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What Helps Diabetic Foot Pain?

Diabetic Foot Pain

Diabetic Foot Pain

by Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Includes photo of Dr. Kenneth B. Rehm, DPM Diabetes is one of the most common reasons people seek relief for painful feet. With diabetes, four types of foot problems may arise in the feet. Nerve Problems due to Diabetes The most common contributor to diabetic foot pain is a nerve problem called Peripheral Neuropathy. This is where the nerves are directly affected by the disease process. There are basically three types of peripheral neuropathy: sensory, motor, and autonomic neuropathy. A large percentage of pain diabetic patients complain of is due to sensory neuropathy. This can show up as "sensitive pain," where the amount of pain is not proportional to the amount of insult that is causing it. For instance, just touching the skin or putting a sheet over your feet in bed could be painful. This can be present at the same time as numbness in the feet. Sensory neuropathy symptoms can include burning, tingling or a stabbing pain. Relief is foremost on someone's mind when painful neuropathy has raised its ugly head. The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar for the past several weeks to see if there has been a trend toward high blood sugar (Editor's Note: The A1c test is traditionally employed to determine this, and should be repeated about every three months.) Persistent high blood sugar can contribute to this type of pain. Massaging your feet with a diabetic foot cream, or using a foot roller, often takes the edge off the pain. Vitamin B preparations are often recommended; and there are a variety of prescription medications that do work. Using cushioned, supportive shoes and foot support inserts is always needed to protect the feet from the pounding, rubbing and irritating pressures that contribute to neuropathic pain. Motor neuropathy can Continue reading >>

Patient Comments: Diabetic Neuropathy - Effective Treatments

Patient Comments: Diabetic Neuropathy - Effective Treatments

Please describe what treatments have been effective for your diabetic neuropathy. These comments seem to address prevention or symptomatic relief of neuropathy. For cure, by addressing the underlying neuropathy, I was advocated alpha-lipoic acid and parenteral C-peptide, amongst others. I am a late-onset (age 67) type 1 diabetes mellitus patient and I have adopted these recommendations for about 10 years now (I am 85). This seems to have halted my neuropathic deterioration and maybe effected some improvement. I feel this is a research field well worth further study. I have been dealing with diabetic neuropathy for more than four years. I have been a diabetic since 1996 and I suffer also with gastroparesis, and also chronic intestinal pseudo obstruction. However, I take Lyrica 300 mg twice daily for the neuropathy. I have had an increase in weight of almost 25 pounds within 6 to 8 months. But the Lyrica seems to be the only thing that has helped. I also have a feeding tube for which I have had so many replacements, which my doctor says is due to the gastroparesis. I have had idiopathic neuropathy for 18 months. It is triggered by certain foods and drinks, and exacerbated by stress. Daily use of Forskolin, ALA (alpha lipoic acid), ALCAR (acetyl L-carnitine), evening primrose oil, and fish oil have gotten it under control. A lot of money and time spend researching and experimenting because neurologists and their drugs have been worthless. I've had periodic neuropathy nerve pain in my hands and feet for 9 months now. I control the pain by decreasing my sugar intake and using oregano oil with P 73 at bedtime and it works well. Wipe down hand and feet with rubbing alcohol and apply the oregano oil. The best and just about only effective treatment for my diabetic neuropathy ha Continue reading >>

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

Home Remedies For Diabetic Foot Pain

My husband's feet are getting painful, swollen, and numb due to his diabetes. Even if he gets medicine for diabetes this pain never stops. Please tell me if someone knows of or has experience with some home remedies for this pain and numbness. Your suggestions would be highly appreciated. By smile Answers No please, stop! Do not use ice on diabetic numb or swollen feet! If his blood sugars are uncontrolled and running too high, that in itself can cause severe neurological pain & numbness in the extremities! There's no home remedy for that EXCEPT tight blood sugar control! 1) Get him to the doc! Have his Ha1C checked! Have swelling & pain & numbness thoroughly evaluated! Don't treat this lightly, this could be life threatening! Does he have hardening of the arteries? CHF? Any other heart conditions? Kidney disease? Has he had his brachial BP checked in his ankles lately? There could be many reasons for the swollen feet too! Edema can be due to many causes. I have been Type 1 diabetic for 30 years, and used to get neuropathy pains in both feet and legs, hands & arms too. I was put on prescription Neurontin (generic version tho, Gabapentin) for about 10 years & increased up to 300mg twice a day. That worked great, but since I have cut out all white carbs, eat lots of fatfree salads, fresh veggies & fruits (at least 5 servings a day), lean meats--follow the American Heart Association diet basically - extra light olive oil, all antioxidant & anti-inflammatory foods, no junk foods, no fast foods, no sat fats or trans fats, no processed foods, no nitrates. For over 2 years now, I have stopped the Neurontin altogether within the past year, and lowered my HA1C to 7, but being on an insulin pump, I want to get it lower, 6.5%. I feel the best now than I have in 30 yrs! The neuropa Continue reading >>

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

7 Natural Diabetic Neuropathy Treatments That Work

Diabetes itself is extremely common, affecting about one in every three adults in the U.S., and diabetic neuropathy is one of the most likely complications to develop as a side effect because high blood sugar levels affect nerve fibers throughout the body. Neuropathy is a pathological condition that encompasses more than 100 different forms and manifestations of nerve damage, both in people with diabetes and those without. (1) Diabetic neuropathy (also sometimes called peripheral neuropathy) is the term for nerve damage caused by diabetes, a chronic condition that occurs when the body doesn’t use the hormone insulin properly. Neuropathy can form anywhere but is most likely to affect nerves running through the limbs, hands and feet. Not every person with diabetes symptoms develops complications such as neuropathy, but many do. In fact, up to 60 percent to 70 percent of all diabetics experience some form of neuropathy. For some people, only mild symptoms develop from nerve damage, such as tingling or numbness in the limbs. But for others, neuropathy causes a good amount of pain, digestive issues, problems with the heart and blood vessels, the inability to go about life normally, and even death if major organs are affected badly enough. Diabetic neuropathy can trigger a cascade of events that lead to even more serious complications. Just like with diabetes itself, there is no known “cure” for peripheral neuropathy, only ways to manage it and stop progression, similarly to the natural treatments for diabetes. It’s a dangerous problem to have, but fortunately most people are able to keep it under control by regulating their blood sugar levels, changing their diets and adopting healthier lifestyles overall, all of which help control their diabetes. 7 Natural Remedies Continue reading >>

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications To Treat Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Medications are used to control the pain associated with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Unfortunately, at this time, there aren’t any medications to treat and prevent diabetic nerve pain (another name for diabetic neuropathy); the only way to do that is through careful control of blood glucose levels. There are many medication options to relieve pain associated with peripheral nerve damage. You should work carefully with your doctor to figure out what medications are best for you. If you’d like to learn more about treatments for the other types of diabetic neuropathy, this section of the article reviews treatment options for autonomic, proximal, and focal neuropathy. Medication Warning Because of the possible interactions and side effects, always discuss medications with your doctor—even if they’re “just” over-the-counter. This is particularly important when you have diabetes because these over-the-counter medications may have interactions with other medications you’re using. Over-the-counter Medications for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy For people in the early stages of diabetic neuropathy—when the pain isn’t severe—over-the-counter medications may be enough to relieve the pain. However, people with more advanced nerve damage may not find over-the-counter medications helpful. For diabetic neuropathy, you may want to try: Acetaminophen: This is a painkiller, also known as an analgesic. Tylenol is an example of acetaminophen, and it works by blocking pain messages to the brain. In essence, acetaminophen makes it harder for the “pain” signal to travel through the nerves and to the brain, and therefore, the brain doesn’t know that it should be feeling pain. Possible side effects include liver damage, but that’s after taking large quantities fo Continue reading >>

Sensitive Feet And Diabetes: Why My Feet Hurt?

Sensitive Feet And Diabetes: Why My Feet Hurt?

What is nerve damage from diabetes? Diabetic neuropathies are nerve damage caused by diabetes. Neuropathy is one of the most common long term complications of diabetes. It can occur anywhere in the body, and in any organ. Symptoms such as numbness, tingling, and loss of protective sensation can be found in the hands, arms, fingers, feet, legs, toes, and lips. You may also have symptoms of nerve damage in the digestive system (gastroparesis), in the heart, or in sexual organs (erectile dysfunction, or vaginal dryness). In this article, we will be mainly looking at peripheral neuropathy in the feet, also commonly known as sensitive feet. What are sensitive feet? Patients complain about numbness and tingling in their feet and toes, or elsewhere, with a frequency that is more often than in similar reports of other diabetes complications they experience. It’s no wonder these patients with diabetes have complaints of neuropathy symptoms. Other than the tingling sensation or the numbness usually associated with neuropathy, those who have it complain about how much it hurts to put their socks and shoes on. The skin is sensitive to touch, to a point where one can’t even brush up against anything. It is likened to an over-sensitivity and mild pain that is uncomfortable. If it goes on day in and day out, it can be frustrating. Sometimes, a person with diabetes may also get other related foot problems, such as plantar fasciitis. This condition affects the heel of the foot, and can be extremely painful. You will find it too sore to walk with plantar fasciitis. Even without heel problems, the generalized foot pain and soreness can become severe. It has been found that as many as 60 to 70% of people with diabetes have neuropathy somewhere in their body. The longer you have diabete Continue reading >>

10 Ways To Reduce And Relieve Diabetic Neuropathy Pain | Footfiles

10 Ways To Reduce And Relieve Diabetic Neuropathy Pain | Footfiles

Moisturizing TricksThat Keeps Diabetic Skin Soft Soaking in a warm bath or indulging in a foot soak is relaxing for your entire body, and it has the added benefit of improving circulation, which can instantly relieve pain associated with peripheral neuropathy. But because diabetes can cause loss of sensation, including the ability to feel hot and cold, you should use a thermometer or the help of a friend or loved one to check the water temperature before diving in. Research has shown that vitamin D, which your skin naturally produces in response to sunlight, may help relieve symptoms ofneuropathy and diabetic foot pain. Its difficult to get enough of the essential nutrient from sun exposure and diet, however, so doctors recommend taking a daily dose of a vitamin D supplement (600 to 800 IU), which studies have shown can significantly reduce peripheral neuropathy symptoms in as little as two months. Incorporate A B Vitamin Complex Into Your Daily Routine In addition to inspecting your feet on a daily basis, you may want to try adding a B vitamin complex into your routine. A lack of B12 has been linked to nerve damage, and B6 assists the brain in its production of chemicals that send information through our bodies. It might sound counterintuitive to work out the limbs that are causing you pain, but exercise actually has several pain-relieving benefits for those suffering from diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Exercise helps control blood sugar levels, which slows nerve damage and therefore helps decrease nerve pain. Physical activity increases circulation, which reduces nerve pain. Exercise boosts your mood and is a natural stress reliever, which helps relieve some of the discomfort. If activities such as jogging and traditional sports are too painful, try activities with Continue reading >>

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

What Can I Do For Numb, Painful Feet And Legs?

My husband was diagnosed with diabetes almost a year ago. At first he was experiencing numbness in his feet. Over the past few months, he began having pain as well, sometimes as far up his leg as his calf. What can we do to help these symptoms? I have read that vitamin E and even flaxseed oil are good for the circulation. Would those be helpful? Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes And Foot Problems Treatment And Complications

Diabetes and foot problems facts Two main conditions, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and peripheral neuropathy, are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Symptoms and signs of diabetic foot problems arise due to the decreased sensation from nerve damage as well as the lack of oxygen delivery to the feet caused by vascular disease. Diabetic foot problems also include bunions, corns, calluses, hammertoes, fungal infections, dryness of the skin, and ingrown toenails. These problems are not specific to diabetes, but may occur more commonly due to the nerve and vascular damage caused by diabetes. Treatment depends on the exact type of foot problem. Surgery or even amputation may be required for some cases. Gangrene (dry gangrene) is tissue death due to absence of blood circulation. It can be life threatening if bacterial infection develops (wet gangrene). Many diabetes-related foot problems can be prevented by good control of blood sugar levels combined with appropriate care of the feet. How can diabetes cause foot problems? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause damage to blood vessels and peripheral nerves that can result in problems in the legs and feet. Two main conditions, 1) peripheral artery disease (PAD), and 2) peripheral neuropathy are responsible for the increased risk of foot problems in people with diabetes. Peripheral artery disease (PAD), sometimes referred to as peripheral vascular disease (PVD), means that there is narrowing or occlusion by atherosclerotic plaques of arteries outside of the heart and brain. This is sometimes referred to as "hardening" of the arteries. Diabetes is a known risk factor for developing peripheral artery disease. In addition to pain in the calves during exercise (medically known as intermitte Continue reading >>

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Print Diabetic neuropathy is usually diagnosed based on your symptoms, your medical history and a physical exam. During the exam, your doctor is likely to check your muscle strength and tone, tendon reflexes, and sensitivity to touch, temperature and vibration. Your doctor may also conduct tests that include: Filament test. Sensitivity to touch may be tested using a soft nylon fiber called a monofilament. Nerve conduction studies. This test measures how quickly the nerves in your arms and legs conduct electrical signals. It's often used to diagnose carpal tunnel syndrome. Electromyography (EMG). Often performed along with nerve conduction studies, electromyography measures the electrical discharges produced in your muscles. Quantitative sensory testing. This noninvasive test is used to assess how your nerves respond to vibration and changes in temperature. Autonomic testing. If you have symptoms of autonomic neuropathy, your doctor may request special tests to look at your blood pressure in different positions and assess your ability to sweat. The American Diabetes Association recommends that all people with diabetes have a comprehensive foot exam — either by a doctor or by a foot specialist (podiatrist) — at least once a year. In addition, your feet should be checked for sores, cracked skin, calluses, blisters, and bone and joint abnormalities at every office visit. Treatment Diabetic neuropathy has no known cure. Treatment for diabetic neuropathy focuses on: Slowing progression of the disease Relieving pain Managing complications and restoring function Slowing progression of the disease Consistently keeping blood sugar within a target range can help prevent or delay the progression of diabetic neuropathy and may even improve some of the symptoms you already have. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic Neuropathydiabetic Neuropathy Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Diabetic neuropathy definition and facts Diabetes is thought to damage nerves as a result of prolonged elevated levels of blood glucose. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly causes: Autonomic neuropathy causes symptoms related to dysfunction of an organ system, such as: Diagnosis of diabetic neuropathy is usually done by a clinical exam. There is no cure for diabetic neuropathy, but treatments are available to manage the symptoms. Diabetic nerve pain may be controlled by medications such as tricyclic antidepressants, duloxetine (Cymbalta), or certain antiseizure medications. Keeping tight control of blood sugar levels is the best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy and other complications of diabetes. Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Improve Diabetes Nerve Pain What are the symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy? The symptoms and signs of diabetic neuropathy depend upon the type of neuropathy that is present. Signs and symptoms can also vary in severity among affected people. Signs and symptoms of diabetic peripheral neuropathy include: Numbness or tingling of the feet and lower legs Pain or burning sensations Loss of sensation in the feet or lower legs Sometimes, but less commonly, these symptoms can occur in the hands or arms Signs and symptoms of diabetic proximal neuropathy include: Pain, usually on one side, in the hips, buttocks, or thighs Signs and symptoms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy depend upon the organ system that is involved and can include: Feeling full after eating a small amount Inability to empty the bladder completely Decrease in vaginal lubrication in women Rapid resting heartbeat Signs and symptoms of diabetic focal neuropathy also depend upon the location of the affected nerve. The symptoms can appear suddenly. It usually does not cause a long t Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

What Is Diabetic Nerve Pain?

If you have diabetes and shooting, burning, pins and needles pain in your feet or hands, you could have painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy—also known as diabetic nerve pain. It is a common complication of diabetes. The most common cause is poorly controlled blood sugar over time. Diabetic nerve pain can take years to develop. In the early stages, you may have no signs at all, and then only start to feel a tingling or numbness in your feet. As it progresses, you may also feel the pain in your hands and it is often worse at night. This means that your nerves may be damaged for a long time before you experience painful symptoms. Nerve damage can’t be reversed, but controlling your blood sugar can help prevent further damage. Talk to your doctor if you experience any symptoms of diabetic nerve pain. Symptoms of diabetic nerve pain These are some of the most common symptoms of diabetic nerve pain: Shooting Burning Pins and needles Numbness Electric shock-like Throbbing Tingling Stinging Stabbing Radiating Sensitivity to touch How is diabetic nerve pain different from other pain? There are two types of pain—muscle pain or nerve pain. Both types of pain are your body’s way of telling you that something is wrong but each has its own cause, symptoms, and management. Muscle pain is a "protective" form of pain. It is caused by something specific like an injury or inflammation. The nerves in the injured muscle or joint send electric signals to the brain as a warning that damage has occurred and the activity you’re doing is causing harm. If you limit or stop the harmful activity, muscle pain can get better over time. Nerve pain is a "non-protective" form of pain. It occurs when your nerves are damaged by an injury or disease, such as diabetes. Your nerves send extra el Continue reading >>

Ten Ways To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy At Home

Ten Ways To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy At Home

TEN WAYS TO TREAT DIABETIC NEUROPATHY AT HOME Millions of people suffer with diabetic neuropathy. Millions of people suffer with diabetic neuropathy. Medicines treating this condition can only decrease the nerve pain to about 50 percent. Because of this and the fact that many people do not like the side effects of the drugs, people are finding alternative methods for treating neuropathy. Experts say the trend toward self-care is a good thing and there are many things that you can do at home to help yourself decrease nerve pain. Diabetic neuropathy is the result of nerve damage caused by the toxic effects of high blood sugars and poor circulation. As the condition progresses, numbness occurs in the feet, hands, and legs. Damage to the nerves can also cause them to misfire, causing extreme pain during simple touch responses or for no reason at all. People describe the pain as burning, electrical shocks or pins and needles. About 25 percent of diabetics report pain ranging from annoying to debilitating. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a complication of diabetes and the people dealing with the pain from this condition need to try other remedies than just medicines to help them manage the pain. Here are the top ten strategies for managing diabetic neuropathy at home. Some you may have heard about, some are new surprises. When it comes managing the pain of diabetic neuropathy, nothing beats controlling the blood sugar. Doctors would agree that this is the No. 1 strategy and is probably the whole top ten. After all, it is the toxic effects of high blood sugar that brings on the pain associated with neuropathy. Studies have shown that diabetic patients who religiously control their blood sugar levels stop the nerve damage and improve the pain from neuropathy. In fact, some d Continue reading >>

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Tips For Treating Diabetic Nerve Pain

Diabetes can cause long-term problems throughout your body, especially if you don’t control your blood sugar effectively, and sugar levels remain high for many years. High blood sugar can cause diabetic neuropathy, which damages the nerves that send signals from your hands and feet. Diabetic neuropathy can cause numbness or tingling in your fingers, toes, hands, and feet. Another symptom is a burning, sharp, or aching pain (diabetic nerve pain). The pain may be mild at first, but it can get worse over time and spread up your legs or arms. Walking can be painful, and even the softest touch can feel unbearable. Up to 50 percent of people with diabetes may experience nerve pain. Nerve damage can affect your ability to sleep, decrease your quality of life, and can also cause depression. Damaged nerves can’t be replaced. However, there are ways that you can prevent further damage and relieve your pain. First, control your blood sugar so the damage doesn’t progress. Talk to your doctor about setting your blood sugar goal, and learn to monitor it. You may be asked to lower your blood sugar before meals to 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) and your blood sugar after meals to less than 180 mg/dL. Use diets, exercise, and medications to decrease your blood sugar to a healthier range. Monitor other health risks that can worsen your diabetes, such as your weight and smoking. Ask your doctor about effective ways to lose weight or quit smoking, if necessary. Your doctor might suggest trying an over-the-counter pain reliever, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol), aspirin (Bufferin), or ibuprofen (Motrin IB, Advil), which are available without a prescription but can cause side effects. Use a low dose for a short time to control your symptoms. Other options exist for stronger Continue reading >>

24 Natural Home Remedies For Neuropathy Pain In Feet And Hands

24 Natural Home Remedies For Neuropathy Pain In Feet And Hands

Peripheral neuropathy is a condition which describes damage to the peripheral nervous system, which transmits information from the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. This can result in pain, loss of feeling, and inability to control muscles. As with any other condition, there is no “one size fits all” remedy for those suffering from this malady and treatment may vary depending on the cause and severity. However, many individuals find relief using natural remedies. Here are the top 24 Natural Home Remedies For Neuropathy Pain In Feet And Hands I. Overview Of Neuropathy – Symptoms And Causes: Peripheral neuropathy usually leads to anesthesia and pain in the feet and hands. People often describe the peripheral neuropathy pain like burning or tingling, while they can compare to the numbness feeling when wearing thin gloves. Nerve damage is the main cause of peripheral neuropathy. It may be the result of problems such as trauma, infection, exposure to toxic substances, and metabolic problems. One of the most popular triggers of this disease is diabetes. In many situations, symptoms of peripheral neuropathy can be improved by time – especially if it is caused by a curable underlying disease. In this article, I would like to show my readers in Vkool.com some basic knowledge of this disease as well as home remedies for neuropathy which are safe and simple to apply. Firstly, you will need to look at the causes of the disease. 1. Causes: There are many risk factors which can lead people to suffer from neuropathy disease. It is not always simple to determine the causes of peripheral neuropathy, because of the numerous factors which can cause neuropathy (neuropathies). The triggers contain: – Expose to poisons: This exposure can include a number of toxic subst Continue reading >>

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