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What Is A Day In The Life Of A Type 2 Diabetes Really Like

What Is A Typical Day Like For Someone Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is A Typical Day Like For Someone Managing Type 2 Diabetes?

Wake up, check your blood sugar. If you don't eat right away, test your blood sugar again before eating. Have a low carb/low sugar breakfast, high in good fats and proteins, which make you feel full longer. Test blood sugar again two hours after eating. Eat a snack with no more than 15 carbs about 3 hours after breakfast. Test blood sugar before lunch. Eat - stay within about 30 carbs for meal. (Or whatever doctor recommends for you.) Test blood sugar two hours after eating. Eat a snack with no more than 15 carbs about 3 hours after lunch. Test blood sugar before dinner. Again, stay within 30 carbs for meal. (Good carbs from veggies.) Test blood sugar two hours after eating. Protein laden snack before bed if needed. No more than 15 carbs. Toss in daily exercise of at least 30 minutes, plus whatever "normal" people do: go to work, care for family, clean house, grocery shop, etc. Take meds as directed, before or after meals. Always best to take oral meds while eating or immediately after to avoid stomach upset. Continue reading >>

Stories & Experiences

Stories & Experiences

During National Diabetes Week July 12-18, we are asking people to share your stories about diabetes. You can post on our Facebook page or email [email protected] Below are a couple of stories that we have already collected: AFL player, living with type 1 diabetes Jack Fitzpatrick is living proof that you can achieve anything you want when living with diabetes. The 24-year old forward/ruckman for the Melbourne Football Club was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in June 2012, two weeks shy of his 21st birthday. The two metre tall man dubbed ‘The Fitz’ made his AFL debut in 2011. He believes that living with type 1 diabetes is an “interesting challenge” but that the right attitude and, in his case, playing footy help to lead a normal life. "It gives you something to look forward to and you don't wallow in self-pity,” says the Demons player. He checks his blood glucose levels during every game at quarter time and half time, making sure he doesn’t develop hypoglycaemia (‘hypo’, caused by low blood glucose levels). If left untreated, hypoglycaemia can lead to serious medical problems including loss of consciousness, convulsions or seizures requiring emergency treatment. He often involves his trainers in his diabetes management and jokes that they help keeping him alive. Since changing to a low carb/high fat diet and after a period of adaption, he was able to reduce his insulin intake. He now only injects long-acting insulin at night, instead of having needles at every meal. This has given him greater flexibility in his diabetes management whilst being able to train fully at high intensity, without losing strength. Jack is well aware of being a role-model for young people living with diabetes. “I really enjoy being able to tell them about my story Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life Of Someone With Diabetes

A Day In The Life Of Someone With Diabetes

A Day in the Life of Someone With Diabetes Its taken Ken 10 years to establish a regular routine for managing his diabetes. His morning starts with blood sugar testing, medication, and a healthy breakfast. Sign up for our Living with Diabetes newsletter! Thanks for signing up for our newsletter! You should see it in your inbox very soon. 1996-2018 Ziff Davis, LLC. Everyday Health is among the federally registered trademarks of Ziff Davis, LLC and may not be used by third parties without explicit permission. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here . This Site and third parties who place advertisements on this Site may collect and use information about your visits to this Site and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like to obtain more information about these advertising practices and to make choices about online behavioral advertising, please click here . Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life Of A Type-1 Diabetic

A Day In The Life Of A Type-1 Diabetic

blood glucose , blood glucose levels , blood sugar , Diabetes , Diabetes mellitus type 1 , type 1 diabetes Its already been established that Diabetes is a disease that we, who have it, cannot run away from. We have to deal with it and we have to maintain control non-stop. There is no taking a break from it. I am 24 and have been diabetic since I was 11. I have been alive with diabetes longer than without, and yet, in my head, the normal life is the one I had before. I am currently treating my diabetes with insulin pump therapy (the pump is a little machine that never leaves me it constantly injects tiny little doses, known as basal, as well as some extra insulin when needed, for meals for example, known as bolus). I use a blood glucose monitor called FreeStyle Libre, which tests my blood via a sensor on my upper arm. With this machine, I do not need to prick my fingers to draw blood (although I still often do, as the sensor readings are often less accurate than the finger-pricking ones, unfortunately), and I can check the trend of the last eight hours, which is very helpful to understand where I am going and prevent a high or a low. My diabetes and I have a love/hate relationship. I love it because it taught me how to be strong, independent and proud. But I hate it because as much as it gave me strength, it gave me weakness too. As much independence it gave, it brought me on my knees countless times, forcing me to seek support from my family. And no matter how proud I am of who I am today, it sometimes happens that I let my diabetes catch-up with me and I feel raw, deep shame. Shame for my own lack of control, or judgement, leading to a hypo or a hyper. Shame for my scars. Shame for my sensors adorning my body constantly. But despite this hate, I try to live my life wi Continue reading >>

One Day In The Life Of Type 1 Diabetes

One Day In The Life Of Type 1 Diabetes

DAY 4161 Living with Diabetes As I sit up in bed, my head spins. It’s 7 a.m. I’m shaking, sweating and scared. It’s only then I realize that I missed dinner last night. I know that my blood sugar is dangerously low. I also know that apart from my 13-year-old sister, I’m home alone. Out of the corner of my eye, I see a muesli bar sticking out of my handbag. I try to get out of bed and reach for it, in an attempt to bring my blood-sugar up. That’s the last thing I can remember. My name is Shelby. I’m your average 21-year-old, aside from the fact that I have had Type 1 diabetes since I was 9. One morning in January of 2014, my blood sugar dropped so low that I had a seizure and knocked myself unconscious after hitting the back of my head on my bed frame. It was the first time that an ambulance had ever been called for me. Apart from this instance, I have had several serious hypoglycemic episodes — I’ve had a seizure whilst on camp visiting a crocodile farm, I’ve smashed drinking glasses in my hands in an attempt to fix my blood sugar and I’ve buttered my hands whilst trying to make myself a sandwich. If you haven’t already guessed it, I’m extremely stubborn and independent. I don’t like asking for help; however, it’s because of my diabetes that I have had to learn how to ask for such. Diabetes is debilitating. Diabetes is devastating. Diabetes is draining. We’re allowed to have good days and bad days; just like everyone else. We just need to be prepared. Even on our bad days, we are still diabetics. We still have to stop and test our blood sugars and give insulin. We have highs (fun fact: we don’t understand how odd it sounds to others when we’re in public and say, “I think I’m high”) and then we also have lows (literally). Our blood Continue reading >>

Everyday Life With Diabetes

Everyday Life With Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes may change your life, but with a few simple tools, you'll learn how to easily manage your condition. Everyday life with diabetes may involve testing your blood glucose levels and monitoring the highs and lows of your diabetes, but you can do this. You can manage your diabetes. Our Daily Living Center will show you how to manage your diabetes in your everyday life, including managing diabetes when you travel, at work, at school, and on vacation, as well as the emotional sides of the condition. With diabetes, daily routines—such as working, eating, and exercising—take special preparation. Learning how to plan for these everyday tasks can help lower your blood glucose levels and drastically reduce your risk of diabetes complications. This article covers everyday life with type 1 diabetes, and everyday life with type 2 diabetes. Everyday Life with Type 1 Diabetes A day in the life of someone with type 1 diabetes involves working toward blood glucose level goals. You can do this by balancing what you eat with the amount of insulin you take. However, exercise is something you can do to boost your overall health and well-being. Check out our Exercise Center, which shows you how to get started, as well as various exercise options. To help you stay on track with your blood glucose level goals, you should work with your diabetes treatment team, which typically involves a doctor, endocrinologist, registered dietitian, and certified diabetes educator. Your treatment team can help you deal with some of the challenges you may encounter with diabetes, such as how to deal with special events and holidays, or how to manage your diabetes on vacation. Everyday Life with Type 2 Diabetes Managing everyday life with type 2 diabetes is somewhat different Continue reading >>

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life With Type 2 Diabetes

A Day In The Life With Type 2 Diabetes

My day with type 2 diabetes looks like many other people’s day, at least on the surface. Unlike someone who uses insulin, I don’t have many tasks during my day that make it obvious that I have diabetes. That left me wondering what I would write about to show the world what living with type 2 diabetes is like. This post contains a lot of my thoughts; what’s going on in my head as I make my way through my day. I hope that I’m able to show how living with type 2 diabetes is anything but easy. I wake up. This is a good thing! I swallow my thyroid pill before I even put on my slippers. Shuffle to the bathroom and wash my hands. Shuffle to my office where I check my fasting glucose. 142. Darn. Shuffle to the coffee pot for my first cup of the day. (Note: Thyroid medication is supposed to be taken on an empty stomach and you’re supposed to wait an hour before eating. I negotiated with my doctor to allow coffee first thing in the morning. My thyroid levels are fine and the world is a safer place when I’ve had my coffee. Also, less shuffling from now on.) Breakfast. “What was my fasting number again? 142. I sure wish I could figure out how to bring those morning numbers down. Now, what to eat that won’t make that number worse.” My food plan is one that contains very little processed foods, including breads. I have learned over the years that my blood glucose doesn’t stay happy if I eat bread, cereal, pasta, potatoes and most fruit. Before my diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, my breakfasts often included cereal and toast. Hash browns were a treat. I rarely eat those things now so breakfast is often eggs of some variety, and turkey sausage along with my oral medication. I also make muffins and pancakes using almond flour. This makes a very dense product but it work Continue reading >>

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

How Type 2 Diabetes Affects Life Expectancy

Type 2 diabetes typically shows up later in life, although the incidence in younger people is increasing. The disease, which is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar), or hyperglycemia, usually results from a combination of unhealthy lifestyle habits, obesity, and genes. Over time, untreated hyperglycemia can lead to serious, life-threatening complications. Type 2 diabetes also puts you at risk for certain health conditions that can reduce your life expectancy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death in the United States. However, there is no defining statistic to tell you how long you’ll live with type 2 diabetes. The better you have your diabetes under control, the lower your risk for developing associated conditions that may shorten your lifespan. The top cause of death for people with type 2 diabetes is cardiovascular disease. This is due to the fact that high blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, and also because people with type 2 diabetes often have high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and other factors that increase the risk of heart disease. When you have type 2 diabetes, there are many factors that can increase your risk of complications, and these complications can impact your life expectancy. They include: High blood sugar levels: Uncontrolled high blood sugar levels affect many organs and contribute to the development of complications. High blood pressure: According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), 71 percent of people with diabetes have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases the risk of kidney disease, stroke, cardiovascular disease, and other complications. Lipid disorders: According to the ADA, 65 percent of those with diabetes have high low- Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life Of Diabetes

A Day In The Life Of Diabetes

To shine light on the urgent issue of diabetesto celebrate the victories and remind the public of the burdens that you, our readers, know so wellthe American Diabetes Association created A Day in the Life of Diabetes. People responded by sharing images that express the ordinary and extraordinary ways that they live with diabetes. View the mosaic of images at facebook.com/americandiabetesassociation . Here, award-winning photographer Jay Dickman focuses on three stories from Denver of people coping with the disease. My 2-year-old daughter, Estrella, is getting one of many finger pricks (left) that are part of her daily life. From the moment we wake up, I check her blood glucose levels and continue to do so throughout the day. I'm a single mom, so when Estrella was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes I had to quit my job as a hairstylist and learn how to take care of her health on my own. I struggled financially, but Estrella is my top priority. I figured the only way I could take care of her and work at the same time was to be my own boss and open a salon of my own. I named it Estrella's Beauty Salon. Daily life for us means lots of carb counting and injecting insulin every two hours. Before she goes to bed, I need to make sure that her blood glucose levels are above 150 mg/dl and that she has a snack with 15 grams of carbohydrate to last her through the night. I also have to check her blood glucose in the middle of the night just to make sure it doesn't drop low. I want to stop diabetes because I don't want people living with this disease to have to depend on taking insulin just to stay alive! I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes one month before my 29th birthday. My typical day involves work, hanging out with friends and family, and working out. My life is not that differe Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life Of Type 1 Diabetes

A Day In The Life Of Type 1 Diabetes

Unless you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, it’s hard to imagine the daily vigilance that is required to manage the disease. In the first installment of a new New York Times video series, you can get a glimpse of a day with Type 1 through the experiences of teenager Dominique Corozzo. The 16-year-old has been adjusting to living with Type 1 diabetes and discusses the challenges of her diagnosis and how she copes every day with the disease. For more information about research trials involving Type 1 diabetes, go to the National Institutes of Health TrialNet website. For more information about the Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center, featured in the video, go to www.nbdiabetes.org. Continue reading >>

Pricks And Needles: What Living With Type 1 Diabetes Is Like

Pricks And Needles: What Living With Type 1 Diabetes Is Like

Type 1 diabetes, a rarer form of the chronic disease, affects three million Americans. Here's one of them. Back in early 2001, I was a happy, but slightly overweight, 13-year-old boy. Just before the summer I decided to start eating less junk food in hopes of shedding a couple of pounds from my 135-pound frame. I got results quickly -- and my weight kept dropping. Looking back, the signs that something was amiss were obvious. I couldn't make it through 50-minute class periods in middle school without having to run off and pee. It felt like my thirst could never be satiated. I was always tired. But the weight loss was the most obvious sign. Weight kept coming off. 125 pounds, 120, 115. My parents called my pediatrician, but diabetes never came up as a potential cause. An unusual teenage growth spurt prior to puberty was a possibility. An eating disorder was also suggested. By the time I arrived for my annual physical on Nov. 6, 2001, none of my clothes fit and I weighed just 98 pounds -- nearly 30 percent less than my peak weight. More phone calls and doctors' appointments revealed nothing. Back at home after the appointment, I hopped in the shower but was almost immediately interrupted by my mom. The doctor's office called with results from my blood test and I had to get to the emergency room. When I checked into the hospital, my blood sugar was 971. The normal range is 80-150. The doctors said I would have fallen into a diabetic coma within another week. Back then, diabetes seemed like a death sentence. My whole life routine would have to change. I would have to check my blood glucose at least five times a day and stick myself with needles at least four times a day. But for the past ten years, I've been living with an illness that could shorten my life expectancy by 15 Continue reading >>

A Healthy Daily Routine For Diabetes

A Healthy Daily Routine For Diabetes

Living with diabetes is a challenge that more people in the United States are facing every day. Over 8 percent of Americans now have diabetes — that’s about 26 million people in all, although about 7 million aren’t even aware that they have it. Beyond managing the condition itself, it’s crucial to get diabetes under control because of the risk for serious complications — from kidney failure and nerve damage to heart disease and stroke. On the positive side, you can manage diabetes by following just a few simple healthy-living strategies: Monitoring your blood sugar, taking any prescribed medications, eating a smart diabetes diet, and exercising regularly — every day. Monitoring Your Blood Sugar To effectively manage diabetes, it’s crucial to monitor your blood sugar. “It’s like a light in a dark tunnel: You need to see where you’re going,” says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. “If you take insulin, it’s important to check your blood sugar before each injection to be safe, or once a day if you don’t take insulin.” If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and use insulin, it’s also important to check your blood sugar before exercising or bedtime, and before driving a car to make sure you don’t have low blood sugar. If you're on medication and checking your blood sugar once a day, it might be best to vary what time you check it, sampling at different times of the day, such as before meals or two hours after meals, Dr. Hatipoglu advises. Research has shown that when you monitor your blood sugar closely, it improves your ability to manage diabetes. In a study of almost 300 people published in the journal Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, people with diabetes who regularly monitored their blood suga Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

Keeping tabs on your blood sugar If you’re not taking insulin, should you be testing your blood glucose during your day? The short answer is yes. You may not be using the results to adjust an insulin dose or the dinner menu, but it’s still important for people with Type 2 diabetes to be aware of their levels. “If there’s no testing, your sugars can be out of whack,” says Tabitha Palmer, a dietitian and certified diabetes educator working in Endocrinology Research at Capital Health in Halifax. “You can feel just fine with high blood sugar, but unfortunately they can still be causing all sorts of problems inside.” You certainly don’t need to test as often as someone with Type 1 diabetes would. But it may be a good idea to check your blood glucose level once or twice during the day. Taking medication Not everyone with Type 2 diabetes takes medication. But if you do, part of your day involves taking your pills or administering your injections. The medication may be prescribed to lower blood sugar, help your body produce insulin or provide the insulin your body can’t produce. About a quarter of people with Type 2 diabetes will eventually need to have insulin injections. “It’s not something that’s considered a failure or your fault. It’s just a natural progression of the disease,” says Palmer. These days, people are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at a much younger age, which means they could be living with the disease for decades. Watching your diet If you have Type 2 diabetes, your daily routine should always include three healthy meals. It’s important to put some planning into what goes on your plate. Because you’re at a high risk for cardiovascular problems, such as heart disease and stroke, your focus should be on low-fat foods. There Continue reading >>

How To Age Well When Living With Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

How To Age Well When Living With Type 2 Diabetes | Everyday Health

With the proper tools, you can age gracefully when managing type 2 diabetes. Aging is an inevitable part of life. Its also a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes. In fact, older adults are more likely to develop the disease than any other age group, and about 25 percent of people over age 60 have type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. ( 1 , 2 ) The good news is there are ways to effectively manage, treat, and live with type 2 diabetes as you age. Why and How the Body Ages, Regardless of Diabetes With each passing year, your body changes. Gray hair and wrinkly skin are obvious signs of aging, but many people arent aware of whats happening on the inside. Here are a few ways your body changes as you get older: Bones become smaller and less dense. This change can weaken bones and make you more likely to develop osteoporosis or a bone break. ( 3 , 4 ) Muscles lose strength and flexibility. Muscle mass and strength start to decrease around age 30. (4) You might become less coordinated or experience difficulties with balance due to muscle changes. Metabolism slows. You may find it harder to lose weight as you age due to a slower metabolism. ( 5 ) Joints lose cartilage.The cartilage that lines your joints typically thins as you get older. This can lead to problems like osteoarthritis. (3,4) Vision and hearing worsen. Changes in your eyes and ears due to aging can cause them to function less effectively. (4) Your heart changes in size and speed. As you age, your heart might get larger and your heart rate usually slows down a little. Also, your arteries and blood vessels might become stiffer, which can make it harder for your heart to pump blood. (4) Other organs dont function as well either. Older cells in your body can affect how certain organs work. Continue reading >>

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