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What Happens When A Diabetic Doesn T Eat

Video: How Diabetes Affects Your Blood Sugar

Video: How Diabetes Affects Your Blood Sugar

Your body uses glucose for energy. Glucose metabolism requires insulin, a hormone produced by your pancreas. Here's how normal glucose metabolism works, and what happens when you have diabetes — a disease where your body either can't produce enough insulin or it can't use insulin properly. The food you eat consists of three basic nutrients: carbohydrates, protein and fat. During digestion, chemicals in your stomach break down carbohydrates into glucose, which is absorbed into your bloodstream. Your pancreas responds to the glucose by releasing insulin. Insulin is responsible for allowing glucose into your body's cells. When the glucose enters your cells, the amount of glucose in your bloodstream falls. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas doesn't secrete insulin — which causes a buildup of glucose in your bloodstream. Without insulin, the glucose can't get into your cells. If you have type 2 diabetes, your pancreas secretes less insulin than your body requires because your body is resistant to its effect. With both types of diabetes, glucose cannot be used for energy, and it builds up in your bloodstream — causing potentially serious health complications. Continue reading >>

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Desserts And Sweets For Diabetics

Get our comprehensive list of the best desserts and sweets for people with diabetes. Having diabetes doesn't mean you can never have dessert again. With some simple swaps and diabetic-friendly dessert recipes, you can satisfy your sweet tooth without sending your blood sugar soaring. Desserts may seem off-limits since many are high in sugar, but remember that for people with diabetes the total number of carbohydrates of a meal or snack matters more than the total sugar. That means dessert can still fit into your diet—with a few adjustments. Before you head to the kitchen, here are a few dessert guidelines and some of our favorite sweets that fit into a diabetic diet. If you opt for something sweet after dinner, you might want to skip the starch at your meal to keep your total carbs in check. But remember that, while exchanging your sweet potato for cheesecake can keep your carb intake steady, you'll lose the fiber, vitamins and other good-for-you nutrients that the sweet potato would provide. It's not a good idea to indulge in dessert every night; instead, enjoy desserts in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommends that most people with diabetes aim for 45-60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Unfortunately, a bakery-sized cookie can contain 60 grams of carbs alone. Choose a smaller portion, and you can still enjoy something sweet without using up your allotted carbohydrates for the meal. One of these Almond Cookies has only 9 grams of carbohydrates. While making desserts with artificial sweeteners can help you cut down on calories and carbs, it's a better idea to try to reduce your total sweetener consumption (from both sugar and noncaloric sources). Because artificial sweeteners are much sweeter than sugar, they may enhance your craving for sweets. They Continue reading >>

What Makes Glucose Levels Rise And Fall?

What Makes Glucose Levels Rise And Fall?

When you have diabetes it is important to understand what might make your blood glucose level rise or fall so that you can take steps to stay on target. ••••• When you eat any type of carbohydrate (starches, fruits, milk, sugars etc.), your body breaks it down into simple sugars. These get absorbed into the blood stream and insulin helps remove them from the blood into the cells to be used for energy. Without diabetes, our body usually makes just the right amount of insulin to match the food eaten, when diabetes is present, tablets or insulin injections are required to help this process. Things that can make your blood glucose rise A meal or snack with a bigger portion of carbohydrates than usual Less activity than usual Side effects of some medications Infection, surgery or other illness Changes in hormone levels, such as during menstrual periods, or adolescence Stress Things that can make your blood glucose fall A meal or snack with a smaller portion of carbohydrates than usual Taking too much insulin or a dose increase of your diabetes tablets Extra physical activity Side effects of some medications Missing a meal or a snack Drinking alcohol Continue reading >>

Eating Too Much Sugar In One Go: This Is What Is Happening In Your Body

Eating Too Much Sugar In One Go: This Is What Is Happening In Your Body

It happens to the best of us. You open a family-sized packet of gummy bears and a few Friends episodes later you’ve reached the bottom of the packet. For most adults and kids, eating a whole bag of lollies -- or block of chocolate, for that matter -- is an easy feat. But consuming this much sugar isn’t great, for both long term and short-term health. "Sugar is very calorie dense with hardly any nutrients, so lollies are empty calories and provide too many at once in terms of your daily intake. This can lead to obesity, which leads to an increased risk of heart disease, diabetes and cancers," Simone Austin, accredited practising dietitian and spokeswoman for the Dietitians Association of Australia, told The Huffington Post Australia. Sugar is a form of carbohydrate that the body converts to glucose. While some sugar is absolutely fine, your body is not going to love it when you down a whole packet of lollies in one go. Here's what happens. Mouth "Carbohydrates start to be digested in the mouth straight away as you’ve got digestive enzymes in your mouth. So some of the sugar basically enters through your cheeks," Austin said. This, dear friends, is not a good thing. Yes, your dentist is right, however much we wish they weren't. "Sugar is bad for your teeth," Austin said. "It feeds bacteria in your mouth that then break down the enamel on your teeth. "Dental care is really important. The fact is you are going to have better nutrition long term if you’ve got good teeth. If you can’t chew things you won’t be able to eat all the healthy vegetables, fruit and meat and so on. Stomach "Then the sugar enters your stomach, where it doesn’t really require much digestion at all and it gets absorbed in your small intestine," Austin told HuffPost Australia. At this point Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Things That Happen To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar

10 Surprising Things That Happen To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar

When people say they want to cut down on sugar, it’s usually their waistline that they’re thinking of. But eating too much sugar affects your body in all sorts of ways that might surprise you. And by ‘too much sugar’, we mean more than six teaspoons per day. That means just one can of fizzy drink could push you over the limit. If that seems unfair, then the side-effects of too much sugar are far worse. Here are some of the most surprising ones. Your body will stop telling you when you’re full Realising you’ve had enough to eat is the work of the hormone Leptin, but some studies have indicated that eating too much sugar causes the body to develop Leptin resistance. Without Leptin telling you when you’re full, you’ll just keep eating. You could develop insulin resistance Too much sugar, we all know, causes diabetes. But before full-blown diabetes develops, your body’s sensitivity to insulin will have decreased, and you’ll experience symptoms including fatigue, hunger, brain fog and high blood pressure – which contributes to heart failure. If you’re experiencing some of these symptoms then there’s still time to change your eating habits and save yourself from diabetes. You could develop strange dark patches on your skin Insulin resistance also causes acanthosis nigricans – darker patches appearing in the neck, armpits and groin. It can also lead to skin tags – dark, raised bits of skin. Even cutting back on sugar can’t fully cure these once they’ve developed. You could suffer liver failure It’s not just alcohol abuse that causes liver damage – too much sugar can too. An over-consumption of fructose can cause the liver to go into overdrive, causing liver inflammation and scarring, and even liver failure. There’s a strong link between Continue reading >>

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Eating Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Part 1 of 8 What is blood sugar? Blood sugar, also known as blood glucose, comes from the food you eat. Your body creates blood sugar by digesting some food into a sugar that circulates in your bloodstream. Blood sugar is used for energy. The sugar that isn’t needed to fuel your body right away gets stored in cells for later use. Too much sugar in your blood can be harmful. Type 2 diabetes is a disease that is characterized by having higher levels of blood sugar than what is considered within normal limits. Unmanaged diabetes can lead to problems with your heart, kidneys, eyes, and blood vessels. The more you know about how eating affects blood sugar, the better you can protect yourself against diabetes. If you already have diabetes, it’s important to know how eating affects blood sugar. Part 2 of 8 Your body breaks down everything you eat and absorbs the food in its different parts. These parts include: carbohydrates proteins fats vitamins and other nutrients The carbohydrates you consume turn into blood sugar. The more carbohydrates you eat, the higher the levels of sugar you will have released as you digest and absorb your food. Carbohydrates in liquid form consumed by themselves are absorbed more quickly than those in solid food. So having a soda will cause a faster rise in your blood sugar levels than eating a slice of pizza. Fiber is one component of carbohydrates that isn’t converted into sugar. This is because it can’t be digested. Fiber is important for health, though. Protein, fat, water, vitamins, and minerals don’t contain carbohydrates. These components won’t affect your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, your carbohydrate intake is the most important part of your diet to consider when it comes to managing your blood sugar levels. Part 3 Continue reading >>

When A Dog Won't Eat - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

When A Dog Won't Eat - Diabetes In Dogs: The K9diabetes.com Forum

Diabetes Discussion: Your Dog Anything related to your diabetic dog. Hunter has been getting fussier and fussier in the AM about his food. He gets kibble with some strained chicken broth and bits of chicken. Lately he is less than enthusiastic. This morning was the worst. He FINALLY ate, but it was 10-15 minutes of dog vs human mind games to get him to eat. What other things can he eat or tempt him to eat when he gets this fussy? I read someone tries white bread, do I need some of that? Should I give him some Kayo? But that is not food. And if he doesn't eat, I know not to give him his shot, but what do we do then? Wait til his night time food and shot? I'm going through the same thing with Abby not wanting to eat, and I sympathize with you. She was eating chicken/rice and then gave that up. I switched to boiled hamburg/rice, and she's been eating that but leaving more and more in the dish each time. Yesterday I went to the deli and got her some chopped ham, which she is loving...at the moment. I don't have any great advice on feeding except that for Abby it has been helpful to change things and keep trying to find something she will eat. When she stops eating the ham, I'll try scrambled eggs! Hopefully Hunter will come back to eating his dog food soon. In the meantime, you should NOT skip insulin when a diabetic dog doesn't eat. They still have basal needs and you need to meet them to keep the glucose in balance, even in the case of not eating. If Ozzi didn't eat, I would give him 50% of his usual dose, and then return to the normal dose when he started eating regularly. If Hunter's sugar remains high with no insulin, it might make him not want to eat even more, and continue the vicious cycle. Without insulin on board, I would definitely NOT give him Karo since that w Continue reading >>

Block Sugar From Your Body In 7 Easy Ways

Block Sugar From Your Body In 7 Easy Ways

One major reason this doesn't happen has to do with our diets. When you consume starch and refined sugar, these foods enter the bloodstream quickly, causing a sugar spike. Your body then produces the hormone insulin to drive that sugar from your bloodstream into cells. But over time, excessive levels of insulin can make your muscle cells lose sensitivity to the hormone, leading to type-2 diabetes and heart disease. Your fat cells are another story: They always remain sensitive. Insulin spikes lock fat into them, so you can't use it for energy. How do you break this cycle and get your body to work optimally again? Happily, you don't need to go on an extreme diet. The first step is just to reduce the blood sugar spikes that produce sharp increases of insulin. The substance in our diet that's most responsible for these surges is starch, namely, anything made from potatoes, rice, flour, corn, or other grains. (Think pasta, lasagna, white bread, doughnuts, cookies, and cakes.) You could cut out these foods entirely. But wouldn't it be great if there were a way to solve the problem without completely eliminating these carbs? It turns out there is. You can blunt the blood sugar-raising effects by taking advantage of natural substances in foods that slow carbohydrate digestion and entry into the bloodstream. No matter what kind of sugar blocker you use, your waistline (and health) will win in the end. Sugar Blocker 1: Have a fatty snack 10 to 30 minutes before your meals Reason: You remain fuller longer. At the outlet of your stomach is a muscular ring, the pyloric valve. It regulates the speed at which food leaves your stomach and enters your small intestine. This valve is all that stands between the ziti in your stomach and a surge of glucose in your bloodstream. But you can Continue reading >>

You Did Not Eat Your Way To Diabetes!

You Did Not Eat Your Way To Diabetes!

Don't fall for the toxic myth that you caused your diabetes by reckless overeating. While people with Type 2 diabetes often are seriously overweight, there is accumulating evidence that their overweight is a symptom, not the cause of the process that leads to Type 2 Diabetes. Even so, it is likely that you've been told that you caused your diabetes by letting yourself get fat and that your response to this toxic myth is damaging your health. Blaming you for your condition causes guilt and hopelessness. Even worse, the belief that people with diabetes have brought their disease on themselves inclines doctors to give people with diabetes abysmal care. They assume that since you did nothing to prevent your disease, you won't make the effort to control it. So they ignore your high blood sugars until they have lasted long enough to cause complications and then they prescribe the newest, most expensive, potentially dangerous but heavily marketed drugs, though the drug-maker's own Prescribing Information makes it clear that these drugs cannot lower your blood sugar to the levels that reverse or prevent complications. The myth that diabetes is caused by overeating also hurts the one out of five people who are not overweight when they contract Type 2 Diabetes. Because doctors only think "Diabetes" when they see a patient who fits the stereotype--the grossly obese, inactive patient--they often neglect to check people of normal weight for blood sugar disorders even when they show up with classic symptoms of high blood sugar such as recurrent urinary tract infections or neuropathy. Where Did This Toxic Myth Come From? The way this myth originated is this: People with Type 2 Diabetes often are overweight. And manny people who are overweight have a syndrome called "insulin resistance Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

My Dog Is A Picky Eater And Has Diabetes

My Dog Is A Picky Eater And Has Diabetes

Thankfully Bender is not a picky eater. He eats all his food at every meal. But what happens if he didn’t? Our other dog Luna will eat any from a 1/4th of her food to all of her food every meal. Its never the same. Imagining Luna on diabetes, I would think she would be difficult to regulate with an eating habit like that. So what could you do? Testing after every meal would be a pain, stressful for the dog, and would cause major micro adjusting for the dosages. Some thing I don’t recommend. The easiest thing would be to switch to a food that your dog loves and will eat all of it up. But what happens if that doesn’t work? Coming up with a sliding dosage scale might work based on food consumption. Some thing like this. Ate all the food – Full shot Ate 3/4th of the food – Subtract 1-2 units Ate 1/2 of the food – Subtract 2-4 units Etc. In theory this seems like it would work. Of course the amount of insulin units subtracted would be based on your dog and how much insulin they get. It would be different for each dog. And also going on the assumption that the dog is being fed the same amount at ever meal (like you should be doing for your diabetic dog). Its an interesting thought and some thing to ask my vet about. What are your thoughts? Continue reading >>

Living With

Living With

If you have type 2 diabetes, it's important to look after your own health and wellbeing, with support from those involved in your care. Caring for your health will make treating your diabetes easier and minimise your risk of developing complications of diabetes. Self care for type 2 diabetes includes: maintaining good physical and mental health preventing illness or accidents effectively dealing with minor ailments and long-term conditions. Your diabetes care team As type 2 diabetes is a long-term condition, you'll be in regular contact with your diabetes care team. Your GP or diabetes care team will also need to check your eyes, feet and nerves regularly because they can also be affected by diabetes. You should also be tested regularly – at least once a year – to check how well your diabetes is being controlled over the long term. A blood sample will be taken from your arm, and the HbA1c test will be carried out. It measures how much glucose is in the red blood cells, and gives your blood glucose levels for the previous two to three months. Lifestyle changes Healthy eating Eating a healthy, balanced diet is very important if you have diabetes. However, you don't need to avoid certain food groups altogether. You can have a varied diet and enjoy a wide range of foods as long as you eat regularly and make healthy choices. You can make adaptations when cooking meals, such as reducing the amount of fat, salt and sugar you eat, and increasing the amount of fibre. You don't need to completely exclude sugary and high-fat foods from your diet, but they should be limited. The important thing in managing diabetes through your diet is to eat regularly and include starchy carbohydrates, such as pasta, as well as plenty of fruit and vegetables. If your diet is well balanced, you Continue reading >>

What Happens If A Diabetic Eats A Lot Of Sugar?

What Happens If A Diabetic Eats A Lot Of Sugar?

Nothing happens in the short term. Having raised blood sugar from eating lots of sugar is no different in diabetics or healthy individuals. What does the damage for diabetics is the permanently raised blood sugar- they can’t get the sugar out of their blood, so it stays there. Insulin’s job is to get sugar out of the blood, and all type 2 diabetes is, is insulin resistance. Your cells no longer respond to insulin, so the sugar never leaves the blood like it does in everyone else. When the sugar stays in your blood it rots everything. Your body cells are bathed in sugar non-stop. You tend to get nerve damage in the feet as well as other cellular damage, which is why diabetics often have to have their feet chopped off since their feet literally rot off them. The tiny cells in your eyes are also very sensitive to damage, so your eyesight fails and you may develop cataracts. The liver is never flushed, so cirrhosis and liver scarring is common. As for your question details, if you try to take insulin to counter the high sugar, but keep eating lots of glycaemic foods, you will not be able to take enough. This is because your cells are insulin resistant- they don’t respond to insulin very well. If you just keep pumping more and more insulin into the blood you will get more of a response, but then you will become increasingly insulin resistant. I know this isn’t part of the question per se, but the best things to do diet-wise to avoid high sugar would be to go on a low carb/ zero carb diet. This is because fat is digested differently and has low impact on blood sugars compared to eating carbohydrates or sugars, so you never have significantly raised blood sugar in the same way you do if you eat lots of carbs. The best thing to do exercise-wise is HIIT training- this fl Continue reading >>

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Skipping a meal is typically no big deal. But if you have diabetes, missing meals can throw off the important balancing act between food intake and medication. The result is blood sugars that are too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) — and that’s dangerous. “If you take medications for diabetes that can cause low blood sugars, you should try not to skip meals,” says registered dietician Dawn Noe. “If you’re just not up to eating on a regular schedule, talk to your doctor about diabetes medications that won’t cause low blood sugars,” she says. Monitoring sugars is vital When you’re ill or just don’t feel like eating much, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels more closely than ever. How often depends on whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and what medications you take. For type 1 diabetes: Be sure to monitor your blood sugar before meals and before bedtime, typically four times per day, says diabetes specialist Bartolome Burguera, MD. Beyond that, check your blood sugars if you notice symptoms of low blood sugar. Those symptoms include: Hunger Shakiness or nervousness Sweating Dizziness or light-headedness Sleepiness Confusion Difficulty speaking Anxiety Weakness For type 2 diabetes: If you are taking a sulfonylurea medication, check your blood sugars at least twice a day — in the morning and at bedtime. “It’s important to keep in mind that sulfonylureas may cause blood sugar to drop during the day if you don’t eat anything after taking your medication,” Dr. Burguera says. If your only treatment is metformin, you may not need to check your blood sugar more than once a day. This medication doesn’t typically cause hypoglycemia. It is important to be aware of the symptoms associated with low blood sugars and Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

At age 14, Erin Williams was tired of medicine. Williams was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at age 11, and after three years of enduring a never-ending regimen of insulin shots and strict diet restrictions, she was frustrated. Embarrassed by her disease, she kept it a secret from everyone but her closest family and friends. At birthday parties, she made up excuses about why she couldn't have soda or cake. When a classmate saw her drinking juice boxes in the nurses office, she endured weeks of being called the "juice box thief" rather than just tell her classmates she had low blood sugar because of diabetes. Eventually, Williams rebelled the only way she could, she decided not take her insulin. She just didn't want to adhere to the strict diet and medical regimen even though it was vital to her health. "It wasn't this dramatic moment," recalled Williams. "It was mostly like I want to be like everybody else." The next morning when Williams woke up, she felt fine. "Well, nothing bad happened to me," Williams remembered thinking. "It creeps up on you. That's how it does it." Emboldened by her experiment, she continued to restrict her insulin. Without a regimented amount of insulin in her body to process glucose, Williams' body started to burn through fat and muscle. She lost weight very quickly even as she ate all the same foods. Classmates started commenting on her weight loss and remarked that she looked great. "You hear all these things and you're like, 'This is the greatest thing in the world,'" said Williams. "It takes a hold of your life like nothing else." After living with type 1 diabetes for three years, Williams was exhibiting the first signs of a disorder often called diabulimia. The term refers to the dual diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and an eating disorder. Man Continue reading >>

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