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What Is A Class B Diabetic?

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Dr. Laura Gandrud of the McNeely Pediatric Diabetes Center on the St. Paul campus of Children's Minnesota describes the differences between types 1 and 2 diabetes.

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. katerina_98

    Class B Diabetes

    I recently read a report where a physician listed a diagnosis of Class B Diabetes? Anyone heard of this and is this even used anymore?
    Thank you,

  2. Sarah_Stevens

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabete..._and_pregnancy
    I had to look this up the other day since my doctors were doing DMA1

  3. preserene

    Classification of diabetes:
    The White classification, named after Priscilla White who pioneered research on the effect of diabetes types on perinatal outcome, is widely used to assess maternal and fetal risk. It distinguishes between gestational diabetes (type A) and diabetes that existed before pregnancy (pregestational diabetes). These two groups are further subdivided according to their associated risks and management.
    There are 2 classes of gestational diabetes (diabetes which began during pregnancy):
    Class A1: gestational diabetes; diet controlled
    Class A2: gestational diabetes; insulin controlled
    The second group of diabetes which existed before pregnancy can be split up into these classes:
    Class B: onset at age 20 or older or with duration of less than 10 years
    Class C: onset at age 10-19 or duration of 10–19 years
    Class D: onset before age 10 or duration greater than 20 years
    Class E: overt diabetes mellitus with calcified pelvic vessels
    Class F: diabetic nephropathy
    Class R: proliferative retinopathy
    Class RF: retinopathy and nephropathy
    Class H: ischemic heart disease
    Class T: prior kidney transplant
    An early age of onset or long-standing disease comes with greater risks, hence the first three subtypes

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Learn how to deal with Infant Choking & Perform Infant CPR today. Watch our video and share with your friends.

Diabetic Mother, Infant Of

What are the classifications of maternal diabetes? Why are the classifications important? What are the risks to the infant? What can be done to decrease the risk of complications to the infant? What special tests may be required for a diabetic mother during pregnancy? What special tests may be required for the infant after birth? What special treatments may be required for the infant after birth? What is the risk of the infant developing insulin-dependant diabetes? Jan E. Paisley, M.D. Fellow in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine William W. Hay, Jr., M.D. Professor of Pediatrics, Director of the Training Program in Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine Director of the Neonatal Clinical Research Center Section of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics University of Colorado School of Medicine Denver, Colorado What are the classifications of maternal diabetes? The classifications of maternal diabetes are outlined in Table 1. Table 1. Whites classification of maternal diabetes. Gestational diabetes (GD): Diabetes not known to be present before pregnancy GD diet Normal glucoses maintained by diet alone GD insulin Insulin required Class A: Glucose intolerence prior to pregnancy not requiring insulin Clas Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. katerina_98

    Class B Diabetes

    I recently read a report where a physician listed a diagnosis of Class B Diabetes? Anyone heard of this and is this even used anymore?
    Thank you,

  2. Sarah_Stevens

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabete..._and_pregnancy
    I had to look this up the other day since my doctors were doing DMA1

  3. preserene

    Classification of diabetes:
    The White classification, named after Priscilla White who pioneered research on the effect of diabetes types on perinatal outcome, is widely used to assess maternal and fetal risk. It distinguishes between gestational diabetes (type A) and diabetes that existed before pregnancy (pregestational diabetes). These two groups are further subdivided according to their associated risks and management.
    There are 2 classes of gestational diabetes (diabetes which began during pregnancy):
    Class A1: gestational diabetes; diet controlled
    Class A2: gestational diabetes; insulin controlled
    The second group of diabetes which existed before pregnancy can be split up into these classes:
    Class B: onset at age 20 or older or with duration of less than 10 years
    Class C: onset at age 10-19 or duration of 10–19 years
    Class D: onset before age 10 or duration greater than 20 years
    Class E: overt diabetes mellitus with calcified pelvic vessels
    Class F: diabetic nephropathy
    Class R: proliferative retinopathy
    Class RF: retinopathy and nephropathy
    Class H: ischemic heart disease
    Class T: prior kidney transplant
    An early age of onset or long-standing disease comes with greater risks, hence the first three subtypes

  4. -> Continue reading
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Obesity is a serious medical condition that affects about one third of the American population. Defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater, obesity is often accompanied by other serious diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnea, and abnormal blood lipids. Our team offers you high-quality weight management services in a compassionate and healing environment. We treat both the body and mind. A multidisciplinary team of physicians and surgeons are available to evaluate your specific needs and provide the most appropriate medical and/or surgical treatment options available. We offer you support from nurse practitioners, certified bariatric nurses, psychologists, registered dietitians, physical therapists, and other clinical personnel, as needed.

Utmb Neonatology Manual

The Infant of the Diabetic Mother However, the infant of the diabetic mother (IDM) is likely to manifest a variety of problems, all of which require anticipation, recognition, and appropriate therapy. Classification of Maternal Diabetes Knowledge of the mother's diabetes, prior medical and pregnancy history, and complications during this pregnancy permits anticipation of many of the problems likely to be present in the postnatal period. White's Classificaton permits assessment of severity of maternal diabetes. Classes B-H require medication. Class A: Chemical diabetes: positive glucose tolerance tests prior to or during pregnancy. Prediabetes: history of large babies more than 4 kg or unexplained stillbirths after 28 weeks. Any age of onset or duration. Class B: Onset after 20 years of age; duration less than 10 yrs. Class C: C1: Onset at 10-19 years of age. C2: Duration 10-19 years. Class D: D1: Onset before 10 years of age. D2: Duration 10 years. D3: Calcification of vessels of the leg (macrovascular disease). D4: Benign retinopathy (microvascular disease). D5: Hypertension Class E: Same as D, but with calcification of pelvic vessels. Class F: Nephropathy Class G: Many reproducti Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. katerina_98

    Class B Diabetes

    I recently read a report where a physician listed a diagnosis of Class B Diabetes? Anyone heard of this and is this even used anymore?
    Thank you,

  2. Sarah_Stevens

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diabete..._and_pregnancy
    I had to look this up the other day since my doctors were doing DMA1

  3. preserene

    Classification of diabetes:
    The White classification, named after Priscilla White who pioneered research on the effect of diabetes types on perinatal outcome, is widely used to assess maternal and fetal risk. It distinguishes between gestational diabetes (type A) and diabetes that existed before pregnancy (pregestational diabetes). These two groups are further subdivided according to their associated risks and management.
    There are 2 classes of gestational diabetes (diabetes which began during pregnancy):
    Class A1: gestational diabetes; diet controlled
    Class A2: gestational diabetes; insulin controlled
    The second group of diabetes which existed before pregnancy can be split up into these classes:
    Class B: onset at age 20 or older or with duration of less than 10 years
    Class C: onset at age 10-19 or duration of 10–19 years
    Class D: onset before age 10 or duration greater than 20 years
    Class E: overt diabetes mellitus with calcified pelvic vessels
    Class F: diabetic nephropathy
    Class R: proliferative retinopathy
    Class RF: retinopathy and nephropathy
    Class H: ischemic heart disease
    Class T: prior kidney transplant
    An early age of onset or long-standing disease comes with greater risks, hence the first three subtypes

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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