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity, such as walking, most days of the week. Get an annual check-up from your doctor. Click here to find a doctor in your neighborhood. Making healthier food choices and moving more are key to controlling your diabetes. The good news is that taking small steps to improve your health goes a long way when it comes to living well with diabetes: F Continue reading >>

The Mealtime Challenge: Nutrition And Glycemic Control In The Hospital

The Mealtime Challenge: Nutrition And Glycemic Control In The Hospital

The Mealtime Challenge: Nutrition and Glycemic Control in the Hospital Donna B. Ryan , MPH, RN, RD, CDE and Carrie S. Swift , MS, RD, BC-ADM, CDE Donna B. Ryan, MPH, RN, RD, CDE, is a certified diabetes educator and patient education manager of the diabetes education, smoking cessation, and asthma education programs at Sacred Heart Hospital in Pensacola, Fla. Carrie S. Swift, MS, RD, BC-ADM, CDE, is a certified diabetes educator and registered dietitian at the Kadlec Medical Center Diabetes Learning Center in Richland, Wash. Copyright 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Multiple staff members and departments have a responsibility for various aspects of nutrition therapy for glycemic management in the hospital setting. Implementation is initiated by physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician's assistants and planned and operationalized by registered dietitians. Meals are delivered by food service staff, and nurses monitor and integrate glycemic control components into patients' medical treatment plan. Although nutrition therapy is recognized as an important aspect of care in the hospital setting, it can also be challenging to appropriately coordinate meals with blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration. This article addresses current mealtime practices and recommendations to improve these processes in acute care. Management of diabetes and hyperglycemia has become an important quality care indicator in the hospital setting. Multiple health care organizations offer guidelines for glycemic control, including recommendations for medical nutritio Continue reading >>

What To Expect In The Hospital

What To Expect In The Hospital

“The wish for healing has ever been the half of health.” —Seneca the Younger Most people experience a stay in the hospital at least once in their lives, and for some, it is much more often than that. No matter what the reason for your admission to the hospital, it is imperative that your blood glucose levels be controlled while you are there. More and more research shows that maintaining optimal blood glucose control in the hospital improves a person’s chances of having the best possible medical outcome. However, achieving optimal control in the hospital is a challenge. Stress tends to raise blood glucose level, and in the hospital, the stresses are many: Illness itself is a physical stress, as are pain, surgery, and other medical procedures such as having blood drawn for tests. Simply being in the hospital is a physical and mental stress with all of the changes in routine. And worrying about the reason you’re in the hospital, whether your diabetes is being controlled properly, how much the hospitalization is going to cost you, how your family or job is making out without you, etc., simply adds to it. If your hospital admission is not an emergency, you and your health-care provider have more time to prepare so that some of the stress of being in the hospital can be minimized. For example, you can establish ahead of time whether your personal physician will be overseeing your care while you’re in the hospital or, if not, who will. You can also discuss how your diabetes will be controlled and whether and when to stop taking any medicines you may currently take. And you can make plans for dealing with such personal responsibilities as child care or pet care during your hospital stay. If you are admitted to the hospital through the emergency room, it is standard Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Carbohydrates And Diabetes

Foods containing carbohydrates become glucose or blood sugar when digested, and controlling blood sugar is important if you have diabetes. Healthy eating is a key strategy to blood sugar control as well as timing, type and quantity of foods eaten. Monitor your blood glucose levels and keep a written record to get a sense of how your body responds to specific foods. Below, you will find tips on managing your consumption of carbohydrates. Meals Eat three main meals each day. Time your meals based on your blood sugar, activity levels and medication. Establish an eating pattern that works for you. Do not skip meals. Try to eat a consistent amount of carbohydrates and consistent portions. Eat a variety of foods from each food group for good nutrition. Beverages High carbohydrate liquids can quickly raise blood sugar levels. Strictly limit fruit juice and regular sodas. Diet drinks and other beverages with artificial sweeteners won't raise your blood sugar levels. Fruit juice is high in natural sugars. Eight ounces of natural fruit juice, without added sugar, has the same amount of sugar as 8 ounces of regular soda, about 6 teaspoons of sugar. Eat fruit instead of drinking fruit juice. Dairy Milk and yogurt have a natural sugar called lactose. Choose the healthier nonfat or low-fat versions. Cheese has a trace of carbohydrate but is high in fat. Choose reduced fat cheese, such as 2 percent fat, low-fat or nonfat cheese. Fruit Fruit is naturally sweet so limit yourself to one serving of fruit at a time. A serving, for example, is one small apple or orange; half of a large banana; or one cup of cubed melon. Choose fresh fruit, unsweetened frozen fruit or canned fruit packed in water or its own juice. Eat fruit, rather than drinking fruit juice. Starch Eat foods made of whole gr Continue reading >>

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your Diabetes Care Team

Your health care team helps you manage your diabetes and maintain your good health. According to the American Diabetes Association, your diabetes care team should include: You: You are the most important member of your diabetes care team! Only you know how you feel. Your diabetes care team will depend on you to talk to them honestly and supply information about your body. Monitoring your blood sugar tells your doctors whether your current treatment is controlling your diabetes well. By checking your blood sugar levels, you can also prevent or reduce the episodes of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) you have. Primary doctor: Your primary care doctor is who you see for general checkups and when you get sick. This person is usually an internist or family medicine doctor who has experience treating people with diabetes, too. Because your primary care doctor is your main source of care, he or she will most likely head up your diabetes care team. Endocrinologist: An endocrinologist is a doctor who has special training and experience in treating people with diabetes. You should see yours regularly. Dietitian: A registered dietitian (RD) is trained in the field of nutrition. Food is a key part of your diabetes treatment, so yours will help you figure out your food needs based on your weight, lifestyle, medication, and other health goals (like lowering blood fat levels or blood pressure). Nurse educator: A diabetes educator or diabetes nurse practitioner is a registered nurse (RN) with special training and background in caring for and teaching people with diabetes. Nurse educators often help you with the day-to-day aspects of living with diabetes. Eye doctor: Either an ophthalmologist (a doctor who can treat eye problems both medically and surgically) or an optometrist (someone who Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Between three and eight per cent of women will get gestational diabetes between the 24th and the 28th week of pregnancy, sometimes earlier. It usually goes away after the baby is born. Women who are more likely to get gestational diabetes are: older mothers women who have a family history of type 2 diabetes women who are overweight women who are from certain ethnic backgrounds, including South Asian, Vietnamese, Chinese, Middle Eastern and Polynesian/Melanesian. Other women at risk include those who have had gestational diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, large babies or birth complications in the past What is gestational diabetes? The hormone insulin moves glucose or sugar from your blood and into your body’s cells, where it is used for energy. When you have diabetes, this process is blocked and your cells become 'insulin resistant'. This causes you to have too much glucose in your blood. In pregnancy, the hormones from the placenta, which help your baby to grow, can cause your cells to become insulin resistant. Usually in pregnancy the body produces more insulin to counter this. In some women, however, this doesn’t happen and they develop gestational diabetes. There are many health issues associated with gestational diabetes, including that both the mother and baby will have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life. During the pregnancy, gestational diabetes can lead to excessive sugars and fats crossing the placenta, which can have an effect on the baby’s growth, usually making them bigger. Giving birth to larger babies can also lead to problems with the birth. Sometimes, even though it might not seem to make sense, some babies (particularly larger babies) are born with blood sugar levels that are too low – this is called hypoglycaemia Continue reading >>

Eating Guides

Eating Guides

Purpose Good nutrition is one of the most basic and important diabetes care tools. Eating right can help control blood sugar. And good control protects your long-term health. This meal planning guide is a great way to begin making smart food choices. Whether you are following a calorie-level meal plan, counting carbohydrates, exchanges or just trying to improve the overall nutritional value of your current eating patterns, the food lists on this page will give you a solid starting point. Think of this plan as only a temporary guide. Keep in mind that every person with diabetes should have a customized meal plan that provides more freedom in terms of food choices. Just about any food, including your favorites, can be fit into your meal plan. Many effective meal plans involve tracking what you eat. Two of the most popular approaches are counting calories for regulating weight and counting carbohydrates for blood sugar control. Your diabetes healthcare professional will recommend the best approach for your needs. Goals The goals for all people with diabetes are to: Promote good blood sugar (glucose) levels Encourage consistent day-to-day food choices, including a variety of foods Maintain a healthy weight. Losing 5-10 lbs. is often the first step in controlling diabetes. Eating healthy with regular exercise are ways to lose weight. Guides Quick Guidelines Eat three meals a day and an evening snack. Do not skip meals, especially if on insulin or taking pills for diabetes. Eat the same types of foods each meal. Choose a variety from each group. Include fresh fruit, vegetables, low fat dairy products, lean meats, fish, poultry and whole grains. Limit desserts/sweets and sugars. Avoid syrup, candy, jellies, cookies, honey, and regular soda. Try the sugar free or diet types of Continue reading >>

Butler Diabetes Management | Butler Hospital

Butler Diabetes Management | Butler Hospital

The American Diabetes Association Create Your Plate is a simple and effective way to manage your blood glucose and weight. With this method, you fill your plate with more non-starchy veggies and smaller portions of starchy foods...no special tools or counting required! You can practice with this interactive tool. The healthy meal combinations are endless! Learn more about creating your plate at the American Diabetes Association website. Your BHS Diabetes Educator are great resource and can explain how eating impacts you. Together, you can identify ways to create a plan that is realistic for your situation. The main goal of your healthcare team is to keep your blood glucose levels within target ranges (before meals: 80-130 mg/dl; and 2 hours after the onset of a meal: less than 180 mg/dl). Blood glucose levels that are well controlled help you to stay as healthy as possible and to feel your best. Should your blood sugar levels run out-of-control, they can impact any and every part of your body over time. Looking at the short-term effects, high blood glucose levels can make it easier to get infections and harder to treat them. Long-term effects of chronic out-of-control blood glucose levels can include eye, nerve, kidney, heart, mouth, skin and feet complications. The chance of developing high blood pressure and elevated cholesterol are also increased in people with diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not produce insulin. The body breaks down the sugars and starches you eat into a simple sugar called glucose, which it uses for energy. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body. With the help of insulin therapy and other treatments, even young children can learn to manage their condition and live long. L Continue reading >>

How People With Diabetes Are Kept Sick In The Hospital

How People With Diabetes Are Kept Sick In The Hospital

How People With Diabetes are Kept SICK in the Hospital February 1 2016 by Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt, MD in Diabetes This is disgraceful. Its how people with type 2 diabetes are kept sick in the hospital. Heres an e-mail from Mariane: I live in Calgary, Canada and have been a member of Diet Doctor for since the beginning. I just want to show you what my recently diagnosed with diabetes father in law gets fed in the hospital. Banana, cookie, crackers, fruit cup, pudding, bread, chilli and Ensure. This was lunch. I am totally shocked! All the dietician keeps saying is watch the fat. Omg! Glucerna (diabetic Ensure) has 25g of sugar instead of 35g in the regular Ensure. They are killing us! This is why diabetes type 2 is considered to be an incurable, progressive disease. Its because the usual care makes it worse, covering the problem up as best we can with more and more drugs. Reversal of diabetes type 2 is very possible. But it requires not eating hospital food and not following insane high-carb diet advice from dieticians. Continue reading >>

Basic Meal Planning

Basic Meal Planning

Diabetes is a condition in which your body cannot properly use and store food for energy. The fuel that your body needs is called glucose, a form of sugar. Glucose comes from foods such as fruit, milk, some vegetables, starchy foods and sugar. To control your blood glucose (sugar), you will need to eat healthy foods, be active and you may need to take pills and/or insulin. In the following table, you will find some tips to help you until you see a registered dietitian. Tips for Healthy Eating, Diabetes Prevention and Management Tips Reasons Eat three meals per day at regular times and space meals no more than six hours apart. You may benefit from a healthy snack. Eating at regular times helps your body control blood glucose (sugar) levels. Limit sugars and sweets such as sugar, regular pop, desserts, candies, jam and honey. The more sugar you eat, the higher your blood glucose will be. Artificial sweeteners can be useful. Limit the amount of high-fat food you eat such as fried foods, chips and pastries. High-fat foods may cause you to gain weight. A healthy weight helps with blood glucose (sugar) control and is healthier for your heart. Eat more high-fibre foods such as whole grain breads and cereals, lentils, dried beans and peas, brown rice, vegetables and fruits. Foods high in fibre may help you feel full and may lower blood glucose (sugar) and cholesterol levels. If you are thirsty, drink water. Drinking regular pop and fruit juice will raise your blood glucose (sugar). Add physical activity to your life. Regular physical activity will improve your blood glucose (sugar) control. Plan for healthy eating Using a standard dinner plate, follow the Plate Method in the image below to control your portion sizes. Alcohol can affect blood glucose (sugar) levels and cause you Continue reading >>

The Role Of Nurses And Nutrition In Healthy Patients

The Role Of Nurses And Nutrition In Healthy Patients

The Role of Nurses and Nutrition in Healthy Patients The Role of Nurses and Nutrition in Healthy Patients Proper nutrition plays a big role in disease prevention, recovery from illness and ongoing good health. A healthy diet will help you look and feel good as well. Since nurses are the main point of contact with patients, they must understand the importance of nutrition basics and be able to explain the facts about healthy food choices to their patients. Nutrition classes provide the information necessary to sort the fact from fiction about healthy eating and pass that knowledge on to their patients. Not only must nurses be able to explain the ins and outs of a healthy diet, they must also lead by example. Healthy food choices are vital to preventing illness, particularly chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease. Nurses work in a variety of healthcare settings, not just hospitals. While nurses in hospitals may focus more on the dietary concerns of patients recovering from illnesses, community nurses focus more on prevention. Nurses who work at schools or community centers can often provide nutritional education to the public to prevent chronic conditions. One fact about healthy eating that a nurse may provide is how a high sugar diet may cause type 2 diabetes. Nutrition for diabetics is crucial. According to diabetes.org , One of the biggest risk factors for type 2 diabetes is being overweight, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Of course, eating candy is probably a quicker way to obesity (and type 2 diabetes) than whole grains or fish. It is important that nurses understand proper nutrition as it relates to recovery as well. Proper nutrition is not only important for preventing disease, it is also crucial to the recove Continue reading >>

Diabetes Defeated By Diet: How New Fresh-food Prescriptions Are Beating Pricey Drugs

Diabetes Defeated By Diet: How New Fresh-food Prescriptions Are Beating Pricey Drugs

At first glance Sami Inkinen, an elite triathlete and co-founder of the real estate company Trulia, and Rita Perkins, a grandmother of eight in central Pennsylvania, have little in common. But they do share one thing: Both have grappled with diabetes. "I thought, This is absolutely nuts," Inkinen recalled of his diagnosis with prediabetes. "It was really a personal experience and a shocking experience that a world-class triathlete can become type 2 diabetic or prediabetic." For Perkins it was less of a surprise. Diabetes ran in her family, she said, and her weight had reached 300 pounds before she lost about 100 just through increased walking. But her diet was still bad, and she struggled to control her blood sugar. Now things have turned around for both Perkins and Inkinen. And their paths were both through food. In Shamokin, Pennsylvania, about 75 miles northwest of Allentown, Geisinger Health System is trying something new for some of its diabetes patients. Instead of relying solely on drugs to manage the disease, doctors are writing prescriptions for certain patients to enter its Fresh Food Farmacy program: 15 hours of education about diabetes and healthier living, followed by 10 free nutritious meals a week for participants and their families. Dietitian Anna Ziegler selects fresh produce for a Fresh Food Farmacy patient. "In health care we spend an awful lot on drugs and devices because it's business," said Dr. Andrea Feinberg, Geisinger's medical director of health and wellness. "But we spend a very small amount on preventive medicine. It's sort of like we're upside down and backward." The program targets people with diabetes and food insecurity, those for whom it's not always clear where the next meal will come from. "We understand the relationship of food insec Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In The Hospital

Hyperglycemia In The Hospital

Hyperglycemia is the medical term for blood glucose (sugar) that is too high. High blood glucose (HBG) is a common problem for people with diabetes. Blood glucose can also rise too high for patients in the hospital, even if they do not have diabetes. This patient guide explains why some patients develop HBG when they are hospitalized and how their HBG is treated. Until about 10 years ago, doctors thought that HBG in hospital patients was not harmful as long as their blood sugar stayed at or below 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Recent research studies show that HBG above 180 increases the risk of complications in hospital patients. Keeping blood sugar below this level with insulin treatment lowers the risk for these problems. Most doctors agree that controlling blood sugar so it stays below 180 mg/dl is best for very ill patients in intensive care units ( ICU). Less clear is what the best target blood sugar should be for inpatients who are admitted for general surgery or non-critical medical conditions. In some patients, insulin treatment can cause low blood sugar, called hypoglycemia. Just like blood sugar levels that are too high, blood sugars that are too low are not safe and should be avoided. This patient guide for glucose control in the hospital is based on The Endocrine Society’s practice guideline for health care providers on preventing and treating HBG. This guide applies just to patients on a regular hospital floor, not those who are in an ICU. What causes HBG in the hospital? Many conditions can cause or worsen HBG in hospital patients. These include: Physical stress of illness, trauma, or surgery Inability to move around Steroids like prednisone and some other medicines Skipping diabetes medicines Liquid food given through a feeding tube or nutrition Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy-eating Plan

Your diabetes diet is simply a healthy-eating plan that will help you control your blood sugar. Here's help getting started, from meal planning to exchange lists and counting carbohydrates. Definition A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthiest foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. A diabetes diet is a healthy-eating plan that's naturally rich in nutrients and low in fat and calories. Key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. In fact, a diabetes diet is the best eating plan for most everyone. Purpose If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats. When you eat excess calories and fat, your body responds by creating an undesirable rise in blood glucose. If blood glucose isn't kept in check, it can lead to serious problems, such as a dangerously high blood glucose level (hyperglycemia) and long-term complications, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. You can help keep your blood glucose level in a safe range by making healthy food choices and tracking your eating habits. For most people with type 2 diabetes, weight loss also can make it easier to control blood glucose and offers a host of other health benefits. If you need to lose weight, a diabetes diet provides a well-organized, nutritious way to reach your goal safely. Diet details A diabetes diet is based on eating three meals a day at regular times. This helps your body better use the insulin it produces or gets through a medication. A registered dietitian can help you put together a diet based on your health goals, tas Continue reading >>

Barton Health | Hospital Diets

Barton Health | Hospital Diets

The Role of the Nutrition Services Department: Our Nutrition Service staff will be taking care of your nutritional needs during your time with us. When you are ill, or injured, your body needs specific nutrients and/or a combination of nutrients to help you heal. Our job, is to make sure that you are prescribed a nutritionally optimal diet to meet your specific nutrient needs for recovery. To achieve this goal, our Registered Dietitian (RD) will review your medical condition and adjust your diet, if needed, to make sure you receive proper nutrition during your stay. We understand that when you are not feeling well, it can be difficult to eat your normal diet. To help you through this period, we can provide alternate meals and nutrition supplements. If you need alternate meals or supplements, just tell our Diet Aide or your nurse. Our Diet Aide makes daily rounds to take your meal selection on a hand-held computer and will be able to cater to your food preferences. Our menus were designed by a Registered Dietitian and are nutritionally balanced. Our chefs take pride in preparing foods that are appetizing and tasty. Many of our recipes come from Gourmet and Bon Appetit magazines. Our menus are reviewed annually and menu items are adjusted, deleted, and added to, as a direct result from our patient's suggestions. So, please, when you are here, let us know your comments about the quality of our food. Three of the most common types of prescribed diets: Clear Liquid Diet- The clear liquid diet is often prescribed for a short period after surgery to give your GI tract a rest. The diet consists of clear juices, broth, popsicles, gelatin, and tea. Coffee may be allowed with your physicians approval. Full Liquid Diet- The full liquid diet is prescribed after surgery as a transit Continue reading >>

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