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What If I Can T Control My Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Why do I have to watch what I eat? Eating well is an important way to stay healthy for all women in pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes (GD), choosing the right food is especially important. When you eat, your digestive system breaks most of your food down into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose enters your bloodstream and then, with the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), your cells use the glucose as fuel. However, if your body doesn't produce enough insulin – or your cells have a problem responding to the insulin – too much glucose stays in your blood, instead of moving into the cells and getting converted to energy. Pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more of it. If your body can't keep up with the demands for insulin, your blood sugar levels can get too high. That's when GD happens. It's important to control it, as it can lead to problems for your baby. You may be able to control GD by changing what you eat and combining a healthy diet with regular exercise. Learn all about gestational diabetes, including risk factors, symptoms to watch out for, and how it's managed. How will I have to change my diet? If you’ve been diagnosed with GD, your doctor should refer you to a dietitian who can work out a special diet for you. Every pregnancy is different, so what works for one woman may not work for you. You’ll probably need to experiment with different foods and combinations of foods before you work out what’s best for your body. Your dietitian will be able to help you with this. Women with GD say the foods they can tolerate often change as their pregnancy progresses, which can be frustrating. Others say their Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High Blood Sugar Levels With Gestational Diabetes

High blood sugar levels are where your blood sugar levels go over YOUR test target. So that is anything 0.1mmol/l over your target e.g. if your target is 7.8mmol and you get 7.9mmol/l, this is classed as an over target reading or high blood sugar level. Bearing in mind that test targets vary all over the UK and Ireland, what is classed as a high reading for one person, maybe still within target levels for someone else. What to do if you get high blood sugar levels Re-test your blood sugar levels Re-wash your hands in JUST water and re-test your blood sugar levels. It is very easy to touch something, even your face or hair and contaminate our hands before testing. Many soaps and sanitisers can have ingredients which leave residue on the skin which can give false high readings and so it is important to wash hands in just water before re-testing. If levels are still high Record all the results so that your diabetes team can review them and what you ate so that you can review what may have caused the spike in your blood sugar levels. Drink plenty of water and walk or be as active as possible for 20 mins or longer. Drinking water helps to flush excess sugars from the body and exercise has an insulin type effect on the body. Communicate with your team Each diabetes team may give different recommendations as to when to contact them, but the general guidance given and also what we recommend is to contact your team after 3 over target readings within a week. Don't wait until your next scheduled appointment if you're getting over target readings, give your team a call to discuss it with them. Some teams will ask you to come in earlier to start medication or insulin, others may fax a prescription through to your GP surgery or Pharmacy for you to collect and start. Other teams may Continue reading >>

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

Faqs About Gestational Diabetes

This is the most comprehensive page on some of the most frequently asked questions about GD. Let us know if we missed something and we will add it in our list of questions. Note: GD means Gestational Diabetes. What is GD? What are the signs and symptoms? What kind of weight gain should I expect? Gestational vs type 2 diabetes. How does apple cider vinegar effect? What are the cut off values for GD? What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What are the screening tests available? What should the fasting blood glucose be when pregnant? What is the correlation between GD and jaundice with the newborn? What foods should I avoid? What is the correlation with gestational hypertension and GD? When do you get tested for this issue? What causes it? Who is at risk? What is the risk of getting diabetes after being diagnosed with GD? What is the risk of my child getting diabetes after I am diagnosed? What are some healthy breakfast ideas for someone with this issue? Is there a risk if taking Zantac? Does Zofran cause it? Are Zone bars okay to eat while pregnant? Is the Zone diet okay to do while pregnant? What is the prevalence of GD in New Zealand? Is yogurt okay to eat? Is it normal to have yeast infections? Is it okay to take Xylitol during pregnancy? Is it okay to have a vbac? Does vitamin D help? What are the considerations for vegetarians? What are the risks if you don’t treat? Am I at greater risk of GD since I am carrying twins? What are the risks for the baby when mom has GD? What should I do about this issue after I deliver the baby? Is there any way to prevent it? What is the pathophysiology? PCOS and GD. What is the prevalence? Does oatmeal help? When is the usual onset? Does obesity increase the chance of getting it? When do I have to take Metformin Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

The Truth About Gestational Diabetes {and Why It’s Not Your Fault!}

So you’ve had the Glucose Tolerance Test, or maybe you’ve been monitoring you’re blood sugar levels at home, and your blood sugar readings were high. You have been given a diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes. If your experience was anything like mine, an Obstetrician or midwife gave you a pamphlet on ‘Diabetes and Pregnancy’, referred you to a dietician and endocrinologist for management, and then sent on your way. And now you’re at home, and all the questions you didn’t think to ask are flooding in… What the heck is it? And what does it mean? Will my baby be alright? Do I need a caesarean? Will I need to be on insulin? What can I eat? Do I have to stop eating CHOCOLATE?!?!?! There is some debate against the use of routine testing to diagnose Gestational Diabetes, and also questioning about giving the diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes as a label on pregnant women. Dr. Sarah Buckley recommends avoiding routine testing for Gestational Diabetes for most women. Henci Goer and Dr Michael Odent are among many pregnancy and childbirth professionals who argue against diagnosing women with gestational diabetes, citing unnecessary stress and interventions as one of the risks of the Gestational Diabetes diagnosis. Nevertheless, whether you want to call it Gestational Diabetes or Pregnancy-Induced Insulin Resistance, or just high blood sugar levels in pregnancy, some women do have elevated blood sugar levels and need some extra help. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM or GD) is described as a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, and usually goes away 4-6 weeks postpartum. In a pregnant woman without Gestational Diabetes, the body works ‘as usual’. You eat, your stomach breaks down your food, you start to digest it, and the glucose from the carbohydrate Continue reading >>

High Fasting Levels

High Fasting Levels

High fasting levels are a huge problem for many ladies. Fasting blood sugar levels, levels taken first thing in the morning when you wake up, are the hardest thing to control with gestational diabetes. But why is that? When we're sleeping we are not eating and drinking and we are not active and so the body is left to it's own devices with regards to controlling blood sugar levels. Impacts on fasting blood sugar levels Many things can impact fasting levels: what you've eaten earlier in the evening when you last ate hydration levels how well you've slept the dawn phenomenon the Somogyi effect What you ate earlier in the evening Bearing in mind how much of each food group converts to glucose in the bloodstream and the time taken, your fasting levels may be impacted by this. Too much carbohydrate in your evening meal or as a snack before bed can contribute to high fasting levels, as your body can only produce or use so much insulin, so if you raise your blood sugars too high by eating too much carbohydrate, your body can spend the night battling to try to lower your blood sugar levels. A high fat meal such as takeaway food can also cause higher blood sugar levels and so eating a well paired evening meal is important. When you last ate The key to stabilising blood sugar levels is to eat small amounts, often. We obviously cannot do this throughout the night, but if you eat your evening meal early and do not eat again until breakfast the following day, it can be an extremely long time to go without eating. Likewise, if you eat a large meal just before going to bed, this too can have a detrimental effect on your fasting levels. Hydration levels Dehydration will cause higher blood sugar levels. Water helps to flush excess sugar from the body and so it is important to stay well h Continue reading >>

My Wife Won't Stick To Her Gd Diet.

My Wife Won't Stick To Her Gd Diet.

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. She was diagnosed with GD at around 25 weeks. She attended all the educational sessions to learn about the diet to follow and at first she was doing well. As time went on she gradually started pushing the limits and cheating more frequently. She is now 37 weeks pregnant and she is not sticking to the diet at all. Every day she eats several things that are supposed to be off limits, like cake, chocolate and sugar filled drinks. I've tried everything to make her stop. I'm not a good cook but I try, and what I do cook is healthy but she turns her nose up it. I went to the Dr. with her the other day and he expressed very firmly that she needs to start sticking to the diet, but it made no impact whatsoever on her. I find her irresponsible actions to be incredibility selfish, if my child is born with problems because of her I will never forgive her. This is making me extremely anxious and depressed, I've lost all respect for her and after this I have no faith in her as a mother. I don't know what to do. Sweets and other fast carbs can be very addicting at the best of times. Add to that the hormones raging through a woman's body while she is pregnant and the associated cravings and aversions and it is easy to believe that she is all but helpless to do what she needs to do. I don't know what the educational sessions told her, if it was a fairly normal one, it would be having her eating enough carbs to keep from getting free of their additive nature. One thing that you can probably do to help (if you are not already doing it) is make this both of your diets. Lead by example and keep all temptations ou Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

9 Gestational Diabetes Dos And Don’ts

1 / 10 Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy With a Gestational Diabetes Diet Pregnancy already comes with a long list of things that you should and shouldn’t do to achieve the best outcomes for you and your baby. But if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes (diabetes that develops during pregnancy), then you need to learn some more dos and don’ts to keep your blood sugar under control and make sure that diabetes doesn’t harm your pregnancy. You will need to learn about a gestational diabetes diet — foods and lifestyle habits that help stabilize your blood sugar — as well as, possibly, gestational diabetes treatment. This may include diabetes medications your doctor prescribes during pregnancy to keep your blood glucose under control. It is possible to have a healthy pregnancy with gestational diabetes, but you must take care of yourself to reduce your risk of the following: An overly large baby Cesarean delivery (C-section) Miscarriage Preeclampsia (pregnancy-related high blood pressure) Preterm delivery Stillbirth Other poor health outcomes for your baby Long-term health effects for you Controlling your blood glucose is important for everyone, young and old. But for pregnant women, good blood sugar control is important before, during, and after pregnancy to reduce the chance of diabetes complications. According to the Mayo Clinic, good blood sugar control during pregnancy can help prevent or reduce these risks: Prevent complications for the baby Prevent complications for the mother Reduce the risk of birth defects Reduce the risk of excess fetal growth Reduce the risk of miscarriage and stillbirth Reduce the risk of premature birth To keep blood glucose under control during pregnancy, it’s important to check your blood sugar level frequently. If you are Continue reading >>

I Can't Seem To Control My Gestational Diabetes.

I Can't Seem To Control My Gestational Diabetes.

Have they given you info about how and what to eat? Oh, and if you've only been doing it four days don't panic. It will take you a while to work out what affects your levels. I think it is really important for you to know about the science behind sugar and what it does to you, so you can then eat accordingly. List what else you've been eating/avoiding and I'll see if I can give you any tips. 1 hour after eating. I was given a list of 'ok' foods but not bad foods. I had an egg and wholemeal bread for lunch and hope that its ok when I test soon. Had weetabix for breakfast (was told it was fine to eat) but that seems to send my sugar levels far too high (10.1) Sweetners in my tea (couldn't do the whole no sugar thing in my tea yuck) Lunch is a sandwich or something light. Have been told that I can't have sauces anymore, which is a bugger as I love Bolnagne (sp?) and kormas. no coke, no biscuits. I have been looking at the sugar content on everything, and know I can't have chocolate (sob!! Totally agree about diet/low sugar stuff, it's a complete waste of time. I ate two smaller hot meals a day, which always consisted mostly of complex carbs (this is sugar, but is released slowly into the system) ie rice or pasta. I only had one slice of bread a day (there is sugar in bread) as the dietician said bread is often what catches people out. I stayed away from fruit juice, and only had small portions of fruit (normally with natural youghurt as a dessert). I got inventive with salad and checked out the sugar levels in the dressing. I made my own soups - and often saved my daily slice of bread to go with it!! (how sad) I am going to waste away, am only 5ft and normally weigh 7 1/2 stones. Have put on a stone so far, I can't believe I have to do basically go on a diet lol!! Friend Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Gestational Diabetes: Q And A

Q. What is gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that develops during pregnancy. It is different from having known diabetes before pregnancy and then getting pregnant. Gestational diabetes is generally diagnosed in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, and usually goes away after the baby is born. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for the mother and baby, but treatment and regular check-ups mean most women have healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. Q. Am I at risk of gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes affects between 10 and 15 per cent of pregnancies in Australia. Women of certain ethnic backgrounds — Australian Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander, Indian, Asian, Middle Eastern, African, Maori and Pacific Islander — are more at risk of developing gestational diabetes than women of Anglo-Celtic backgrounds. Other factors can also increase your risk, including: being overweight; having a family history of diabetes; having had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy; being 40 years or older; having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS); taking medicines that can affect blood sugar levels (such as corticosteroids and antipsychotic medicines); and previously having a very large baby (more than 4.5 kg). Q. How would I know if I had gestational diabetes? A. Gestational diabetes does not usually give rise to symptoms. For this reason it is important to be tested during pregnancy, usually between 24 and 28 weeks. Women with risk factors for diabetes may be offered testing earlier than this – sometimes at the first antenatal visit, which is often at around 10 weeks. Women who do develop symptoms may experience: extreme tiredness; being thirsty all the time; symptoms of recurrent infections (such as thrush); and needi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Those Who Had It - Circle Of Moms

Gestational Diabetes Those Who Had It - Circle Of Moms

All Communities > Welcome to Circle of Moms!! > gestational diabetes those who had it Sonia - posted on 09/12/2011 ( 96 moms have responded ) I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes at 26 weeks and there are times that I have some high numbers. I am concerned that I am affecting the baby as far as development. The ultrasound has said breathing is fine and baby is not to big. Those who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are your kids healthy? Did you have high numbers sometimes? This is my second pregnancy with GD. I asked the Doctor at what point does the sugars start to affect (development wise) my baby. It isn't until you are over 200 that it will start having long term effects on the baby, including running the risk of the baby having diabetes when he/she is born. Anything under 200 will not have lasting effects on the kiddo, however they do want you to try and stay under that 120, because constantly having higher numbers can effect other things like your kidneys and liver. It can also help increase the risk of your placenta deteriorating early (a risk for anyone with GD even with sugars under control) It you have an occasional high sugar 120-140, they will just have you look at what you ate, if you start having them more consistently they will want to change your medication. if you are on a pill form, toward the end of your pregnancy, you may get switched to insulin, as the bigger the placenta the more it interferes with the liver's production of insulin. weird fact: just because you have GD this preggo, does not mean you will have it next preggo. I was on Glyburide from the first trimester on both pregnancies. (They can raise your dose up to 20mg a day, if you need more you will switch to insulin) One my first pregnancy, I switched to Insulin for the last Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes sometimes develops when a woman is pregnant. It’s when the blood glucose level (blood sugar level) of the mother goes too high during pregnancy. Having an elevated blood glucose level during pregnancy can cause problems for your baby—if it’s left untreated. Fortunately, doctors are vigilant about checking for gestational diabetes so that it can be identified and effectively managed. A pro-active treatment plan helps you have a good pregnancy and protects the health of your baby. Gestational Diabetes Symptoms Gestational diabetes doesn’t often cause noticeable symptoms for the mother. Other types of diabetes (eg, type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes) do cause symptoms such as increased thirst, but that is hardly ever noticed in gestational diabetes. Because there aren’t often symptoms, it’s very important to be tested for a high blood glucose level when you’re pregnant. (Your doctor will most likely test you for gestational diabetes sometime between the 24th and 28th week. You can learn more about the diagnostic process here.) Then your doctor will know if you need to be treated for gestational diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Causes and Risk Factors Gestational diabetes develops when your body isn’t able to produce enough of the hormone insulin during pregnancy. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells. Without enough insulin, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps gestational diabetes. The elevated blood glucose level in gestational diabetes is caused by hormones released by the placenta during pregnancy. The placenta produces a hormone called the human placental lactogen (HPL), also Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Every pregnancy has its own set of ups, downs, special moments, and emotional setbacks. My pregnancy with Dessa was no exception! Thankfully, the joyful moments from my pregnancy greatly outshine the frustrating events, but there were some moments that were challenging for me to overcome, especially when it came to my health. I occasionally shared small glimpses of my experience with gestational diabetes on the blog and Instagram account, and I have recently become aware of the fact that it’s a fairly common diagnosis for many expectant mothers. And yet, somehow, it can feel incredibly alienating to be diagnosed because many women don’t realize they know other people who have gone through the same thing. It’s my hope to share a little bit about my own experience with gestational diabetes to offer a little reassurance to anyone else diagnosed with the condition that you are not alone and also let you know what other unexpected repercussions may await you down the road. I always found the shock of new information to be the biggest obstacle to overcome. Hopefully this post will soften the blow a bit and help you feel more equipped to handle what lies ahead. From the One-Hour Glucose Test … I turned 35 when I was 2 months along, which automatically qualified the pregnancy as being “high risk”. Those words sounded scary, but everything went smoothly for the first few months. My weight and blood pressure were always under control and the baby grew and developed exactly as she should. At my 28 week OB appointment, I had the infamous glucose screening. (I call it infamous because I’ve always heard other expectant mommies talk about how nasty and terrible the test was.) Turns out, the test really itself isn’t that bad. You just have to drink 10 ounces of a sweet Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes (pronounced jess-TAY-shun-ul die-uh-BEET-eez) is one of the most common health problems for pregnant women. It affects about 5 percent of all pregnancies, which means there are about 200,000 cases each year. If not treated, gestational diabetes can cause health problems for mother and fetus. The good news is that gestational diabetes can be treated, especially if it is found early in the pregnancy. There are some things that women with gestational diabetes can do to keep themselves well and their pregnancies healthy. Controlling gestational diabetes is the key to a healthy pregnancy. and can be achieved by following the Gestational Diabetes Treatment Plan. Gestational Diabetes is a kind of diabetes that only pregnant women get. In fact, the word gestational means “during pregnancy.” If a woman gets diabetes or high blood sugar when she is pregnant, it is gestational diabetes. Diabetes Diabetes means your blood sugar is too high. Diabetes is a disease of metabolism, which is the way your body uses food for energy and growth. Your stomach and intestines break down (or digest) much of the food you eat into a simple sugar called glucose (pronounced GLOO-kos). Glucose is your body’s main source of energy. After digestion, the glucose passes into your bloodstream, which is why glucose is also called blood sugar. Once in the blood, the glucose is ready for your body cells to use. However, your cells need insulin (pronounced IN-suh-lin), a hormone made by your body, to get the glucose. Insulin “opens” your cells so that glucose can get in. When your metabolism is normal, your body makes enough insulin to move all the glucose smoothly from your bloodstream into your cells. If you have diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin and your cells Continue reading >>

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I Have Gestational Diabetes And I'm Having A Problem Keeping My Glucose Down.

I had gestational diabetes with both of my pregancies. I know it isn't easy but you definetly need to watch what you eat and exercise. I was not put on insulin this last pregnancy I was put on a pill that I took in the morning before I ate and ended up having to take one at night to. The doctors main concern is when you have the baby, they could have problems with their sugar. My daughter came out and ended up her sugar dropped and she couldn't come out of the nursery until it was stable. With both of my pregnancies I wasn't able to see my baby until 24 hrs. My son ended up having fluid on his lungs, and my daughter had issues with her sugar. Try your best on watching what you eat and try and exercise. Another issue is the babies weight. My son was 10 lbs 6 oz, my daughter was only 8lbs 10oz. Not trying to worry you but big babies can happen especailly with gestational diabetes. Good Luck. I have Type 1 Diabetes, I am 23 weeks pregnant and I don't know if anyone has told you this...but the pancreas makes insulin and it is a hormone that you need to keep your blood sugar normal. When you are pregnant your body requires more insulin to preform the body functions. The amount of insulin you need changes up until you are about 36 weeks pregnant and then it just evens out again. They have no idea why but it just happens. I don't know if it is the same way for Gestational Diabetes, but i just thought you might want to know this information if it is the same. But you also should know that any white breads will raise your sugar and same with sweat things. Not to mention that salty foods can actually make you feel like you are having a high blood sugar but it is just the need to drink a ton more water. Because of the diabetes you will need like twice as much water as you would if Continue reading >>

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